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2018 Mazda RX-7

2018 Mazda RX-7

After many years of rumors, Mazda has finally confirmed that the beloved RX-7 will get a successor by the end of the decade. The confirmation came at the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show, where the Japanese brand unveiled the RX-VISION, a front-engined, RWD concept that sports an aggressive interpretation of Mazda’s KODO design language. What’s more, the company also confirmed it will have a new-generation rotary engine under the hood.

Mazda didn’t say when the production car will arrive in showrooms, but it seems that the next-gen RX-7’s development depends on how fast the engineers can come up with a reliable and fuel-efficient Wankel powerplant. More details should become available in 2016, but until that happens, we created a rendering of the production vehicle, as well as a speculative review about what the next-gen RX-7 might bring to the table.

Update 12/07/2017: Mazda has been caught testing the next-gen Wankel engine. Unfortunately, it was being testing in an older RX-8 shell instead of a full-body prototype of the next-gen RX-7, but it’ll do for now. The good news is that it is practically confirmation that a next-gen RX is, indeed, on the way. Check out our spy shots section below to see the RX-8 prototype with the next-gen Wankel and to hear what we know.

Continue reading to find out more about the 2018 Mazda RX-7.

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1981 Mazda RX-7 TWR Race Car

1981 Mazda RX-7 TWR Race Car

Among the most famous wins in motorsports history is Mazda’s 1991 win at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The 1991 Mazda 787B racecar claimed the first, and still only win for a Japanese manufacturer at Le Mans, as well as the only win from a car with a rotary engine. But there was another car that paved the way for the 787B, another rotary-engined car that won a 24-hour endurance race a full decade before Mazda’s win at Le Mans, and that car is an RX-7 belonging to Tom Walkinshaw Racing.

In 1981, the RX-7 was still a pretty new car, having only just debuted in 1979. It wasn’t completely new to motorsports, and had even grabbed a class win at the 1979 24 Hours of Daytona, similar to the kind of success enjoyed by earlier Mazda rotary racing cars. But in 1980, Mazda and Tom Walkinshaw entered the 24 Hours of Spa Francorchamps. It wasn’t an impressive year for the RX-7s at Spa, but the lessons learned were put to good use, and in 1981, TWR grabbed an overall win at Spa, finally providing really solid evidence of the performance potential of the Wankel rotary engine.
Continue reading to learn more about the 1981 Mazda RX-7 TWR Race Car.

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2011 Mazda RX-7 by Garage Revolution

2011 Mazda RX-7 by Garage Revolution

Garage Revolution has prepared a very cool Mazda RX-7 for the World Time Attack Challenge. Their RX-7 is powered by a 13B turbo engine that has received a 50mm exhaust manifold, 80mm front pipe, 80mm full titanium exhaust, custom airbox, custom cooling ducts for turbine, MoTeC M2R ECU and boost control solenoid. The result is an impressive 600 HP and with a total weight of 2204 lbs you can only imagine the level of performance it will deliver.

For the exterior the car gets a carbon fiber front bumper, rear bumper and quarter panels, front fenders, side skirts, front and rear canards, rear diffuser, rear hatch, doors, hood and GT Wing; Craft Square dry carbon fiber side mirrors. For the interior Garage Revolution added a roll cage for the driver’s safety, carbon fiber dash, center console, transmission tunnel and floor, custom gear selector and linkage, shift knob, reverse selector; AP Racing air jack kit, brake bias selector and adjustable pedal box.

Hit the jump to watch the video.

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2005 The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift: VeilSide RX-7

2005 The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift: VeilSide RX-7

This RX-7 was built by VeilSide, one of the largest automotive aftermarket companies in Japan. Universal studios bought the car and change it for the movie The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift.

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2001 Mazda RX7

2001 Mazda RX7

The zoom-zoom brand’s prescription for corner-carving vigor

Although it sold in the U.S. for just three short years, the third-generation Mazda RX-7 is widely regarded as one of the best Japanese sports cars of the ‘90s, if not all time. Also known as the FD, the third-gen boasts the same fundamental performance attributes as the first two generations, with world-class handling, a feathery curb weight, and zero reciprocating pistons. However, the FD improves upon the original with a double helping of turbocharged Wankel power, plus one of the sexiest bodies ever produced in the Land of the Rising Sun, and as a result, it’s nothing less than a four-wheeled superstar.

Unsurprisingly, the FD has enjoyed success in a variety of motorsports, including endurance racing, touring cars, rally racing, and in particular, drifting. Its legendary capabilities on the race track have even extended into the realm of fiction, with a slew of appearances throughout automotive pop culture, from movies, to manga, to video games.

Fans of the FD are an enthusiastic bunch, exhibiting an almost fanatical devotion to the eccentricities of this rotary-powered icon. But why? What exactly makes it so incredibly good? Read on for the details.

Continue reading to learn more about 1991 – 2002 Mazda RX-7.

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