1993 McLaren F1

1993 McLaren F1 Exterior
- image 792836
  • McLaren F1
  • Year:
    1993
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    627@7400
  • Torque @ RPM:
    5600
  • Displacement:
    6064 L
  • 0-60 time:
    3.2 sec.
  • Quarter Mile time:
    11.1 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    240 mph
  • 0-100 time:
    6.3 sec.
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:

Arguably the most iconic supercar of the 1990s

The McLaren F1 was unveiled in May 1992 and was the company’s first road-going production car. The idea was born in the late 1980s, when Gordon Murray, the technical director of McLaren’s Formula One, began sketching the F1 as a three-seat supercar. Appointed as head of McLaren Cars in 1991, Murray convinced Ron Dennis to build the vehicle and played a key role in the design of the F1. It was unlike any other supercar launched up to that point. It had a race-inspired design, a three-seat configuration with the driver seat in the middle, and a comfortable ride for a vehicle of its kind. It was also the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis and the first to bring high-tech and expensive materials such as titanium, magnesium, Kevlar, and gold under the same roof.

Not only powerful and quick, the F1 was also the world’s fastest production car. Its record endured from 1992 until 2005, when Bugatti unleashed the ludicrous Veyron. The F1 spawned a couple of special-edition models such as the LM and the GT, but it was also used as a base for the GTR race car. Essentially a standard F1 with aerodynamic improvements, the GTR went on to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in its first year on the race track.

Some 25 years have passed since its introduction and the F1 is already considered a classic. Usually changing owners for millions of dollars, the F1 is one of the very few multi-million-dollar supercars built in the 1990s.

 

Latest McLaren F1 news and reviews:

2018 McLaren F1 GTR ‘25R' Restoration

2018 McLaren F1 GTR ‘25R’ Restoration

This is the first McLaren F1 to be restored and certified by McLaren’s new F1 certification program

McLaren Special Operations may be known for building exclusive one-off creations, but it’s now expanding its workload with the launch of a new certification program for the British automaker’s most iconic model, the F1. Part of the new program’s objectives is to authenticate the history and specification of a specific McLaren F1. Coinciding with the launch of the program is the first McLaren F1 to get fully certified: the 1997 F1 GTR Longtail “25R.”

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Wallpaper Selection of the Day: 1993 McLaren F1

Wallpaper Selection of the Day: 1993 McLaren F1

This legendary icon never strays too far from our hearts

1993 McLaren F1
Read our full review of the 1993 McLaren F1 or check out the gallery below for more wallpapers of this iconic beauty!

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McLaren F1 GTR Is More Than Just a Supercar, It's Also a Christmas Tree Transporter

McLaren F1 GTR Is More Than Just a Supercar, It’s Also a Christmas Tree Transporter

This is something you don’t see everyday

The McLaren F1 GTR is one of the most eye-catching supercars of all time. It’s a magnet for attention, and it’s capable of unfiltered viciousness on the race track. Apparently, it also makes for a handy car during the holiday season, as the owner of the UK’s most recognizable F1 GTR, Andy74b on Instagram, showed us in a recent video.

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McLaren Finally Opens Dedicated Service Center for the F1 Supercar

McLaren Finally Opens Dedicated Service Center for the F1 Supercar

It was a long time coming, but F1 owners in the U.S. now have a go-to place to get maintenance work

When you have a car as important as the McLaren F1, the impetus is to do whatever it can to take care of it, even if it means shipping it to the UK for maintenance purposes. The distance and logistics of shipping the supercar are two of the biggest sources of headaches among F1 owners in the U.S. Fortunately, McLaren finally decided to open the country’s first ever dedicated service center for the almighty exotic. The center will be operated by McLaren Philadelphia but will function independently from the dealership’s main retail facility.

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McLaren F1 Ownership Doesn't come Cheap: Video

McLaren F1 Ownership Doesn’t come Cheap: Video

We’re talking about some serious cheddar here

In a video released by VineWiki Previous F1 owner, Bruce Weiner, goes into the detail of the maintenance costs associated with ownership. Now, naturally, you would have to expect that owning a supercar – especially one of the F1’s caliber at that time – would be costly, but we’re talking about the kind of money that fuels divorce, among other things. In the video, Weiner explains that something like replacing the fuel cell, which needs to be done every five years, will set you back roughly $100,000 – a price tag that doesn’t even include transport or specifics. The clutch? Well, that needs to be replaced every few years or at about 3,000 miles and even changing the tires will set you back $50,000. Of course, that money gets you all the bits and pieces that go along with tire changing on a race car – a day at the track, a driver, the mechanics on site, various insurances, and the necessary suspension tuning and balancing.

