Maserati

Maserati was founded on December 1, 1914, in Bologna, by the Maserati brothers: Alfieri, Bindo, Carlo, Ettore, and Ernesto. Today, Maserati is headquartered in Modena, while its owner is none other than the FCA Group, which also has the likes of Jeep, Fiat, and Alfa Romeo as part of its portfolio. Speaking of ownership, Maserati had a rough patch when it comes to who owned the company. In 1937, it was sold to Adolfo Orsi’s family, who brought the brand on a successful course in motorsports. Believe it or not, Citroën took ownership of Maserati in 1968, but after the French firm went bankrupt in 1974, Maserati was put into liquidation. Thanks to an agreement with the Ministry of Industry in Rome, Maserati landed in the backyard of state-owned holding company GEPI and Alejandro de Tomaso, which was named president and CEO of Maserati. But stability was far from attained. In 1993, de Tomaso sold his 51% stake in Maserati to Fiat, which would become the sole owner of Maserati and pumped substantial investments into the company in an attempt to make it both profitable and desirable once again. Come 1997, Fiat sold a 50% share in Maserati to Ferrari and by 1999, the Prancing Horse took full control and turned Maserati into its luxury division. Things wouldn’t last here either, because in 2005, Maserati and Ferrari parted ways, with the latter going under the Fiat Group umbrella, together with Alfa Romeo, under the same form of organisation that we know today.

Car For Sale: Unique 1959 Maserati 3500 GT By Frua

Car For Sale: Unique 1959 Maserati 3500 GT By Frua

This was Frua’s take at the 3500 GT and Maserati didn’t like it but we do

The Maserati 3500 GT is, arguably, Maserati’s first stab at building a mass-market grand tourer that could challenge both Ferrari as well as its British peers. Many coachbuilders submitted designs to Maserati before the 3500 GT was put into series production and Pietro Frua came forth with proposals for both a fixed-head coupe as well as a convertible.

This very car was his idea of a topless 3500 GT and it is unique because, as it happened, Maserati chose Vignale’s design instead. The car is back on the auction block after previously being among the headliners at Monterey in 2017.

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Now you Can See How Frank Stephenson Designed the Maserati MC12

Now you Can See How Frank Stephenson Designed the Maserati MC12

Here’s how the iconic Maserati MC12 was designed

Car designer Frank Stephenson joined YouTube a few months back to showcase some of his designs. He already discussed how he designed the modern Mini Cooper, the Ferrari F430, the Ford Escort Cosworth rear spoiler, the BMW X5, and the modern Fiat 500 over five episodes. The sixth episode is now online, and it shows us how he designed one of the greatest Italian supercars ever produced. No, it’s not another Ferrari, but it’s based on one. I’m talking about the Maserati MC12.

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2004 - 2005 Maserati MC12

2004 - 2005 Maserati MC12

Officially founded in 1914, Maserati built its first race car only 12 years later, in 1926. From then onward, the Italian brand grew to become one of the most successful race-car manufacturers, dominating the tracks the world over with cars such as the 250F, 200S, 1956-1958 Maserati 300S, 450S, and the 1959-1960 Maserati Tipo 61 "Birdcage." Maserati retired from factory racing in 1957, but continued to supply race cars to privateers until the late 1960s. Meanwhile, it focused on building sporty and luxurious road cars, rivaling products from Ferrari and Aston Martin. It was only in 2004 that Modena returned to factory racing.

That’s when the MC12, Maserati’s only modern supercar, was born.

Built on the same chassis Ferrari used for the Enzo supercar (launched in 2002), the MC12 was actually a secondary project to Maserati’s FIA GT-spec race car, being developed as an homologation vehicle.

Built in very limited quantities, the MC12 was radically different than the Enzo as far as aerodynamics go. Though not as aggressive as the race car it was based on, the MC12 was unique in this regard, as all the other mainstream supercar manufacturers focus on products specifically built for road use. While the road-going MC12 had certain modifications that made it more suitable for day-to-day driving, it had everything it needed to become a full-fledged race car except for a roll cage.

Updated 9/1/2015: Our man Jonathan Lopez took some pics at Monterey Car Week. Enjoy!

Keep reading to find out more about the Maserati MC12.

