Back to Lancia

Lancia Video Cars

Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
This Lancia Aurelia Outlaw is Probably the Best Restomod We've Ever Seen

This Lancia Aurelia Outlaw is Probably the Best Restomod We’ve Ever Seen

That holds true especially if you are already hooked on Lancias...

The Lancia Aurelia was a car built in the 1950s before it was replaced by the more modern Flaminia. The most famous example is a racing version of the car that was based on the B20 two-door GT and competed in the Mille Miglia (where it came second overall in 1951), won its class at Le Mans the same year, and it was also raced in the Carrera Panamericana. Now, there’s a new model in the spotlight as it has been the subject of a rather extensive restomod.

Read more
Marchettino Drives a Modern Legend - the 2018 Lancia Stratos: Video

Marchettino Drives a Modern Legend - the 2018 Lancia Stratos: Video

Reborn modern Stratos driven up a technical road

The Lancia Stratos is one of those instantly recognizable automotive cars, which is why I’m happy that a new one has been launched, albeit as a super limited production model that is not even worth fantasizing about owning.

Read more
Petrolicious Features the Beautiful and Brutal 1974 Lancia Stratos Group 4: Video

Petrolicious Features the Beautiful and Brutal 1974 Lancia Stratos Group 4: Video

Introducing "The Rally Queen"

The Lancia Stratos was the first car to be constructed from the ground up with the sole purpose of going rallying. As legendary as it is fast, the Stratos still races in historical rally events, and this particular one won the 2017 European Historic Rally Championship with former endurance and GT racer Erik Comas behind the wheel.

Comas, a former Le Mans podium-finisher with Pescarolo, has owned four Stratoses over the years, but this one is the one he calls "The Rally Queen." It was formerly owned by Lancia test driver Claudio Maglioli who worked on the development of the Stratos. Comas took it back to Biella, Italy, where the car was originally maintained to have it refreshed before he returned it to action in 2015. That year, he won the Italian Historic Rally Championship. No wonder he hails the handling characteristics as "perfect."

Read more
Video of the Day: Jeremy Clarkson Talks about the Lancia 037

Video of the Day: Jeremy Clarkson Talks about the Lancia 037

This is one segment from The Grand Tour that you shouldn’t miss

The Lancia 037 holds a special place in the hearts of a lot of people. It’s one of those models that wasn’t supposed to exist, but homologation requirements obligated Lancia to build a little over 200 road-going models of the 037. The one you see here with Jeremy Clarkson is one of the 207 production 037s that were built. 35 years after it was produced, the Lancia 037 still looks as incredible as it’s always been.

The video of Clarkson’s time behind the wheel of the 037 is short, but if you haven’t seen the full segment, it’s something that you need to watch. Rarely do we get to see the three hosts trade in their skits and crass humor for a compelling and insightful segment that tells a gripping story of a car’s history and impact in the industry. For whatever reason, The Grand Tour adopted this kind of approach in this segment. The result is arguably the best segment of the show’s second season, possibly even its entire run.

Brashness aside, Clarkson is regarded as an authority in the auto industry. Far too often, he doesn’t use that platform to really espouse the real stories behind some of the cars he reviews. This time, he did, and we appreciate him for it. The Lancia 037 has a great story to tell, and for once, we’re pleased that Jeremy Clarkson was the one to tell it.

Read more
Video: Jay Leno Drives The 1967 Lancia Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato

Video: Jay Leno Drives The 1967 Lancia Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato

Lancia may be doomed for eternity after parent Fiat decided the brand will sell only one model and only in Italy as of 2015, but the Turin-based manufacturer will live forever in the hearts of car enthusiasts the world over. It’s cars such as the Delta, Fulvia, Montecarlo, Aurelia, Flaminia, and the Stratos that helped Lancia make a name for itself, one that will survive no matter what Marchionne decided to do with it.