Now, whether or not it really is so expensive, really remains to be seen. Weiner paid out $1.2 million for his legendary beast. The owner before him had just paid about $300,000 to have it painted Volcano Orange (a nice choice if we do say so ourselves,) but what really raises the question is how well Mr. Weiner actually knew the car. After all, in the video, he says there were 63 road-going examples when there were really 64, and, in case you didn’t notice, that 6.1-liter V-12 built by BMW wasn’t an “off-the-shelf” engine. Sorry, Weiner, but that engine was built specifically for the F1 and wasn’t used in any other car.

With that in mind, even if it did cost that much to own, what can you expect. It was once the fastest car in the world, and its engine bay is lined in gold. This isn’t your wife’s Mercedes, and it’s not your every day BMW 6 Series. We’re talking about a race car built for the road. Nothing about it was going to be cheap. It’s too bad he let the cost of owning such a fine piece of automotive history ruin the fact that he was sitting on top of one of the greatest cars ever built. Check out the video for yourself below!

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Thanksgiving Day Special – 7 Cars We're Thankful For

Thanksgiving Day Special – 7 Cars We’re Thankful For

Counting our blessings… and horsepower too

Sometimes, it’s easy to get caught up in the hustle of daily life, and in the process, forget about all the good things you’ve got going for you. Thanksgiving is a time to reflect on those blessings, providing an opportunity to be grateful for what you have. For us car lovers, 2017 brought all kinds of new stuff to be thankful for, with a bevy of outrageous hypercars to drool over and bench race. As such, we’ve put together a list of cars we’re thankful for right here for your enjoyment.

While 2017 certainly brought the goods in terms of high-end performance, we had to toss in a few other models as well, ya know, just to remind us how truly fortunate we are. And, per usual, we wanna know what cars you’re thankful for. It doesn’t have to be some top-shelf, 250-mph insane-o machine. Perhaps you’re thankful for your trusty daily driver, which reliably ferries you to and fro without issue. Let us know in the comments. And oh yeah – Happy Thanksgiving!

Continue reading to learn more about the cars we’re thankful for.

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A New But Used McLaren F1 is for Sale and it's like a Wet Dream come True

A New But Used McLaren F1 is for Sale and it’s like a Wet Dream come True

This freaking thing still has the protective wrapping on the inside!!!!!

New but Used…. It’s not a term that you usually hear associated with an automobile, and if you do, it’s usually closer to “like-new” which means it’s pretty much a polished turd that looks just good enough and drives just good enough to trick you into buying it. This time around, however, that scenario is far from true and the car we’re talking about today is a McLaren F1. Naturally, you won’t find a brand-new F1 for sale since they’ve been out of production for some 20 years or so, but you better believe this is about as close as you’ll ever get. And, truth be told, it falls under that “if you have to ask, you can’t afford it” category.

According to Tom Hartley JNR, this F1 is the “lowest mileage F1 in existence,” which could very well be true considering it has just 239 kilometers on the clock – that’s right; 239 kilometers or about 148 miles. That’s all McLaren test miles that take place before delivery, so the rich Japanese man that official commissioned it clearly planned to treat it as an investment instead of the incredible machine it really is. Either way, his loss is someone else’s gain as this thing still has the protective wrapping on the inside which, more or less, is a testament to how mint this Pioneer of the supercar world really is.

In addition to the car itself, the F1 comes with its own list of goodies that include the LM style spare exhaust, and extra GTR steering wheel with an F1 logo, passenger over-carpets, and a windshield strip, all of which remain in the original, factory packaging. You can also add in the fitted luggage to that list as they also reside in their original plastic wrap. Other goodies include a removable steering wheel wrapped in suede, a carbon driver’s seat with an F1 logo and yellow insert, yellow straps on the driver’s seat, and there’s even a hand-painted signature of F1 designed Gordon Murray on the body. Finally, to complete the package, this baby includes the leather-cased owner’s handbooks, a Facom tool chest, tool roll with gold-plated titanium tools (originals, of course,) spare keys, and the accompanying TAG Heuer watch with the matching chassis No. 60 engraved on the face. As a side note, the watch has also never been worn, so you get that rare gem as a still-new collectible as well.

OF course, the dealer doesn’t have a price listed, so you can imagine it’s going to go for a very pretty penny and it may even take a while to sell depending on the offers that come in. To put the importance of an unused model like this into perspective, the first F1 to be imported to the United States was sold for more than $15 million. It included some homologation parts but had been driven somewhere around 10,000 miles before being sold here. With that in mind, how much do you think this undriven example will go for? I bet someone with really deep pockets will shell out somewhere in the $25 million range. Give us your guesses in the comments section below.

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TopSpeed's Top 5 Street Cars With Ridiculous Spec Sheets

TopSpeed’s Top 5 Street Cars With Ridiculous Spec Sheets

The numbers don’t lie

We’re not sure if you’ve noticed, but things have been getting a little out of hand lately. In the never-ending quest to one-up the competition, automakers have unleashed some truly astounding machines upon the world, each packed to the brim with jaw-dropping stats. The numbers these things bring to the table are simply ridiculous – outrageous power, mind-warping speed, and otherworldly performance potential. Any one of these rides will permanently alter your perception of what it means to go fast, even if all you do is digest the numbers. As such, we’ve listed here our top five favorite street cars with simply ridiculous spec sheets.

