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This Video About the Maserati MC12 Will Remind You Of Better Times

This Video About the Maserati MC12 Will Remind You Of Better Times

One of the most under-appreciated Italian supercars of all time gets the love it deserves

The Maserati MC12 is arguably one of the most underrated supercars of all time. Produced in limited quantities back in 2004 — only 50 were built — the MC12 was a two-seater supercar that Maserati built to comply with homologation requirements so it could enter the FIA GT Championship with a race-spec version of the same car. Sixteen years later, not a lot of people remember the MC12 or even its shared history with the much more famous Ferrari Enzo. Fortunately, Petrolicious’ original series Homologation Specials did not forget about the MC12 and its impact in the supercar world. It doesn’t get as much love and respect as the Enzo, but the MC12 should be remembered better than it has been. It wasn’t the best car to drive, and it was oft-criticized for being too big, but the MC12’s place in the annals of Italian performance cars is secure, or at least it should be.

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The Maserati MC20 May Be Cool But It's No MC12 Follow-Up

The Maserati MC20 May Be Cool But It’s No MC12 Follow-Up

Lacking in almost all areas including price, exclusivity, and performance, the MC20 is just another supercar

The Maserati MC20 is the first supercar to come from the legendary Modenese automaker since the mid-’00s and, right as it arrived, the MC20 has sprung comparison after comparison with Maserati’s last mid-engined creation, the MC12. Many have already labeled the MC20 as the ’spiritual successor of the MC12,’ but we beg to differ.

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Maserati MC20 vs Maserati MC12

Maserati MC20 vs Maserati MC12

We’re comparing Maserati’s modern flagship supercars

Maserati just unveiled the MC20, its first proper sports car in more than a decade. Launched some 14 years after the iconic MC12 was discontinued, the MC20 is considered by many a spiritual successor to the

Ferrari Enzo

based supercar. But is this new car a proper successor to the MC12? Does it have what it takes to fill the void left after the MC12 was discontinued? Let’s find out in the comparison below.

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Maserati MC20 Fast Facts and Photo Gallery

Maserati MC20 Fast Facts and Photo Gallery

While 2020 has been a dramatic, dark, and twisted year for most automakers, Maserati is hoping to make the best of the latter half, and it all starts with the car you see here – the all-new MC20 sports car. As a spiritual successor to the MC12, the MC20 carries around some significant DNA of its ancestor – predominantly located in the front end – a pair of wide-opening butterfly doors, and features a mid-engine configuration. That engine, by the way, is an all-new unit built by the company (instead of Maserati borrowing from Ferrari yet again – that displaces 3.0-liters and pumps out a total of 621 horsepower and 538 pound-feet of torque. These figures, ladies and gentlemen, make it the most powerful production car to come from Maserati to date, just barely beating out the MC12 some 15 years later.

With that said, we still have a whole lot to share with you, but we couldn’t wait to share all the new high-res images with you, so scroll through the slider above, or check out all the images a little further down the page. Feel free to download any that you like, as they’ll definitely make great wallpapers!

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Now you Can See How Frank Stephenson Designed the Maserati MC12

Now you Can See How Frank Stephenson Designed the Maserati MC12

Here’s how the iconic Maserati MC12 was designed

Car designer Frank Stephenson joined YouTube a few months back to showcase some of his designs. He already discussed how he designed the modern Mini Cooper, the Ferrari F430, the Ford Escort Cosworth rear spoiler, the BMW X5, and the modern Fiat 500 over five episodes. The sixth episode is now online, and it shows us how he designed one of the greatest Italian supercars ever produced. No, it’s not another Ferrari, but it’s based on one. I’m talking about the Maserati MC12.

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2004 - 2005 Maserati MC12

2004 - 2005 Maserati MC12

Officially founded in 1914, Maserati built its first race car only 12 years later, in 1926. From then onward, the Italian brand grew to become one of the most successful race-car manufacturers, dominating the tracks the world over with cars such as the 250F, 200S, 1956-1958 Maserati 300S, 450S, and the 1959-1960 Maserati Tipo 61 "Birdcage." Maserati retired from factory racing in 1957, but continued to supply race cars to privateers until the late 1960s. Meanwhile, it focused on building sporty and luxurious road cars, rivaling products from Ferrari and Aston Martin. It was only in 2004 that Modena returned to factory racing.

That’s when the MC12, Maserati’s only modern supercar, was born.

Built on the same chassis Ferrari used for the Enzo supercar (launched in 2002), the MC12 was actually a secondary project to Maserati’s FIA GT-spec race car, being developed as an homologation vehicle.