Alfa Romeo may be the brand to own if you want to be a true petrol head, as Jeremy Clarkson once said, but Lancias were capable of delivering the same amount of thrill together with a better build quality. The Fulvia is a great example of Lancia craftsmanship, a vehicle described as "an engineering tour the force" that eventually went on to win the first Rally Championship for the Italians.

Built between 1963 and 1976, the Fulvia was offered in several configurations and with a host of V-4 engines. The Fulvia Coupe is the most famous of them, but no iteration was as intriguing as the Zagato-bodied Sport model. No wonder this Italian coupe was recently featured in Jay Leno’s Garage and driven by America’s most fervent car collector. Unlike its Coupe sibling, the Zagato had a rather awkward design. While Pininfarina and Bertone were known to have created the most beautiful cars of the era, Zagato crafted a host of unusual looking bodies in the 1960s, one of which is the Fulvia Sport 1.3.

It had a protruding front end, a pointy, Corvette Stingray-like rear and a hatch. It was a massive departure from the coupe model Piero Castagnero designed in 1965. Thankfully enough, some Zagato-bodied Fulvias have lived to this day and their owners are more than anxious to tell their story. Hit the play button above for a 26-minute history lesson and drive test of the Fulvia Sport 1.3 Zagato, a vehicle you’re not likely to encounter on your daily route anytime soon.

Click past the jump to see an image of the Fulvia Coupe prototype Lancia built back in 2006.

Read more
Video: Tribute to Lancia 037 Group B

Video: Tribute to Lancia 037 Group B

2014 was a sad year for Lancia. It’s when we found out Sergio Marchionne was planning to reduce the automakers lineup to a single model by discontinuing the Delta, and both the Chrysler-based Thema and Voyager. As if that wasn’t enough, the remaining Lancia Ypsilon will be sold only in Italy, which essentially means this Italian automaker is on a quick road to extinction. For me, a big Lancia enthusiast, that’s downright terrible. Sure, present-day Lancia is just a shadow of what it used to be, but that’s no reason to pull the plug on it and let it die. On the contrary, Marchionne should devise a plan to bring it back in the spotlight, much like he’s doing with Alfa Romeo.

It remains to be seen whether Fiat will come to its senses or not, but in the meantime I’m here to present you with one of Lancia’s glorious past moments. Thanks to Petrolicious, which has made a habit of showcasing some of the most important cars the industry has created, we can have a closer look at the Lancia 037, the racer that won the World Rally Championship and paved the way for the stunning first-generation Delta.

The 037 saga began in 1980, when Lancia started working on a rally car to comply with the then-new FIA Group B regulations. The Italians opted for a mid-engine layout and turned to Abarth for a few tips. Fitted with a supercharged, 2.0-liter, four-cylinder powerplant that developed 265 ponies at first and 325 in its final Evolution 2 configuration, the 037 became a successful rally car, winning the series in 1983 with German ace Walter Rohrl behind the wheel.

With FIA regulations requiring at least 200 road-going version to be built for homologation, Lancia also rolled out a Stradale version, with its engine detuned to 205 horses. Although less aggressive than its rally-course sibling, the 037 Stradale is now a collectible in its own right. If only Lancia would look back on its legendary cars and move toward reviving its heritage...

Read more
Video: Lancia Stratos at Rallye Isla Mallorca

Video: Lancia Stratos at Rallye Isla Mallorca

The Lancia Stratos has always been a legend in the automotive industry from the moment it was launched back in 1974 to the second time around when it was revived in 2010. Of course, the model revealed in 2010 was a one-off version based on a Ferrari F430 Scuderia, but it was still pretty cool. Well, now we have found a video of the car in action at the Rallye Isla Mallorca. This video shows both on-board driving actions and exterior shots of the Lancia Stratos.