Obviously, super cars make up the majority of the entries, but we’ve also got the king of the muscle cars and even an all-electric icon on the list as well. Each entry is fully capable of melting face in its own special way, and each serves as a reminder that we are indeed living in a special time. Enthusiasts, say hello to the ultimate bench racers, the four-wheeled monsters bringing the hottest of the heat. Which would you have? Let us know in the comments section below, or post up your pick for the car with the most ridiculous spec sheet.

Continue reading to learn more about TopSpeed’s Top 5 Cars With Ridiculous Spec Sheets.

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McLaren's Customer Service Goes Into Overdrive By Promising A Loaner Engine For F1 Owners

McLaren’s Customer Service Goes Into Overdrive By Promising A Loaner Engine For F1 Owners

Get your McLaren F1 engines repaired by MSO and get a loaner engine in return

McLaren’s customer service is already regarded as one of the best in the business, so this news comes as no big surprise. The British automaker is giving owners of the McLaren F1 the opportunity to have the original BMW-sourced, 6.1-liter V-12 engine fully serviced, yet still have use of the car. How does McLaren do this? Two words: loaner engines.

The whole concept follows McLaren’s reputation for having one of the best full factory support services among all premium automakers in the world. While it’s not impossible for automakers to put in loaner engines on cars that allow them to be driven, it’s unheard of when you consider that the car in question is the McLaren F1. The F1 is largely considered as one of the finest supercars ever developed, despite already being 25 years old. The news came from a Road & Track report indicating McLaren’s MSO division does offer the temporary engine swap, allowing owners of the F1 to continue driving their cars even if the car’s original engine is being repaired or rebuilt at MSO’s factory. Whether owners actually drive their F1s with the loaner engine installed is a separate issue entirely. Some might opt to not risk any potential issues incurred by having a loaner engine in place. Remember, despite the assurance that McLaren still has plenty of original parts and upgrades for the F1, a simple knock or issue on the supercar could spiral into a messy financial black hole for the owner. Maintenance costs run ridiculously high with the F1 and the risk of issues arising is a cause for concern.

Continue after the jump tor read the full story.

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1993 McLaren F1

1993 McLaren F1

Arguably the most iconic supercar of the 1990s

The McLaren F1 was unveiled in May 1992 and was the company’s first road-going production car. The idea was born in the late 1980s, when Gordon Murray, the technical director of McLaren’s Formula One, began sketching the F1 as a three-seat supercar. Appointed as head of McLaren Cars in 1991, Murray convinced Ron Dennis to build the vehicle and played a key role in the design of the F1. It was unlike any other supercar launched up to that point. It had a race-inspired design, a three-seat configuration with the driver seat in the middle, and a comfortable ride for a vehicle of its kind. It was also the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis and the first to bring high-tech and expensive materials such as titanium, magnesium, Kevlar, and gold under the same roof.

Not only powerful and quick, the F1 was also the world’s fastest production car. Its record endured from 1992 until 2005, when Bugatti unleashed the ludicrous Veyron. The F1 spawned a couple of special-edition models such as the LM and the GT, but it was also used as a base for the GTR race car. Essentially a standard F1 with aerodynamic improvements, the GTR went on to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in its first year on the race track.

Some 25 years have passed since its introduction and the F1 is already considered a classic. Usually changing owners for millions of dollars, the F1 is one of the very few multi-million-dollar supercars built in the 1990s.

Read more
What Are The Craziest Supercar Interiors That Money Can Buy?

What Are The Craziest Supercar Interiors That Money Can Buy?

This time, it’s what’s on the inside that counts

We’re gonna be honest here – supercars are just getting ridiculous these days. Let’s start with the performance. We left the 200-mph barrier a long time ago, and the tip-top shelf performance vehicles these days are pushing ever closer to 300 mph thanks to absurd four-figure power numbers, advanced aerodynamics, and spaceship composites under (and over) the skin. Or you could talk about the cost – if you’ve got the connections and the bankroll, it’s not all that difficult to spend millions and millions on just one of these machines. Indeed, the term supercar has taken on new meaning over the past couple years, and that includes evolved cabins to match the insane spec sheets. To celebrate that fact, we’ve assembled the top five craziest supercar interiors that money can buy, right here for your reading and viewing pleasure.

Over the top is a gross understatement when it comes to the following five cars. These things offer levels of opulence usually reserved for mansions, accomplishing the dual goals of looking good and going fast thanks to next-level design, materials, and execution.

Some of them are beautiful, some of them are weird, but all of them are insane in their own special kind of way. Which would you prefer? Or better yet, did we fail to include a crazy supercar interior that tops these five? Let us know in the comments section.

