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2021 Maserati MC20

2021 Maserati MC20

Maserati returns to the supercar market with a twin-turbo, V-6 coupe

The 2021 Maserati MC20 is a mid-engined supercar that the Italian company unveiled in September 2020. The brand’s first supercar since 2005, the MC20 is considered a spiritual successor to the MC12, although the two are far from related. Not only the 2021 Maserati MC20 is smaller, but it’s also powered by a twin-turbo V-6 engine instead of a V-12, and it features a less aggressive exterior design. The 2021 Maserati MC20 is likely aimed at supercars like the Ferrari F8 Tributo, McLaren 720S, and Lamborghini Huracan Evo. The 2021 MC20 is powered by a twin-turbo, 3.0-liter V-6 that’s described as "100% Maserati." However, this mill is actually loosely based on Ferrari’s F154 V-8 engine and features parts from other FCA powerplants. The 2021 MC is Maserati’s fourth production mid-engined vehicle, following the Bora (1971-1978), Merak (1972-1983), and MC12 (2004-2005). Let’s find out more about the 2021 Maserati MC20 in the review below.

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1954 Maserati A6GCS by Fiandri & Malagoli

1954 Maserati A6GCS by Fiandri & Malagoli

The kind of car that gets you weak in the knees when you lay eyes on it

Maserati’s 200S, 300S, and 450S proved the once-great Maserati factory could still play with the big boys on any turf in the World Sports Car Championship but it was the unassuming, yet painfully gorgeous, A6GCS from 1953 that announced Maserati’s mid-50s sports car onslaught.

Part of the A6 family of models that dates back to the ’40s, the A6GCS was powered by a 170 horsepower engine at first. Only 52 were ever built and this particular example finished third overall in the 1954 Mille Miglia.

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2019 Maserati Gran Turismo Zeda

2019 Maserati Gran Turismo Zeda

Italian automaker creates one-off piece to celebrate the GranTurismo’s production run

Maserati is ending production of the current-generation GranTurismo by rolling out the GranTurismo Zeda, a one-off creation that commemorates the model’s more-than-a-decade-long run in the market. The Maserati GranTurismo Zeda comes with a lot of exclusive touches, none more prominent than a unique paint finish that separates its aesthetics from just about every GranTurismo model that has hit the market in the last 12 years. There are currently no plans to offer the Maserati GranTurismo Zeda to the public, but a limited-production run in the future hasn’t been ruled out quite yet.

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2018 Maserati GranCabrio by Pogea Racing

2018 Maserati GranCabrio by Pogea Racing

Aftermarket Nip and Tuck For The Astoundingly Looking GranCabrio and GranTurismo

German tuning company Pogea Racing crafted an all-new tuning kit for the Maserati GranCabrio, and consequently, for the Gran Turismo. The dated Italian sports car from Maserati is on its last legs on the market. We can expect discontinuation as early as next year, but that did not stop Pogea Racing from creating a one of a kind tuning kit for what is, probably, one of the most beautiful designs in the history of the automobile. Based around the GranCabrio, the Pogea Racing kit includes suspension tweaks, an engine upgrade, and interior modifications. External body kit? None of that I am afraid; however, the Maserati GranCabrio and the GranTurismo are already astoundingly beautiful.

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1975 Maserati Bora 4.7

1975 Maserati Bora 4.7

Maserati’s classy move to the wadge shape in the Citroen days

The Maserati Bora, a classic Giugiaro design, is the first mid-engine sports car to come from Maserati and the bigger brother of the more well-known Merak, which massively outsold and outlived the Bora. Less than 600 were made, all with V-8 engines.

The birth of the Lamborghini Miura took the world by storm. It produced shock waves that rocked all the big names in the world of sports car manufacturing. Basically, after the Miura, everyone had to have a mid-engine supercar in its lineup. Alejandro De Tomaso came up with the Mangusta which followed the latest trends in design which dictated that the body should have a lot of straight surfaces and razor-sharp edges which would, in turn, reduce drag and make the whole thing look incredible. You can thank Marcello Gandini for this trend, the Italian designer behind the Miura who quickly moved on to a more futuristic design language with the Alfa-Romeo Carabo which was exhibited at the Paris Motor Show 50 years ago.

