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1949 Lincoln Mercury Coupe EV by ICON

1949 Lincoln Mercury Coupe EV by ICON

A classic, sleeper car with an EV powertrain

We see a lot of restomods where people or companies thump new engines into classic cars. But how about putting an electric powertrain into a vintage car? This is not a new concept; in fact, there are quite a few companies who have been working on this for quite some time now. The conversion companies were in a large number even in the last century, and a perfect testament for this would be the formation of the Electric Auto Association back in 1967. However, this takes a lot of skill, money, and precise execution. One such classic car fanatic company, which has done many conversions in the past, is ICON; and this time, the company has turned a 1949 Mercury Coupe into an EV.

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1942 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet

1942 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet

A Lincoln any car enthusiast would love to own.

The Lincoln Continental has had an interesting and somewhat choppy history. It originally started out as a custom one-off for Edsel Ford himself, but Ford realized that he could sell such a model, and the prototype quickly became a production model. That was 1939, at which point every Continental that was built was done so by hand. Eventually, Lincoln got around to making machine dies in 1941, but the car was only produced for another year before WWII brought production to a halt. Which brings us to this car – a 1942 Lincoln Continental Cabriolet.

This car will be going under the hammer at Mecum’s auction during the 2016 Monterey Car Week, and is just 1 of 136 models that were produced before the war forced Lincoln to stop production. Even more important is the fact that only 27 of the original 136 models are believed to be in existence, making this one rare vehicle. It has been through Concours restoration and has even be refreshed in the correct Darian Blue from 1942. And, as you can see from the picture above, this is one fine example of history – one that I could go without writing about when I saw it listed for auction.

With that said, let’s take a good look at the car and talk a little more about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the Lincoln Continental Cabriolet.

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1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible

1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible

Jackie O’s personal drop-top

Some cars are special because of their racing background, recalling a moment when man and machine triumphed in a battle of speed. Other cars are special for their heritage, representing a particular slice of time that encompasses an experience from long ago. This car is special because of its previous owner. You see, the bright white slice of Americana you see before you was once the personal transportation of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the wife of John. F. Kennedy and First Lady of the United States. This Lincoln Continental was parked at the White House garage and used by Jackie O during JFK’s tenure as the 35th President of the United States, and perfectly encapsulates that period through it’s broad, simple design, boat-like on-road demeanor, and seemingly endless style. What’s more, it’s going up for sale later this month.

This luxury full-size four-door carries the VIN number 1Y86H420678, and is a certified history lesson on wheels. It’s seen only one other owner besides the trend-setting First Lady, and it’s received an older restoration to keep it fresh.

So what’s Mrs. Kennedy’s previous personal ride really like? Read on to find out.

Continue reading to learn more about this unique 1961 Lincoln Continental Convertible.

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1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Concept by Carrozzeria Boano Torino

1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Concept by Carrozzeria Boano Torino

The question of where to take Lincoln’s styling was top-of-mind for Ford during the mid 1950s, and the net it cast was to both the internal styling teams and one special dream car creator of Italy.

Turbulent times for all the Blue Oval brands followed the market flop of their Edsel series, and Chevrolet was lighting up newsprint and auto shows with their swanky Motorama events and the original Corvetteconcept of 1953.

The desire for miraculous styling direction and stunning concept cars led to all the non-GM American car brands to pair off with Italian styling houses. During this flurry of deals, Ghia signed up with Chrysler, Bertone for Packard and Carrozerria Touring with Hudson.

Lincoln went with a less-renowned name of Felice Paolo to dress a rolling chassis with bespoke coupe bodywork ahead of the Turin motor show. The orange lacquer paint was barely dry on the 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Exclusive Study by Carrozzeria Boano Torino when it was rolled onto the rotating platform of the Turin auto show.

This stunning concept car is headed for the glitz and flash bulbs again this November with RM Auctions, where the car’s previous million-dollar pricing is expected to climb in value yet again.

Click past the jump for all the unusual and one-off style of the 1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Concept.

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Holy Cha-Ching, Batman! Original 1966 Batmobile Sells for $4.2 Million at Barrett-Jackson

Car collector Rick Champagne has every right pop open a bottle of his last name after becoming only the second owner of one of Hollywood’s most iconic cars. He had to sweat out a feverish bidding war for the George Barris’ original 1966 Batmobile, the same one used in the Adam West Batman TV series. In the end, however, his checkbook did all the talking to the tune of $4.2 million at the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, Arizona.