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Maserati's “All-New” MC20-Bound Nettuno V-6 Engine Is Shrouded in Lies and Deceit

Maserati’s “All-New” MC20-Bound Nettuno V-6 Engine Is Shrouded in Lies and Deceit

It looks like there’s some Ferrari and Alfa Romeo DNA in Maserati’s Nettuno engine after all

For years, Maserati has been buying engines from Ferrari to power its cars. It wasn’t a bad arrangement at all, really, but that’s also why the recent news that it was building its own all-new engine – known as the Nettuno V-6 – in house was such a big deal. It’s finally starting to look like Maserati is staking its own independence from Maranello, but now, it looks like the Nettuno engine isn’t as all-new as Maserati led us all to believe.

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The Maserati MC20 Is Coming Soon - Here's What You Can Expect

The Maserati MC20 Is Coming Soon - Here’s What You Can Expect

The spiritual successor to the iconic Maserati MC12 is finally coming!

Originally scheduled to debut in May 2020, the highly anticipated Maserati MC20 was postponed due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. Rumors hinted at a September unveiled, and it seems they were right. Maserati just confirmed on Twitter that the sports car will break cover on September 9. The announcement comes with a short video teaser showing the MC20’s silhouette, but official details remain under wraps.

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Report: Maserati's New Twin-Turbo V-6 Will Produce a Cool 542 Horsepower

Report: Maserati’s New Twin-Turbo V-6 Will Produce a Cool 542 Horsepower

Maserati is working on a new twin-turbo V-6 that will replace the Ferrari-built V-8

The fact that Maserati’s upcoming MC20 sports car will feature a twin-turbo, 3.0-liter V-6 is no longer a secret, but we finally know how much power it will develop. What’s more, it seems that the V-6 will find its way into other Maserati vehicles too.

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Maserati Just Showcased an MC20 Prototype Dedicated to Sir Stirling Moss

Maserati Just Showcased an MC20 Prototype Dedicated to Sir Stirling Moss

We still don’t get to see much of the design, though.

The fact that Maserati is working on a new supercar – the MC20 – isn’t a well-kept secret. In fact, Maserati has teased a camouflaged model a couple of times. Now, the company has shown off the prototype once again, this time with unique dedication to none other than Sir Stirling Moss himself.

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Excited about the new Maserati MC20? Here's All mid-engined Maseratis from the past

Excited about the new Maserati MC20? Here’s All mid-engined Maseratis from the past

The MC20 will be the fourth road-legal Maserati with a midship layout

Maserati has confirmed that a new mid-engined sports car is underway in 2020. Although the official unveiling was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the new MC20 will arrive by the end of the year. The MC20 won’t be a successor to the MC12 though. Instead of a highly exclusive supercar, Maserati is preparing a more affordable sports car that will probably go against the Ferrari F8 Tributo and the McLaren 720S. It will also be the company’s first mid-engined car since 2005, the first in 15 years as of 2020. A rare bird among Maserati’s long list of front-engined cars, the MC20 will become one of only seven midship vehicles built by the company in its long existence.

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An Italian, Twin-Turbo V-6 Will Breath Life Into the 2021 Maserati MC20

An Italian, Twin-Turbo V-6 Will Breath Life Into the 2021 Maserati MC20

Its unveiling was postponed until September

Maserati is now mostly known for high-performance grand tourers and sedan, but it has build some mid-engine vehicles back in the day too. The most recent example is the incredible MC12, which has already evolved into an expensive classic. Maserati will launch its first mid-engined vehicle in 2021, 16 years after the MC12 was discontinued. It will be called the MC20 and word has it power will come from a twin-turbo V-6 engine.

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Novitec Transforms The Maserati Levante Trofeo Into World's Fastest SUV

Novitec Transforms The Maserati Levante Trofeo Into World’s Fastest SUV

With extra power and a lowered body stance, the SUV is now faster than the Bentley Bentayga!

The Maserati Levante Trofeo has the genes of a Ferrari. That itself says a lot. And, until the Ferrari Purosangue arrives, this is the closest thing we have to a Ferrari SUV. The Levante Trofeo is an exotic SUV that looks stunning on the outside, reeks of luxury on the inside, and has the engine that makes it one of the fastest SUVs on sale today.

Now, imagine everything being raised by a notch. Aftermarket tuner Novitec has laid its hands on Maserati’s latest SUV, the Levante Trofeo and gave it a twist inside out. Called the Levante Esteso V2, it comes with over 600 horses and is now the world’s fastest SUV, beating the mighty Bentley Bentayga.