Continue reading to learn more about the craziest supercar interiors that money can buy.

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Pink Floyd's Drummer Crashes His McLaren F1 GTR

Pink Floyd’s Drummer Crashes His McLaren F1 GTR

Goodwood Members’ Meeting didn’t go as planned for Nick Mason

This past weekend, the Goodwood Circuit hosted the 75th Members’ Meeting, which brought (as usual) an impressive lineup of classic and more recent race cars to the iconic British track. Unfortunately, this event also saw a highly collectible car leave the track and slam into an outside wall. I’m talking about a McLaren F1 GTR driven by none other than Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason.

A fan of historic racing and noted classic car collector, Mason took his F1 GTR for a spin on the Goodwood track and things obviously didn’t work that well. Although the video doesn’t provide clues as to how the GTR slammed into the wall, it’s safe to assume that Mason lost control of the powerful race car and went spinning into the green. It doesn’t appear as if he was driving at high speed, but the damage is pretty extensive, with the front bumper, left fender, and left headlamp needing to be replaced now.

This isn’t necessarily an issue since McLaren still provides parts and even takes care of repair process, but bringing the car back to its original state will be pretty expensive. Especially if the suspension and electronics suffered damage too. Okay, so maybe Mason won’t have trouble paying for the repairs, but it’s still painful to see a rare car like this — only 28 were built — take damage. On the other hand, it’s actually good to see that Mason’s F1 GTR gets some track action instead of spending its life in a garage.

Mason, who recently turned 73, is a big classic and race car enthusiast, most known for owning various Ferraris. His collection includes one of the 39 Ferrari GTOs, an Enzo, and a 512S race car, among others.

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Ride Shotgun in the McLaren F1 During its Record-Breaking Run in 1998

Ride Shotgun in the McLaren F1 During its Record-Breaking Run in 1998

It’s been 19 years since the McLaren F1 make its record-breaking run

The McLaren F1 is the legend of legends and is still considered by some to be the best car ever made. It was engineered by a team of hand-picked masterminds with a focus on reduced drag, increased downforce, and mind shattering performance all wrapped up into one sexy package that effectively raised the bar for all supercars that came after it. Not only was it pleasing to look at, but the design itself was pure genius as it accommodates enough downforce that there was no need for a big, bulky spoiler or wing on struts in the rear. With a curb weight of around 2,500 pounds and a 6.1-liter, BMW, V-12 that had 627 horsepower and 480 pound-feet of torque, the McLaren F1 took a dominating toll on the record books in the early 1990s. And that folks, is what brings me to the topic at hand: the F1’s crazy top speed record of 240.1 mph.

To this day, the F1 is still the fastest naturally aspirated road car ever built and is still one of the most exclusive cars in the world. It’s top speed record has since been beaten, but a recently revealed video of the F1s record-breaking speed run comes to remind us of just how amazingly fast the F1 was in a time where fast didn’t come quite as easy as it does today. In the video you’re about to watch, you’ll see Le Mans winner Andy Wallace make several passes at the Ehra-Lessien proving ground, eventually pushing the F1 to the very threshold of its limits. All told the F1 actually hit 391 km, which is 242.956 mph, but because records average out two runs in opposing directions, the record was officially set at 240.1 mph.

In the video, you’ll see the in-car footage of this crazy record being set and can even hear everything Wallace had to say during the process. Once the car creeps over the 220 mph mark, you’ll finally get to see just how scary it really was for Wallace as the car was quite literally ready to take flight and even the slightest wrong move would have ended in disaster. But, that didn’t happen, and now we have the glory of sharing that experience with the man who pushed the F1 and himself to the limit. Click play and enjoy!

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McLaren F1 GTR "Longtail" Turns 20, Gets Artistic Photo Shoot

McLaren F1 GTR "Longtail" Turns 20, Gets Artistic Photo Shoot

British company celebrates 20 years since the F1 was upgraded to "Longtail" specification

The McLaren P1 supercar may be all modern and fancy with its fresh looks and hybrid drivetrain, but F1, which was launched more than decades ago gets nearly as much attention nowadays. Introduced in 1992 as the most innovative supercar of its time, the F1 went racing in 1995 and won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in its maiden season. In November 1996, McLaren rolled out an upgraded GTR "Longtail" model, which wasn’t as successful as the original GTR on the race track but it’s considered one of the most exotic McLarens ever built. With the "Longtail" exactly 20 years old as of November 2016, McLaren celebrates by releasing a handful of high-res pictures of a Gulf-liveried example.

Developed for the 1997 racing season, the GTR "Longtail" featured a much longer nose and rear section, wider fenders and a bigger rear wing. A complete redesign rather than just an update, the "Longtail" boasted improved aerodynamic downforce in order to compete with prototypes such as the Porsche 911 GT1 and Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR. Unlike the exterior, the interior carried over from the standard GTR, but McLaren added a new steering wheel, gear shifter, and center stack.