The winning bid price might seem steep, but given the kind of car the ’66 Batmobile is, we presume that it was worth every last penny from Champagne’s bank account.

With the classic movie car now belonging to him, Champagne only becomes the second owner of the Batmobile after Barris, the same man who famously built the Batmobile in only 15 days in time for it to be used in the Batman TV series. On top of the car itself, Champagne also went home with number of memorabilia and documentation from Barris’ own personal collection.

Not a bad haul for Mr. Champagne!

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1966 Batmobile

1966 Batmobile

Though it’s not a combination of a slick motorcycle and gargantuan, rocket powered beast, the original ’66 Batmobile does require you to wear the cheesy costume if you plan on driving it. Or if you simply want to showcase this great piece of cinematic history amongst your car collection, it will be up for grabs at the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 19, 2013.

Built by legendary car customizer George Barris, legend has it that this car was put together in just 15 days, though there wasn’t any actual record of the car being put together at that short amount of time.

After being given $15,000 (which was quite a lot in ’66) and the short time frame, like any realist would do, Barris used a Lincoln Futura, which he bought for $1 about a decade earlier, and repainted it black. Since CGI effects were considered a thing of the future, Barris had to fit all the ridiculous crime-fighting gadgets to the car. The gadgets included: the Batphone, the Emergency Bat-turn Lever, the Batray, the Bat Beam and best of all, the Bat-tering Ram. It even comes with a working parachute from a drag racer.

Fancy gadgets and paint jobs aside, this car is a 390 cubic-inch V-8 powered Lincoln Futura. When the engine was in the Futura, it featured 330 horsepower, but the current output was not released. With a "bubble" roof and some futuristic design cues, the original 1950’s Futura concept gave the public insight on what future automobiles would look like. Looks like they got that concept totally wrong from where we’re standing today.

While most people sell their cars at half its original price, George Barris will be making a big fortune when he sells his black old Lincoln Futura at Scottsdale. Good work, Mr Barris...

We’ll update this review with the final selling price once the auction closes.

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1961 Lincoln Continental

1961 Lincoln Continental

The fourth generation Continental was pure class

Lincoln Continental was first developed in 1939 as Edsel Ford’s one-off personal vehicle. The car was an elegant convertible with a long hood covering a big V-12 with long front fenders and a short trunk. The externally-mounted and covered spare tire made its first appearance here before becoming the Continental series’ trademark. The design was allegedly sketched out in an hour by Eugene Gregorie working from the blueprints of the Lincoln Zephyr.

But when the 1961 Continental was introduced, the automotive trade press was stunned. The car’s look was a dramatic departure from the styling of the 1960 Lincoln – in fact, it was a complete break from the fins, fat chrome trim, and dog-legged windshields that were so characteristic of all cars of the prior five years. It did show some hints of fine cars of the past. The Continental Mark II influence could be seen in the mesh grille, the wraparound taillight design, and the rise in beltline just ahead of the rear wheel cutout.

More than just a pretty face, the 1961 Continental influenced design for later models like. This includes the 1963 Pontiac Grand Prix, the 1963 Buick Riviera, and the 1964 Chrysler Imperial. The design turned out to be absolutely brilliant, with clean, uncluttered lines, perfect proportions, and no extraneous decoration. That such a masterpiece ever made it past the committees, politics, and egos then battling for position at Ford was tantamount to a miracle. The new design was a little smaller with the overall length dropping to 212.4 inches from 227 and the wheelbase being reduced from 131 to 123 inches. The rear doors were hung from the rear and opened from the front. This "suicide door" style was to become the best-known feature of 1960s Lincolns.

The model was available in two options: four-door sedan and four-door convertible. The Lincoln Continental sedan shown in the sketch was manufactured at the Wixom, Michigan assembly plant – where Lincolns are still made today. It originally sold for $6,067 and weighed almost 5,000 pounds. The car was powered by a big 430 cubic inch V-8 and traveled down the highways of 1961 in a stately fashion, transporting its occupants in luxury and quiet.

Continue reading for more information about the 1961 Lincoln Continental

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