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1954 Maserati A6GCS by Fiandri & Malagoli

1954 Maserati A6GCS by Fiandri & Malagoli

The kind of car that gets you weak in the knees when you lay eyes on it

Maserati’s 200S, 300S, and 450S proved the once-great Maserati factory could still play with the big boys on any turf in the World Sports Car Championship but it was the unassuming, yet painfully gorgeous, A6GCS from 1953 that announced Maserati’s mid-50s sports car onslaught.

Part of the A6 family of models that dates back to the ’40s, the A6GCS was powered by a 170 horsepower engine at first. Only 52 were ever built and this particular example finished third overall in the 1954 Mille Miglia.

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Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

The car for which the Balance of Performance was created

In GT racing, the Maserati MC12 is remembered as a ferociously effective car in the GT1 class, racking up numerous race wins and titles in the now-defunct FIA GT Championship. With a career spanning seven seasons, it was the car to beat in Europe but it never caused much of a stir in North-America. Risi Competizione first campaigned one with help from AF Corse in 2005 with special dispensation from IMSA. It stood out and this was no mean feat given it shared grids with the Saleen S7, the Aston Martin DBR9, the Corvette C6.R, and the Dodge Viper GTS-R but it never delivered on its promise. Two years later, in 2007, storied Swiss-American squad Doran Lista brought the MC12 back to the American Le Mans Series and the car you see here is that exact car driven twice in the ALMS 12 years ago. We know you want it and so do we.

The Maserati MC12 is one of those cars that divides opinions: some consider it to be ridiculous with its race car-inspired physique that reminds you more of a ’90s homologation special model such as Porsche’s 911 GT1 rather than a ’00s supercar while others can’t stop praising both its appearance and its performance. On the race tracks, though, there was no room for such arguments: the MC12 was the dominant force in the FIA GT between 2005 and 2009 with Michael Bartels’ Team Vitaphone becoming the de facto Maserati team during the car’s tenure at the top of the GT1 pile. But can a car that never competed at Le Mans and that was never competitive in America really be considered great? Share with us your opinions in the comment section below, but not before you go through the story of this unique racer.

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1975 Maserati Bora 4.7

1975 Maserati Bora 4.7

Maserati’s classy move to the wadge shape in the Citroen days

The Maserati Bora, a classic Giugiaro design, is the first mid-engine sports car to come from Maserati and the bigger brother of the more well-known Merak, which massively outsold and outlived the Bora. Less than 600 were made, all with V-8 engines.

The birth of the Lamborghini Miura took the world by storm. It produced shock waves that rocked all the big names in the world of sports car manufacturing. Basically, after the Miura, everyone had to have a mid-engine supercar in its lineup. Alejandro De Tomaso came up with the Mangusta which followed the latest trends in design which dictated that the body should have a lot of straight surfaces and razor-sharp edges which would, in turn, reduce drag and make the whole thing look incredible. You can thank Marcello Gandini for this trend, the Italian designer behind the Miura who quickly moved on to a more futuristic design language with the Alfa-Romeo Carabo which was exhibited at the Paris Motor Show 50 years ago.

Maserati, who were still employing their elegant Ghibli, a quintessential grand tourer through and through, decided they should have a mid-engine car too. Ghibli’s designer Giorgetto Giugiaro, of Italdesign, was phoned up and, by mid-1969, the Bora prototype was in its testing phase. The finished product was gorgeous to look at, and an advertised top speed of over 170 mph was astonishing at the time. It was also a car that you could drive for extended periods of time thanks to the comfortable cabin and many amenities that weren’t too common in supercars.

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1956 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta Zagato

1956 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta Zagato

A cool alternative to the Ferrari 250 SWB

Introduced in 1947, the A6 isn’t your regular car nameplate. Unlike most badges, it was used for a variety of models, including both road-legal and race-spec vehicles, as well as single-seat race cars. Although production lasted ten years, the A6 is a rare gem, especially in A6G 2000 Zagato trim. It’s so rare and desirable that RM Sotheby’s estimates that it will be able to auction one for at least $4.25 million.

Developed to replace the 6CM race car, the A6, in which A is for Alfieri Maserati and 6 for six cylinders, also spawned a road-legal car. The first one to arrive was the A6 1500, but the updated A6G 2000 model was far more successful. In 1954, the A6G 2000 was updated, changing its name to the A6G/54. Originally bodied by Frua and Allemano, the A6G 2000 also received a Zagato body in 1956, a collaboration that resulted in a lighter and more aerodynamic car. Not just beautiful to look at, the Zagato-designed A6G 2000 also had a successful racing career.

This particular model, which will go under the hammer in August 2018, competed at the Mille Miglia in 1956 and it’s one of only 20 cars ever built. Extensively documented by marque historian Adolfo Orsi Jr., it went through a two-year restoration and won two awards at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, plus another one at the 2015 Villa d’Este Concorso d’Eleganza. Yes, this one’s in mint condition and as special as they get, so it’s not surprising that it could fetch in excess of $4 million.