More changes were operated under the hood, where a stroke reduction brought the BMW-sourced 6.1-liter V-12 down to 6.0 liters in an attempt to prolong its life and improve reliability. The gearbox was also replaced with a new X-trac six-speed sequential transmission with quicker shifts. FIA-spec cars were still limited to the 600-horsepower output imposed by the air restrictor, but cars entered in other series had their engines tweaked to generate as much as 900 horses. For a race car that tipped the scales at only 2,018 pounds, it was downright amazing.

But, despite its redesigned aerodynamics, the F1 GTR "Longtail" was unable to compete with the new Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR, which won the FIA GT championship with a comfortable lead. The McLaren teams finished second and third in the standings in what became the F1’s final official season in GT racing. At the 1997 24 Hours of Le Mans, the GTR finished second and third, behind the seemingly unbeatable TWR Porsche WSC-95, but ahead of the 911 GT1 and several LMP cars. An impressive performance given the circumstances; one that McLaren takes great pride in given that the anniversary photo shoot was made with the Gulf-liveried, No. 41 "Longtail" that finished second at Le Mans in the hands of Jean-Marc Gounon, Pierre-Henri Raphanel and Anders Olofsson.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1995 McLaren F1 LM

1995 McLaren F1 LM

The quickest, most powerful, and most expensive F1 ever built

The McLaren F1 was launched in 1992 and revolutionized the supercar industry more than any other vehicle since the automobile was invented. It was not only the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis, but also the first to bring high-tech and expensive materials such as titanium, magnesium, Kevlar, and gold under the same roof. It also had an impressive drag coefficient of only 0.32, a smart interior made of lightweight materials, luggage compartments implemented in each rear fender, and a three-seat configuration with the driver placed in the middle, just like in a Formula One car.

Developed and built by Gordon Murray, arguably the best designed since Colin Chapman, the F1 also spawned a successful race car that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans at its first attempt, as well as a number of limited-edition models that went on to become some of the rarest and most expensive cars launched in 1990s. One of them is the F1 LM, a supercar McLaren built to celebrate its Le Mans victory in 1995. The LM was limited to only five example, the exact number of F1 GTRs that finished the race.

Arguably the quickest and most powerful road car at the time of its introduction, the LM went on to become the most expensive road-going McLaren and a highly sought-after collectible. Find out what makes it special in our full review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1 LM.

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McLaren F1 GTR Onboard At Laguna Seca: Video

McLaren F1 GTR Onboard At Laguna Seca: Video

Lanzante, the company that converted the track-only P1 GTR into the road-legal, but still extreme P1 LM, has announced plans to attempt a new Nurburgring lap record later this year. It wouldn’t be surprising for Lanzante to achieve its goal, but until McLaren has the opportunity to brag about a new record, we’ll just have a look at its previous record setting machine thanks to a video from the 2016 Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Laguna Seca.

The footage, which surfaced the Interwebz courtesy of YouTube’s "The Race Channel," shows a visor cam of Bill Auberlen driving a 1996 McLaren F1 GTR on one of America’s most legendary race tracks. The car in question is none other than the first-generation F1 GTR, which unlike the P1 GTR, saw some serious track action and won several races, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1995.

Essentially a slightly beefed-up version of the road car, the F1 GTR used the same 6.0-liter V-12 engine developed by BMW, and as you can see in the video, it gives the car an amazing exhaust note that only large-displacement, naturally aspirated powerplants can offer. Not just noisy, the F1 GTR is also incredibly fast, and laps the Laguna Seca while zooming past other race cars present at the classic car event.

Making the video that much more entertaining is the fact that Auberlen pushes the F1 GTR to the limit, racing it like it’s the mid-1990s and the race car just came from the factory. Hit play and enjoy!

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McLaren Boss Shoots Down Hyper GT Rumor

McLaren Boss Shoots Down Hyper GT Rumor

In this case, it looks like the past won’t repeat itself

Just last week we brought you news a rumor that McLaren was building a limited-edition model that wouldn’t be a successor to the iconic McLaren F1, but a modern interpretation of it. When the story went live on Autocar, the outlet released a number of renderings of what the car might look like. The rumor itself sounded quite promising and spawned a lot of public interest. That said, it should be no surprise that when the chance arose, journalists went straight to McLaren to get the scoop.

According to Car and Driver, McLaren Boss Mike Flewitt was asked all about it at the company’s recent financial results meeting. He offered up news on the rumor, but it was – unfortunately – not the news we were looking to hear. When asked about the Hyper GT, Flewitt’s reply was, “You get asked all the time. I regularly get asked for three seats and a V-12 and a manual gearbox. I just don’t think there’s a real business case to do one of those.” He continued, “I haven’t got six VIN numbers in my bottom drawer that we forgot to use, either. People often hark back to things that they’ve loved, but it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the right thing to do now.”