Built in very limited quantities, the MC12 was radically different than the Enzo as far as aerodynamics go. Though not as aggressive as the race car it was based on, the MC12 was unique in this regard, as all the other mainstream supercar manufacturers focus on products specifically built for road use. While the road-going MC12 had certain modifications that made it more suitable for day-to-day driving, it had everything it needed to become a full-fledged race car except for a roll cage.

Updated 9/1/2015: Our man Jonathan Lopez took some pics at Monterey Car Week. Enjoy!

Keep reading to find out more about the Maserati MC12.

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Maserati's “All-New” MC20-Bound Nettuno V-6 Engine Is Shrouded in Lies and Deceit

Maserati’s “All-New” MC20-Bound Nettuno V-6 Engine Is Shrouded in Lies and Deceit

It looks like there’s some Ferrari and Alfa Romeo DNA in Maserati’s Nettuno engine after all

For years, Maserati has been buying engines from Ferrari to power its cars. It wasn’t a bad arrangement at all, really, but that’s also why the recent news that it was building its own all-new engine – known as the Nettuno V-6 – in house was such a big deal. It’s finally starting to look like Maserati is staking its own independence from Maranello, but now, it looks like the Nettuno engine isn’t as all-new as Maserati led us all to believe.

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Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

The car for which the Balance of Performance was created

In GT racing, the Maserati MC12 is remembered as a ferociously effective car in the GT1 class, racking up numerous race wins and titles in the now-defunct FIA GT Championship. With a career spanning seven seasons, it was the car to beat in Europe but it never caused much of a stir in North-America. Risi Competizione first campaigned one with help from AF Corse in 2005 with special dispensation from IMSA. It stood out and this was no mean feat given it shared grids with the Saleen S7, the Aston Martin DBR9, the Corvette C6.R, and the Dodge Viper GTS-R but it never delivered on its promise. Two years later, in 2007, storied Swiss-American squad Doran Lista brought the MC12 back to the American Le Mans Series and the car you see here is that exact car driven twice in the ALMS 12 years ago. We know you want it and so do we.

The Maserati MC12 is one of those cars that divides opinions: some consider it to be ridiculous with its race car-inspired physique that reminds you more of a ’90s homologation special model such as Porsche’s 911 GT1 rather than a ’00s supercar while others can’t stop praising both its appearance and its performance. On the race tracks, though, there was no room for such arguments: the MC12 was the dominant force in the FIA GT between 2005 and 2009 with Michael Bartels’ Team Vitaphone becoming the de facto Maserati team during the car’s tenure at the top of the GT1 pile. But can a car that never competed at Le Mans and that was never competitive in America really be considered great? Share with us your opinions in the comment section below, but not before you go through the story of this unique racer.

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2016 Maserati MC12 VC By Edo Competition

2016 Maserati MC12 VC By Edo Competition

Now this is a tuning build that’s worth the price of admission

Twelve years ago, Maserati signalled its intention to return to motor racing by launching the limited-run MC12 supercar. Derived from the Ferrari Enzo – the MC12’s cousin, by all intents and purposes – the MC12 is arguably one of the rarest Maseratis in history with only 50 units made for production. Even rarer was the MC12 Versione Corse, a 12-unit, 745-horsepower, race-tuned variant of the MC12 that was developed strictly for private use on a race track. It’s unclear where all 12 of the MC12 VC units are today, but one version of the standard MC12 happens to be in the hands of Edo Competition, the same aftermarket and racing outfit that gifted the world with the Ferrari Enzo ZXX Evoluzione. Put one and one together and you start to get an idea on what Edo has in store for the MC12. Here’s a hint: MC12 Versione Corse.

Yes, Edo Competition did what you’re thinking. It converted a “standard” Maserati MC12, turning in into a close representation of the super rare MC12 VC, right down to actually bringing the weight down and increasing its power, all while still making the car eligible to be used on public roads, something the original MC12 VC isn’t allowed to do.

The project took over two years to complete and as Edo puts it, the project was attached with the “highest expectations of quality” and that the tuner was in a “tight schedule” to get it up to the lofty standards of Edo itself. This wasn’t going to be a simple cut-and-color modification; it was going to be an exhaustive exercise in patience and fortitude.

Fortunately, Edo Competition is known for those two things and when work started on June 2014, it put all of its expertise to good use to make the transformation as real as possible.

Here now then is the result of all that handwork. This is Edo Competition’s Maserati MC12 VC and it is glorious.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Edo Maserati MC12 VC.

