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Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

The car for which the Balance of Performance was created

In GT racing, the Maserati MC12 is remembered as a ferociously effective car in the GT1 class, racking up numerous race wins and titles in the now-defunct FIA GT Championship. With a career spanning seven seasons, it was the car to beat in Europe but it never caused much of a stir in North-America. Risi Competizione first campaigned one with help from AF Corse in 2005 with special dispensation from IMSA. It stood out and this was no mean feat given it shared grids with the Saleen S7, the Aston Martin DBR9, the Corvette C6.R, and the Dodge Viper GTS-R but it never delivered on its promise. Two years later, in 2007, storied Swiss-American squad Doran Lista brought the MC12 back to the American Le Mans Series and the car you see here is that exact car driven twice in the ALMS 12 years ago. We know you want it and so do we.

The Maserati MC12 is one of those cars that divides opinions: some consider it to be ridiculous with its race car-inspired physique that reminds you more of a ’90s homologation special model such as Porsche’s 911 GT1 rather than a ’00s supercar while others can’t stop praising both its appearance and its performance. On the race tracks, though, there was no room for such arguments: the MC12 was the dominant force in the FIA GT between 2005 and 2009 with Michael Bartels’ Team Vitaphone becoming the de facto Maserati team during the car’s tenure at the top of the GT1 pile. But can a car that never competed at Le Mans and that was never competitive in America really be considered great? Share with us your opinions in the comment section below, but not before you go through the story of this unique racer.

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2005 Maserati MC12 Corsa Can Be Yours For $3 Million

2005 Maserati MC12 Corsa Can Be Yours For $3 Million

Introduced in 2004, the Maserati MC12 — essentially a re-bodied Ferrari Enzo — was built in only 55 units through 2005. Five of them remained with Maserati for its FIA GT Championship program, which puts the MC12, with its only 50 retailed units, among the rarest supercars ever built. Needless to say, you’d have more luck at finding one of the 400 Ferrari Enzos for sale nowadays.

However, there’s a specific version of the MC12 that’s even rarer. I’m talking about the MC12 Corse, a track-confined supercar built for customer use. To make it simple, think of it as the equivalent of the Enzo-based Ferrari FXX. Only 12 were built and sold for $1.47 million to select customers. Much like Ferrari did with the FXX, Maserati was responsible for the storage and maintenance of the cars, with their respective owners driving them on specially organized track days only.

That said, purchasing an MC12 Corsa is likely next to impossible, with very few customers willing to let their prized and rare supercars go. However, a near-mint example is currently for sale at Ferrari-Maserati of Ft. Lauderdale, and get this, it has only 55 miles on the odometer and perfect paint. There’s no information as to whom owned the vehicle until now, but the dealership will be more than happy to part with this piece of Maserati racing history for $2,999,900. That’s LaFerrari FXX K money right there!

Click "Continue Reading" to learn more about the Maserati MC12 Corsa.

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1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi

It all started in 1956 when wealthy American businessman Tony Parravano hired the Italian manufacturer, Maserati to develop a new V-8 for use in the chassis of the Kurtis Indy. Maserati saw the opportunity to revive the project codenamed Tipo 54 and develop its own engine for use its sport-specific chassis. The original car carrying a V-6 engine with chassis number 3501 became the test bed for the car ordered by the American.

The 450S made its first appearance at the Swedish Grand Prix’s practice session in August 1956, stunning everyone with its tremendous acceleration and top speed. The car clocked the third best timing in the practice, but the underdeveloped car could not handle the vibrations resonating from the wrong firing order of the engine’s spark plugs. Afterwards, the 450S received a new chassis at Mondena factory.

The development continued and in 1957, the new production 450S was rolled out to have its maiden race at the 1000 km of Buenos Aires where it led the Ferrari twin-cam sports car by 10 seconds. The car suffered from a failed transmission and retired from the race. However, the car went on to claim its first ever podium finish in the 1957 Swedish GP. Sadly, FIA changed the rules next year, making 450S ineligible for the Grand Prix.

The car was quickly prepared for the 1956 Mille Miglia 1,000-mile race. Legendary driver Stirling Moss, along with Denis Jenkinson as navigator, experienced a brake failure and the car came to rest against a tree. Driver and co-driver walked away without a scratch, but the car had to return to the factory for repairs and further development.

Fantuazzi then came into picture when he designed a new body with a contoured design. The car also got a longer wheelbase to accommodate the new V-8 engine. The updated vehicle was tested in the Swedish Grand Prix in August 1956 where the car’s builders continued to tweak is new chassis and make improvements.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1956 Maserati 450S Prototype by Fantuzzi.

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