He did express a little bit of humor over Autocar’s renderings, however, apparently suggesting in a joking way that he would replace McLaren’s design team with Autocar’s artists. While that is great for a good laugh, it’s still quite the letdown that we won’t be seeing a three-seater McLaren any time soon. Of course, we can still hold onto hope but, when it comes to seeing a modern F1 by 2018, I wouldn’t suggest holding your breath.

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McLaren Is Reportedly Bringing Back This Iconic Model To Serve As Inspiration For Its Next Supercar

McLaren Is Reportedly Bringing Back This Iconic Model To Serve As Inspiration For Its Next Supercar

A new supercar is being planned in Woking with direct influences from the McLaren F1

The P1 may still be regarded as the crown jewel of McLaren’s current model lineup, but an all-new, limited-edition supercar could take its place alongside the P1 hypercar as there are reports that the British automaker is in the development stages of building a modern iteration of the brand’s iconic F1 supercar. The model, referred to within McLaren as the “Hyper GT,” will take plenty of styling cues from the F1, most notably the legendary supercar’s three-seat layout, dihedral doors, and the roof snorkel.

To be clear, the proposed model isn’t technically going to be a successor to the F1. It may be in spirit, but this model is being prepared as it’s own model, one that will put a premium on comfort and luxury, or like what a true GT should be. The car is also reportedly getting a bespoke version of McLaren’s carbon fiber monocage, the same component that was first developed for the P1.

McLaren’s goal, it seems, is to use this model as a showcase for McLaren Special Operations, the personalized arm of the company that’s become known in supercar circles for its outstanding iterations of the automaker’s current model lineup to go with special one-offs like the McLaren X1.

There’s no word on the exact output of the Hyper GT, although it is believed that it will eventually possess a tuned version of the automaker’s 3.8-liter twin-turbo V-8 engine with no electrical motors. That setup will be good for at least 700 horsepower, making it slightly more powerful than the McLaren 675LT. Top speed has been pegged at over 200 mph on account of having a better power-to-weight ratio than the McLaren 650S.

It’s not known if McLaren plans to name the Hyper GT in the vein of the F1, but given the influence of the iconic supercar on this model, don’t be surprised if the name doesn’t fall too far from the F1’s tree.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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1995 - 1997 McLaren F1 GTR

1995 - 1997 McLaren F1 GTR

In 1992, McLaren took the supercar market by surprise with a vehicle that was unlike any other produced until then: the F1. Not only lighter and more powerful than anything else in dealerships at the time, the F1 was also the first production car to feature a carbon-fiber monocoque and a center-mounted driver’s seat, among many other unique features and innovations. What’s more, it became the world’s fastest production car at 240.1 mph, smashing the previous record by a whopping 27.8 mph.

What the world didn’t know then was that the F1 would also spawn a successful race car.

Although McLaren had used many racing technologies and designs for the F1, Gordon Murray’s goal was to build "the ultimate road car." McLaren had no intention to take it racing, but many customers and racing teams started seeing the potential in the F1 as soon as the first cars had hit the roads. Ray Bellm and Thomas Bscher were among those who turned to Gordon Murray and Ron Dennis in an attempt to convince them to build racing versions for the BPR Global GT Series.

McLaren agreed to build F1s for the track if Bellm would bring him at least three customers for such a car. A few months later, the three customers and Dennis met to sign the contract and the F1 GTR project was born, which would give McLaren its first outright win at Le Mans.

Updated 07/06/2016: In order to celebrate 650S GT3’s win at the Nürburgring round of the Blancpain Sprint Series this weekend, McLaren took a look back into the history and released a very cool video featuring the McLaren F1 GTR at the Nürburgring in the fifth race of the 1996 BPR Global GT Series. And you guessed, the F1 GTR was also a winner. Hit "play" to watch the video!

Continue reading to find out more about the McLaren F1 GTR.

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McLaren Is Selling What Could Be The Best F1 Ever Built

McLaren Is Selling What Could Be The Best F1 Ever Built

Dreams can still come true for those longing for a McLaren F1

McLaren F1s with under 3,000 miles on their odometer are hard to come by these days. Actually, “impossible” might be a better word to describe it. But, if there’s anything the world has taught us, it’s to never lose hope on the impossible because you never know what you might stumble into. And just as I say that, a close-to-brand-new McLaren F1 is now up for sale and this one comes from the most reliable of sellers: McLaren’s Special Operations (MSO) division.

According to McLaren, the F1 in question wears chassis number 69 and is the 60th of the 64 F1 models to be hand-built in McLaren’s production facility in Woking, England. It’s also one of the last six F1s to be produced, so that in itself tells you the condition of this iconic supercar relative to its brethren. Even better, every detail about the car is about as good as it gets for the F1 given its age. It comes with a Carbon Black finish, perfectly underscoring the mythical aura it has established throughout the years. The 17-inch magnesium wheels also have a similar finish. Inside, the central driving seat - yep, it has the 1+2 seating configuration - is dressed in fine black leather with a striking red leather serving as a nice contrast. As for the dual passenger seats, I hardly think you can go wrong with those two getting upholstered in Alcantara.