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1969 Maserati Ghibli Spyder

1969 Maserati Ghibli Spyder

A rare example of classic Maserati design

The Ghibli name has been used for three, very different vehicles from Maserati, with the most recent making its debut in 2013. The second-generation of the car was produced from 1992 to 1998 and was a two-door coupe that looked like it should have had four doors and somewhat resembled a Volkswagen Jetta. The first generation was arguably the best of any car to bear the Ghibli name, and a rare, spyder version just went up for auction through Mecum during Monterey Car Week 2016.

Produced between 1967 and 1973, the Ghibli was produced in 1295 examples, 1,170 of which were in coupe form. There were 125 Spyder examples created, but only 37 of those were produced with the 4.9-liter and a five-speed manual transmission as standard equipment. And, the beautiful yellow example that you see here is one of them. To make the car even rarer, however, is the fact that the car was built for the U.S. market but was completed to Euro specifications – an honor that only 14 other models are said to share with this model.

Knowledge of the car’s history is pretty thin, but it was delivered brand new to Prestige Motors in California. From there everything is a bit of a mystery until 1994 when a Maserati Owners Club member purchased the car. At this point, the car was due for restoration. In 2008, it was sent to Motorcar Galler in Florida and later returned to Europe for full restoration to the condition you see before you. Presented with the auction was a letter from Maserati Classiche that confirms it is authentic and a second letter that certifies the location it was shipped when new and that it still wore the Giallo Yellow paint that you see on the car today.

That’s about enough for a history lesson, though. Let’s dive on in and take a look at this Maserati Ghibli Spyder and talk a little about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1969 Maserati Ghibli Spyder.

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2016 Mecum Monterey Auction – Preview

2016 Mecum Monterey Auction – Preview

A little bit of everything, for the right price

Mecum Auctions has been involved with collector cars for almost three decades now, growing from a small family business to selling roughly 20,000 lots per year. In addition to top-dollar automobiles, Mecum also offers vintage motorcycles, collectible road art, and believe it or not, tractors. But you and I don’t really care about all that other stuff – we’re in it for the cars, from cutting-edge performance machines to ironclad muscle cars, antique classics to no-frills racers. Thankfully, Mecum has the entire spread on tap. The auction house averages more than one event per month, but one of the biggest is in California for Monterey Car Week. Roughly 600 vehicles are slated to hit the block for 2016, and we’ve got some of the most interesting of them profiled right here.

Highlighting the lineup for Monterey is the Modern Speed Collection, a host of ultra-high-end speed-mobiles from the present day. Mecum calls it “the apex of 21st Century automotive performance,” and picking through the offerings, I’m inclined to agree. Think rare, gorgeous, and absurdly quick.

TopSpeed will be on the scene this year, bringing you all the latest. Read on for a taste of what’s in store.

Update 08-20-2016 5:00 P.M. PST We’re on the scene at Mecum and have updated this preview with a welcome video. Check it out in the preview below.
Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Mecum Monterey Auction.

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1962 Maserati 5000 GT Coupe

1962 Maserati 5000 GT Coupe

For a company with as long a history as Maserati, it would normally be very difficult to pick one car that stands above the others as the very best. But for Maserati, most experts are pretty comfortable saying the best car to get a trident badge was the 5000 GT. This is obviously not to say that Maserati hasn’t built many exciting cars, just that the 5000 GT was that special. Not only that, but the era in which it was built could conceivably be thought of as Maserati’s golden era, one of the only times it wasn’t hurting for money or in need of outside ownership.

With the launch of the 3500 GT as a competitor to the Ferrari 250, Maserati was making a healthy profit for the first time in a while. The car had even attracted the attention of the Shah of Iran, an avid car collector. But the Shah wanted a special one, not just a run of the mill production model. So he requested that Maserati build him one with the engine out of the 450S race car and unique coachwork. Maserati agreed that this was a good idea, and even ended up building a short production run of them.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1962 Maserati 5000 GT Coupe.

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Maserati Boomerang Concept Will Be Auctioned In September

Maserati Boomerang Concept Will Be Auctioned In September

Italian concept cars of the 1970s were how the future was supposed to look. It’s the era that brought us the 1973-1990 Lamborghini Countach, the Lancia Stratos Zero Concept, the Lancia Sibilo concept and Pininfarina’s 1970 Ferrari 512S Modulo concept (Marcello Gandini designed all of these with the exception of the Ferrari). Add the 1972 Maserati Boomerang by Giugiaro to that list. The sole example will cross the auction block at the Bonhams event in September in Chantilly, France.

Originally shown at the Turin Motor Show in 1971 as an epowood mockup, the Maserati Boomerang wears a futuristic body penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro. It was designed shortly after he co-founded Italdesign Giugiaro, following stints at both Bertone and Ghia. It later reappeared at the 1972 Geneva Motor Show as a fully functional car built on the chassis of the Maserati Bora.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1956 Maserati 200 SI

1956 Maserati 200 SI

Usually, ultra-rare antique collectible cars are polished to a mirror finish, glistening with pristine perfection like the first day they rolled onto pavement. This is not one of those cars. This Maserati brings with it a raw personality and racing heritage. The exterior is unpainted, bearing welds and seams that exhibit its competitive evolution. Its cockpit has housed many racing legends. Its drivetrain was cutting-edge for the time.