As a reminder, the 2010 Lancia Stratos is powered by a 4.3 liter V8 engine that delivers a total of 503 HP and is mated to a 6-speed transmission. The model sprints from 0 to 60 mph in around 3.4 seconds and can hit a top speed close to 200 mph.

view all
Read more
Chris Harris riding shotgun in a selection of classis Lancia rally cars

Chris Harris riding shotgun in a selection of classis Lancia rally cars

If you watch Formula One as religiously as we do, then you’ll be aware that the commentators continually refer to F1 drivers as the best in the world, and while we respect their talent immensely, we do have a firm belief that rally drivers possibly possess even more skill. This is simply due to the fact that they often drive cars which can accelerate as fast as F1 cars on roads less than half the width of a common F1 track.

Additionally, rally cars have a lot more personality than F1 cars as classic rally cars were not as clinical as F1 cars of the time and right now, and if you love rally just as much as we do then the following video is a must.

In the latest episode of ‘Chris Harris on Cars’ on the Drive YouTube network, the man himself, Chris Harris, was lucky enough to be invited by Pirelli to the Italian launch of its new P7 Corsa Classic racing tire specifically designed for classic rally cars.

In a first, Harris rides shotgun in a selection of incredible rally cars, rather than drive them, but this has to go down as one of our very favorite Chris Harris reviews. Cars featured heavily in the video include the Lancia Stratos, Lancia Delta S4, and the incredible Lancia 037 which produces a noise so incredible that it will literally send shivers down your spine.

Add that to the fact that a host of extremely successful rally drivers were on hand to drive Harris around in the cars, including Markku Alen and Juha Kankkunen, and you have the makings of a truly incredible video.

view all
Read more
Video: Lancia Stratos - Old vs. New

Video: Lancia Stratos - Old vs. New

The original Lancia Stratos was launched in 1972 but only had a short shelf of life of two years when it was discontinued in 1974 with only 492 units being produced. It was especially perplexing because the first Stratos was by no means a sled on four wheels, thanks to a 2.4-liter Dino V6 engine that was capable of delivering 190 horsepower with an impressive top speed of 144 mph.

In 2010, the Stratos name rose from to grave with a modern iteration of the old classic supercar. This time around, the new model was based on a Ferrari 430 Scuderia from which it used many mechanical components such as the chassis, gearbox and, most importantly, a 4.3-liter V8 engine that was tuned up to 532 horsepower. With that much sizzle under its hood, the new Stratos is capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.3 seconds and to hit a top speed close to 200 mph.

So what does it feel like to have the two Stratos supercars - old and new - side by side with each other? The man himself, Marchettino, managed to shoot a video showing just that. 30 years apart and you can still make out the similarities between the two, especially when you hear the impressive sound of both engines.

Read more
2010 Lancia Stratos

2010 Lancia Stratos

Most new cars we feature are the creations from the world’s multibillion dollar automakers and are not very close to the heart. This New Stratos on the other hand is the realized dream of one man who poured his heart, soul, and a ton of his own money into the project. The labour of love involving automotive parts supplier, Michael Stoschek, has taken 24 years to materialize, all starting out from a friendship forged at a Lancia Stratos event held in Alta Badia back in 1986.

Michael, a self-confessed uber fan of the original Stratos, decided to create his own new version of the classic Italian Rally superstar. The outcome of all the hard work and passion, we have to say, is utterly amazing. To prove the passion this part-time racer has for the original, he has even bought the trademark rights for the Stratos name from Lancia – which we can assure you didn’t come cheap.

The resemblance to the original is uncanny, yet everything has been updated and made better, without losing any of the nostalgia and old school appeal. The overall “wedge” shape is still the same and the powerplant is still from Ferrari – albeit louder and more powerful. The New Stratos shares a large amount of its underpinnings with the Ferrari F430 Scuderia – which is a brilliant car. If that’s any indication of how this car will ride, handle, sound, and perform, we are in for an absolute treat of automotive euphoria.

UPDATE 02/14/2011: The 2010 One-Off Lancia Stratos may not be a one-off for very much longer. So far 40 potential buyers in Europe and other regions have expressed in interest in purchasing the Ferrari-based model, and plenty more are expected to climb on the bandwagon. If a small series is produced, rumors suggest that each unit will cost about €400,000, or around $545,000 at the current exchange rates. Something tells us that Michael Stoschek - the owner of the one and only 2010 Lancia Stratos so far - may not be too happy with his exclusive ride getting cloned, even if it is only for about 40 other people.