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Maserati Launches the Edizione Ribelle Special Edition Models, based on the Ghibli, Levante, and Quattroporte

Maserati Launches the Edizione Ribelle Special Edition Models, based on the Ghibli, Levante, and Quattroporte

Italian automaker has eyes sets on a sunnier 2020 after a gloomy 2019

Maserati is making dramatic moves in 2020 to boost sales of its vehicles after an abysmal sales year last year that saw Maserati sell only 11,000 models for the entire year. In an effort to boost sales, the Italian automaker is slashing prices for the 2020 models of the Ghibli, Levante, and Quattroporte. Just as important, Maserati is also offering the new Edizione Ribelle special edition units involving the three aforementioned models. Only 225 units of the Edition Ribelle will be built, spread out across the three models. Of that total, 100 units each of the Levante and Ghibli will receive the Edition Ribelle treatment while only 25 units of the Quattroporte will get the same. The limited-production Edizione Ribelle models will hit dealerships this March. Prices for these models are a lot more expensive than their standard edition counterparts, so expect to pay anywhere from $93,285 to $120,985 if you want to get your hands on a Maserati Edizione Ribelle.

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2020 Maserati MilleMiglia Concept

2020 Maserati MilleMiglia Concept

Hopefully the preview for Maserati’s next all-out supercar

If you ever looked at the Ferrari Monza SP1 and thought to yourself that Maserati, the once-great Italian supercar maker that’s nowadays stuck with sub-standard SUVs and luxury sedans, should make something similar, your prayers have been heard. Sadly, not by Maserati but by freelance designer Luca Serafini who came up with this. If there’s still good left in the world, the MilleMiglia Concept will become a reality.

Imagine taking the best design cues from legendary Maserati models such as the 250F and 6CM, mix in a little bit of McLaren Elva and a sprinkle of Infiniti’s Prototype 10 and you end up with the bold, curvaceous, and utterly beautiful Maserati MilleMiglia Concept. As the name suggests, it would be perfect for a dash down Italy’s tight and twisting B roads, if only it were real...

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What is the Cheapest Maserati?

The cheapest Maserati you can get in the US is the Ghibli, priced from $75,480. In Germany, things are quite similar, in the sense that the Ghibli is also the most affordable (we wouldn’t say cheap) model in Maserati’s lineup, with a starting price tag of €69,300. That being said, there’s not really such thing as a cheap Maserati.

What is the Sportiest Maserati?

The sportiest Maserati, if we are to ignore the high-maintenance MC12, is the GranTurismo. It packs a 4.7-liter high-revving V-8 good for 454 horsepower and 384 pound-feet of torque, allowing it to sprint from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 4.8 seconds and top out at 186 mph (300 km/h). Coming back to the MC12, it packs a 6-liter

derived V-12 powerplant pushing out 621 horsepower at 7,500 rpm and 481 pound-feet of torque at 5,500 rpm. Top speed is a whopping 205 mph (330 km/h) while the 0-62 mph (100 km/h) interval is cleared in 3.8 seconds.

What is the Most Popular Maserati?

The most popular Maserati is the Levante SUV, which in 2018 was sold in 18,447 units across the world. It was followed by the likes of Ghibli (11,220), Quattroporte (3,505), and GranTurismo/GranCabrio (1,699). If we are to ignore the sales figures and look at the brand’s legacy, then it would be hard to pinpoint an exact model. Perhaps the MC12 could be named the most popular Maserati, since it’s the most extreme road-going car to wear the trident logo.

What is the Most Expensive Maserati?

The most expensive Maserati you can buy today is the GranTurismo Convertible ($150,980) or, how they call it in Europe, the GranCabrio (€144,320). Also worth mentioning is that the Maserati MC12 came with a price tag of $1.5 million. So, there’s that.

What is the Fastest Maserati?

The fastest Maserati on sale today is the GranTurismo, which can sprint from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 4.8 seconds and hit 186 mph (300 km/h). However, the Maserati MC12 was able to clear the same interval in 3.8 seconds and top out at 205 mph (330 km/h).

Are Maserati Cars Reliable?

Maserati cars are not that reliable, if we are to be perfectly honest. Back in 2015, Maserati was named one of the most unreliable brands in Britain and one year later, WarrantyDirect placed it on the 36th position out of 36 in its reliability survey. Things are not particularly rosy if we look at ReliabilityIndex, who gave Maserati the Poor rating after the Italian carmaker managed to score an index of 697.