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2006 Maserati MC12 Corsa

2006 Maserati MC12 Corsa

Maserati’s very own Ferrari FXX

In 2004, five years after Ferrari took full control of the Maserati brand, the Modena-based company unleashed the MC12, a limited-edition supercar based on the Ferrari Enzo. Created to homologate the GT1 racing variant for the FIA GT Championship, the MC12 was produced until 2005 in only 50 examples. In 2006, Maserati introduced one last version of the MC12, the Corsa. Developed from the race-spec GT1, the Corsa was intended for private use, but like the GT1 it was also restricted to the race track, as its modifications made it illegal to drive on public roads.

Created "in response to the customer demand to own the MC12 racing car and fueled by the growth in track days, where owners can drive their cars at high speeds in the safety of a race track," the MC12 Corsa was sold to private customers in a similar fashion to the Enzo-based Ferrari FXX. While each owner paid in excess of $1 million to buy an MC12 Corsa, they only drove them on specially organized track days. Outside these events, the cars were stored and maintained by Maserati.

Only twelve MC12 Corsas were built and they all shared several specifications with the GT1 race car, including the uprated engine. Another three vehicles were produced for testing, while a fourth extra chassis was used for the Birdcage 75th, a concept car showcased at the 2005 Geneva Motor Show.

Continue reading to learn more about the Maserati MC12 Corsa.

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Maserati Boomerang Concept Will Be Auctioned In September

Maserati Boomerang Concept Will Be Auctioned In September

Italian concept cars of the 1970s were how the future was supposed to look. It’s the era that brought us the 1973-1990 Lamborghini Countach, the Lancia Stratos Zero Concept, the Lancia Sibilo concept and Pininfarina’s 1970 Ferrari 512S Modulo concept (Marcello Gandini designed all of these with the exception of the Ferrari). Add the 1972 Maserati Boomerang by Giugiaro to that list. The sole example will cross the auction block at the Bonhams event in September in Chantilly, France.

Originally shown at the Turin Motor Show in 1971 as an epowood mockup, the Maserati Boomerang wears a futuristic body penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro. It was designed shortly after he co-founded Italdesign Giugiaro, following stints at both Bertone and Ghia. It later reappeared at the 1972 Geneva Motor Show as a fully functional car built on the chassis of the Maserati Bora.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2005 Maserati MC12 Corsa Can Be Yours For $3 Million

2005 Maserati MC12 Corsa Can Be Yours For $3 Million

Introduced in 2004, the Maserati MC12 — essentially a re-bodied Ferrari Enzo — was built in only 55 units through 2005. Five of them remained with Maserati for its FIA GT Championship program, which puts the MC12, with its only 50 retailed units, among the rarest supercars ever built. Needless to say, you’d have more luck at finding one of the 400 Ferrari Enzos for sale nowadays.

However, there’s a specific version of the MC12 that’s even rarer. I’m talking about the MC12 Corse, a track-confined supercar built for customer use. To make it simple, think of it as the equivalent of the Enzo-based Ferrari FXX. Only 12 were built and sold for $1.47 million to select customers. Much like Ferrari did with the FXX, Maserati was responsible for the storage and maintenance of the cars, with their respective owners driving them on specially organized track days only.

That said, purchasing an MC12 Corsa is likely next to impossible, with very few customers willing to let their prized and rare supercars go. However, a near-mint example is currently for sale at Ferrari-Maserati of Ft. Lauderdale, and get this, it has only 55 miles on the odometer and perfect paint. There’s no information as to whom owned the vehicle until now, but the dealership will be more than happy to part with this piece of Maserati racing history for $2,999,900. That’s LaFerrari FXX K money right there!

Click "Continue Reading" to learn more about the Maserati MC12 Corsa.

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Maserati Says There Won't be a LaFerrari-Based Supercar

Maserati Says There Won’t be a LaFerrari-Based Supercar

Shortly after Ferrari unveiled the LaFerrari supercar, it was rumored that Maserati would unveil a supercar based on the LaFerrari. The model was supposed to be a successor for the 2004 MC12 supercar and we assumed it would arrive in 2015.

An announcement by company Maserati Harald J Wester in a recent interview with AutoExpress confirmed that the company isn’t planning to build a hypercar based on the Ferrari LaFerrari.

Instead, Maserati will focus on developing the new-generation GranCabrio and GranTurismo. After these two are finished, there will also be a new smaller sports car. However, contrary to previous rumors, the new sports car won’t be based on the Alfa Romeo 4C because this will require "to create a more sporty, all-new body for Maserati."

The new sports car will be a two-seat model and will be smaller in size when compared to the next GranTurismo.

Click past the jump to read more about Maserati’s future sports car.

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