Let’s not forget about the engine because that BMW-sourced, 6.1-liter, naturally aspirated, V-12 is one of the biggest reasons, maybe even the biggest, why the F1 has become such the definition of iconic brand. The V-12 was good enough to pump out 672 horsepower, a number that seems so normal today, but back in the mid 90’s, it was a much different story. Consider this too: the F1 had a top speed of 242 mph, a figure that would still qualify it as one of the fastest production cars today. It also still holds the title of being the fastest naturally aspirated production car. Think about that. No one in the last two decades has ever come close to toppling that record.

As you might expect, McLaren, which crafted a press release to announce the car’s sale, did not disclose the price of this F1. Anybody who is interested needs to inquire about the car directly to specialoperations@mclaren.com.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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McLaren F1 GTR 'Longtail' On-board With Kenny Bräck At Goodwood: Video

McLaren F1 GTR ’Longtail’ On-board With Kenny Bräck At Goodwood: Video

Being a McLaren driver comes with its share of perks and responsibilities. The latter is without question the more important part of the job since you’re tasked with driving McLaren cars to their absolute limit and report whatever findings you have back to the company. It’s a painstaking job that comes with its share of pressure-filled moments, so understandably, not everyone is qualified for the position. But, once a driver does land this gig, there are some perks that come with it.

1999 Indy 500 winner and X Games champion Kenny Brack, the newest member of McLaren’s test and development team, found that out in spectacular style when he was given a chance to drive a McLaren F1 GTR Longtail Prototype at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. This isn’t just an average drive around the Goodwood circuit. As the video shows, Brack was going full blast around the track, presumably trying to set a hot lap.

Check out the video and watch how Brack seems to be in a constant wrestling match with the F1 GTR Longtail Prototype’s steering wheel as he blasts through the Goodwood course. That goes to show how difficult it is to drive the iconic race car and the amount of concentration it takes to navigate around the Goodwood course without losing control of the car. It takes a special kind of driver to be able to put all those together and squeeze every ounce of performance out of the F1 GTR Longtail.

Brack appears to be up-to-the-task, which is probably why McLaren brought him in to be a part of its test and development team in the first place.

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Bill Auberlen Drives The McLaren F1 GTR: Video

Bill Auberlen Drives The McLaren F1 GTR: Video

2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the McLaren F1 GTR’s incredible victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. That incredible achievement was historic on multiple fronts, not the least of which is its distinction of being the last street-based GT car to win the world’s most prestigious endurance race. To commemorate the McLaren’s milestone victory, BMW Driver Bill Auberlen took the F1 GTR #017, for a commemorative lap around the Mid Ohio Sports Car Course.

It’s worth noting that the F1 GTR isn’t the actual car that took home the checkered flag at the 1995 24 Hours of Le Mans. This one placed eight at the 1996 edition of the race. The little switch-a-roo notwithstanding, that achievement is still held in high regard within the racing community, largely it ushered in an era of dominance for McLaren. In addition to winning the 1995 race, the F1 GTR also finished 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 13th overall. The year after that, the F1 GTR placed 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, and 11th in the race, followed by 2nd and 3rd place finishes in 1997.

You’re probably wondering at this point how exactly BMW is involved in this? Well, back then, McLaren didn’t have its own engine to call on so it sourced the V-12 engines it used in the F1 GTR from BMW. As such, the Bavarian manufacturer won as an engine supplier in 1995, four years before it won its first and only Le Mans title with the LMR V12 prototype.

Auberlen’s lap around the McLaren F1 GTR is impressive in a lot of fronts, none more so than the rippling sound of that BMW V-12 engine that’s as crisp as ever. If you didn’t know any better, you’d think that the engine was actually brand new.

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1997 McLaren F1 GT

1997 McLaren F1 GT

Built in 106 examples between 1992 and 1998, the McLaren F1 is now arguably the most valuable production car sold in the 1990s, with many units changing owners for millions of dollars.

There are many reasons for that.

First, it was by far the most innovative supercar of its era. It was lighter and more powerful than anything else in dealerships at the time, it was the first production car to feature a carbon-fiber monocoque and a center-mounted driver’s seat. Second, it was the world’s fastest production car for no fewer than 12 consecutive years, at 240.1 mph. Bugatti had to build a quad-turbo monster with more than 1,000 horsepower to defeat it. Third, the F1 spawned numerous road-legal and racing versions, with most of them considered a lot more valuable than the standard car.