UPDATE 05/10/2011: Michael Stoschek took his brand new Lancia Stratos for a spin on the race track. Hit the jump for the video.

UPDATE 06/27/11: Michael Stoschek had the New Lancia Stratos built for only one reason: racing. In the latest video, Stoschek rides his brand new ride with Dieter Hawranke as he blasts off along the streets of Zwickau during the Sachsen Rallye 2011. Check out the video after the jump to see the New Stratos run rampant on concrete!

Hit the jump to continue reading.

view all
Read more
Video: Ferrari CEO Luca di Montezemolo takes the one-off Lancia Stratos for a test run

Video: Ferrari CEO Luca di Montezemolo takes the one-off Lancia Stratos for a test run

The Pininfarina-built, one-off New Lancia Stratos was recently presented to its smiling new owner, Michael Stoschek after over two years of development. But before Mr. Stoschek gets to enjoy his ultra rare sports car, the Stratos has to make a few more test rounds and, not to mention, have its own media unveiling at the Paul Ricard Circuit next week.

But before that, the New Stratos headed over to Ferrari’s Fiorano circuit in Maranello so that no less than Ferrari CEO Luca di Montezemolo can take it for a spin. Seeing as the New Stratos is based on the underpinnings of the Ferrari F430 Scuderia, it would only make sense that di Montezemolo had testing dibs on the one-off sports car.

Needless to say, the Stratos turned out to be as good as advertised with the Ferrari chief showering it with lavish praises after giving it a proper shakedown at the Fiorano circuit. Di Montezemolo was so geeked up after driving the car that he even invited Ferrari technical director, Roberto Fedeli, to have his turn behind the wheel of the sports car.

For a car that took more than two years to develop, we certainly expected nothing less from the one-off Lancia Stratos because anything less than two resounding thumbs up would be a bitter disappointment.

Read more
Video: Lancia Stratos final testings

Video: Lancia Stratos final testings

The new Lancia Stratos is currently making its final testings. Current WTCC and former Formula-1- Pilot Tiago Monteiro tested the New Stratos at Balocco test track, Italy.

Also, on September 13th, the final wind tunnel test was held at Pininfarina in Turin. The aerodynamic data already gleaned from the 1:1 model of the New Stratos, together with all the subjective driving impressions from the various test tracks, was compiled and applied to the optimization of the lift and downforce values.

This Lancia is a one-off build for a rich German businessman by Pininfarina. There haven’t been any new details released on the car, but this is the first time we have seen large photos. Under the hood is a 483-horsepower motor that came from the Ferrari 430. The body is carbon fiber and the chassis is shorter than the 430’s.

Wind tunnel testing after the jump.

Read more
Lancia Stratos caught testing on track

Lancia Stratos caught testing on track

Lancia may not be the first brand you associate with a supercar – it may not even be the ninth or tenth brand you’d think of – but the truth sometimes is stranger than what people think.

And the truth is, Lancia is making a supercar – they’re calling it the Stratos – and with the help of noted coachbuilder, Pininfarina, we may see a whole lot more of the car in the coming future.

For now, we’re going to settle for this video of the Stratos, which, at this point, is probably still a prototype, being taken for a quick run around the track by no less than Michael Stoschek, the man behind the entire project. We don’t even need to understand German to know that there seems to be a lot of expectations directed at this car, especially considering that the Stratos is pretty much a mini version of a Ferrari 430 Scuderia with the car’s engine being a Ferrari V8 and its chassis based on the aforementioned Prancing Horse sports car.

Like we said, we’re going to run off a lot more models of supercars before we come across the Stratos, but for what it’s worth, this Lancia/Pininfarina project should be making a name for itself sometime down the road.

Read more
TopSpeed News: January 6th, 2008

TopSpeed News: January 6th, 2008

Read more