Maserati, who were still employing their elegant Ghibli, a quintessential grand tourer through and through, decided they should have a mid-engine car too. Ghibli’s designer Giorgetto Giugiaro, of Italdesign, was phoned up and, by mid-1969, the Bora prototype was in its testing phase. The finished product was gorgeous to look at, and an advertised top speed of over 170 mph was astonishing at the time. It was also a car that you could drive for extended periods of time thanks to the comfortable cabin and many amenities that weren’t too common in supercars.

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1956 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta Zagato

1956 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta Zagato

A cool alternative to the Ferrari 250 SWB

Introduced in 1947, the A6 isn’t your regular car nameplate. Unlike most badges, it was used for a variety of models, including both road-legal and race-spec vehicles, as well as single-seat race cars. Although production lasted ten years, the A6 is a rare gem, especially in A6G 2000 Zagato trim. It’s so rare and desirable that RM Sotheby’s estimates that it will be able to auction one for at least $4.25 million.

Developed to replace the 6CM race car, the A6, in which A is for Alfieri Maserati and 6 for six cylinders, also spawned a road-legal car. The first one to arrive was the A6 1500, but the updated A6G 2000 model was far more successful. In 1954, the A6G 2000 was updated, changing its name to the A6G/54. Originally bodied by Frua and Allemano, the A6G 2000 also received a Zagato body in 1956, a collaboration that resulted in a lighter and more aerodynamic car. Not just beautiful to look at, the Zagato-designed A6G 2000 also had a successful racing career.

This particular model, which will go under the hammer in August 2018, competed at the Mille Miglia in 1956 and it’s one of only 20 cars ever built. Extensively documented by marque historian Adolfo Orsi Jr., it went through a two-year restoration and won two awards at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, plus another one at the 2015 Villa d’Este Concorso d’Eleganza. Yes, this one’s in mint condition and as special as they get, so it’s not surprising that it could fetch in excess of $4 million.

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2018 Maserati Levante GTS

2018 Maserati Levante GTS

A Ferrari V-8 under the hood makes it just that much better

Maserati’s full-size luxury performance SUV was first unveiled as the Kubang concept at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 2011. The production model was then officially unveiled at the Geneva International Motor Show as the Levante. When it finally broke cover, the details were impressive - the exterior was pure Italian premium goodness, the cabin was opulent and well-appointed, and a sizable dose of adrenaline lay in wait under the hood. Now, there’s even more fun to be had with the release of the go-faster Levante GTS, which promises tons of performance cues both inside and out, as well as Ferrari-style grunt with every stab of the loud pedal.

Revealed at the 2018 Goodwood Festival of Speed in the U.K., the Levante GTS is offered as the penultimate model in the Levante lineup, slotting in just below the Levante Trofeo. As such, the GTS looks to bring much of the same good stuff, but without the over-the-top approach of the SUV flagship. Read on to find out how it manages a balancing act like that.

Updated 07/13/2018: The Maserati Levante GTS is here! Check out our full written review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2019 Maserati Levante GTS.

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2018 Maserati GranTurismo

2018 Maserati GranTurismo

One final update for the 10-year-old grand tourer

The Maserati GranTurismo was introduced in 2007 a replacement for the Coupe, which in turn was the first grand tourer developed under Ferrari ownership. Offered in both coupe and convertible body styles, the GranTurismo was designed by Pininfarina and launched with two V-8 engines co-developed with Ferrari. A 4.2-liter V-8 powered the base model, while a bigger, 4.7-liter V-8 was offered in the S, MC Stradale, and Sport models. Although it was believed that the GranTurismo would be replaced altogether in in 2018, Maserati launched a new update in 2017.

Essentially a facelift, the 2018-model-year upgrade brings revised aerodynamics on the outside and new technology on the inside. The Italians also changed the drivetrain lineup, ditching the 4.2-liter V-8 as well as the MC Stradale model. From now on, the GranTurismo is available in only two trim levels, the Sport and the MC. Unfortunately, output remains unchanged, which means that the grand tourer might not be around for too long. Find out what’s new in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Maserati GranTurismo.

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