The silver bullet before you is the very first Maserati 200 S ever built, chassis number 2401. It’s Maserati Classiche Certified, and was used extensively as a works team and development car, eventually receiving an update to SI-spec in the mid 50s. It’s won a slew of prominent races, and features a Formula 2 engine and unique, handcrafted aluminum body. Its provenance is extensive, including period photos, magazine articles, and copies of the original build sheets.

It is Maserati history incarnate, with all its glory and imperfections, and it’s looking for a new home. All you need is just a couple million dollars, and hopefully, a nitrogen-filled garage.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1956 Maserati 200 SI.

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1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

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1953 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spyder by Fantuzzi

1953 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spyder by Fantuzzi

Only a 1950s Maserati Spyder racecar could decline a $2.2 million dollar auction bid and go home disappointed. This 1953 Maserati A6 Sypder by Fantuzzi did not sell after failing to meet its reserve, but is still one of the most breathtaking automobile designs in history.

Who knows what collectors are thinking during these boozy social events of the high-dollar auction world. This Spyder, known by its code name of A6GCS/53 and/or chassis number 2053, has had quite the racing history to go with its stunning red paintwork, topless style and luxurious Jaeger dashboard gauges.

Despite some on-track crash damage in 1955 and a Chevy engine living under that soft nose in the 1960s, this Maserati Spyder is finally back in concours condition following a six-figure restoration since coming back to America in 1999.

Originally a U.S.-imported racing machine, the legendary Juan Miguel Fangio even took this exact Maserati Spyder for its first few laps in 1954.

Like many racecars from bygone eras, the Maserati A6 Spyder by Fantuzzi does not have mind-popping performance specifications or top speed claims. What is does have is true classic car history, with every panel and curve of this gorgeous bodywork telling the stories of long-passed racing glory for the Trident brand.

It also can stop your heart with its simple and delicate beauty, and knowledge that its drivers needed equal parts bravery, physical strength, and mental focus to take home podium trophies.

Click past the jump for the full review of the 1953 Maserati A6GCS/53 Spyder by Fantuzzi, certainly one of the best-looking racing speedsters in automobile history.

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Early Production 2014 Maserati Quattroporte Fetches $340,000 at Auction

Early Production 2014 Maserati Quattroporte Fetches $340,000 at Auction

Out of the shadows of Barrett-Jackson, a similar charity event was held at the Naples Winter Wine Festival in Florida recently. One of the auction pieces that drew frenzied bidding from the gathered crowd was a 2014 Maserati Quattroporte, one of the first production models of its kind to find an owner.

Having just made its world debut at the 2013 Detroit Auto Show, the sixth-generation Quattroporte was one of the most-heavily bid-on items in the auction, generating an impressive total of $340,000. Apparently, being one of the first to own one of the early production models was more than enough reason for bidders to go gaga over it.

In the end, the $340,000 was an impressive amount, particularly because proceeds from the auction, including the amount generated from the 2014 Quattroporte auction, will benefit the Naples Children & Education Foundation. All in all, the auction raised more than $8.5 million for a number of different charities, an endeavor that’s always marked with good tidings from everyone in the auto industry.

As for the new owner of the 2014 Quattroporte, you got a really good one, sir. The latest-generation Quattraporte is one awesome luxury car.

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Ferrari FXX Evoluzione and Maserati MC 12 join the lineup in supercar auction

Ferrari FXX Evoluzione and Maserati MC 12 join the lineup in supercar auction

Gooding and Company are preparing for an amazing auction event set to take place on Friday, January 21 2011 in Scottsdale. This event will lead to the auctioning off of many supercars belonging to the estate of renowned collector Benny Caiola. Although many supercars will be in attendance and hoping to be sold to a good home, the two most prized pieces will be the 2006 Ferrari FXX Evoluzione and a 2005 Maserati MC 12.

The 2006 Ferrari FXX Evoluzione is one of 30 FXX examples of Ferrari’s most advanced production car ever created. It is powered by a 6262 cc V12 engine that delivers 860 hp at 9500 rpm and is capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds, while top speed goes up to an impressive 249 mph.

The 2005 Maserati MC 12 was purchased direct from the factory and is vehicle number 31 of the 50 built. It is powered by a 6.0-liter V-12 engine that delivers an impressive 624 HP and can exceed 205mph at full throttle, sprinting from 0 to 60mph in just 3.8 seconds.

The two models are expected to be auctioned off for more than $4 million and join a long line of other supercars ready to take the auction plunge. The list of cars includes a 1995 Ferrari F50, a 2010 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano HGTE, a 2009 Lamborghini Gallardo LP 560-4, and a 2008 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster.

Press release after the jump.

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