One such model is the F1 GT, of which McLaren built only three examples in 1997, only half the production output of the 1995 McLaren F1 LM. The GT was actually the final incarnation of the road-going F1, developed as a homologation special for the race-spec 1995 - 1997 McLaren F1 GTR used throughout the 1997 FIA GT Championship, among other racing events. The GT is the rarest F1 ever built. Keep reading to find out what makes this supercar special.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1 GT.

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1998 McLaren F1 LM Specification

1998 McLaren F1 LM Specification

Any McLaren F1 is a unicorn, but the ultra-rare F1 LM-Specification cars are unicorns among unicorns. How rare? Only two were ever built. On average, ‘standard’ F1s routinely clear $10 million at auction, which is nothing to sneeze at, but the two LM-Specification cars could each be worth north of $15 million. In other words, you don’t have enough kidneys.

You’re probably familiar with the ultra-rare 1995 McLaren F1 LMs — five F1s built at the factory (plus one XP1 prototype) with upgraded engines, stripped-out interiors and McLaren’s Extra High Downforce Package. The ‘LM-Specifications’ are a bit different. Both chassis numbers 018 and 073 started life as a road-specification F1s and were later fitted with the more-powerful V-12 and high downforce aero package from the LM at the McLaren factory, but unlike the purebred LMs they retain the road car’s more-livable interior.

Chassis 073 never actually left the factory in its original specification. Originally built in 1998, its owner specified AMG Green Velvet paint with a two-tone tan and green interior, but instead of taking delivery of the car, the owner asked that it be kept at McLaren’s factory in Woking to be fitted with new LM bodywork, unique multi-spoke 18-inch wheels and upgraded engine. It was also painted in the brilliant orange metallic color pictured above.

Less is known about the origins of 018, but this metallic-silver example was originally built in 1994 and is fitted with the same five-spoke wheels as the LM. It currently lives in Auckland, New Zealand.

Updated 08/14/2015: This very rare McLaren F1 LM was sold at an auction in Monterey for a staggering $13.75 million, representing a new record for the car. This special F1 LM is part of the Pinnacle Portfolio collection, which will be sold off during the weekend in Monterey.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Le Mans Memories: Part 7 - Returning to Le Mans: Video

Le Mans Memories: Part 7 - Returning to Le Mans: Video

One of the coolest things at the 2015 24 Hours of Le Mans happened before the race even started. The five 1995-1996 McLaren F1 GTRs that dominated the 1995 race 20 years ago were led out on a parade of Le Sarthe by the new 2016 McLaren P1 GTR track-only hypercar. Also in tow were the Gulf-liveried 1997 McLaren F1 GTR Longtail and 28 McLaren owners who brought their cars out to the race. The entire event is covered in this recent video from McLaren, which is also the latest in its Le Mans Memories series.

The procession was asked to keep it under 50 mph, but it’s not every day you get to drive a McLaren on the Mulsanne Straight, so things got a little crazy. No one was willing to self-incriminate by divulging how fast they went, but McLaren test driver Chris Goodwin in the P1 GTR and J.J. Lehto in the Longtail were winding it out in at least fourth gear, which probably means they were approaching 150 mph.

Among the McLaren customers who made it out was a Canadian gentleman who had just flown a few days prior to pick up his lust-worthy new 2015 McLaren 650S LM from McLaren Paris — a special-edition 650S inspired by the No.59 car that won in 1995 — and drove it straight to Le Mans for the race. The owner of the “Superman” P1 we covered in May also made it out.

Be sure to watch the previous six episodes of Le Mans Memories as well, in which designer Gordon Murray, McLaren CEO Ron Dennis and team manager Paul Lanzante, among others, discuss the 1995 race. They’re all essential viewing for students of sports car racing history.

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Rowan Atkinson Sells His McLaren F1 For Around $12 Million

Rowan Atkinson Sells His McLaren F1 For Around $12 Million

Back in early February 2015 it was revealed that Rowan Atkinson decided to part with his rare McLaren F1 for £8 million, or about $12.3 million. Four months later and the supercar has found a new home. The F1 was sold to an unnamed British buyer through specialist car dealer Taylor & Crawler. The agency led by former McLaren sales and marketing director David Clark would not reveal the price paid by the new owner, but it is unlikely to be too far short of the asking price given the F1 is regarded as the most collectable vehicle of the past three decades.

The current official record for a McLaren F1 sale stands at $10.5 million and it was set in 2014 by an example previously owned by former IndyCar champion Michael Andretti. Though the sum of this new transaction remains undisclosed, it’s very likely Atkinson’s former supercar is the most expensive F1 ever sold. Also, it would rank among the highest prices ever paid in the U.K. for an automobile.

The Mr. Bean star bought his F1 in 1997 for around £540,000 (about $830,700) and drove it for 41,000 miles.

Atkinson’s F1 is also famous for triggering Britain’s biggest ever insurance claim. In 2011, after crashing the car into a hedge, Atkinson’s insurance company was handed a £910,000 (around $1.4 million) repair bill.

I have a feeling the new owner will be a lot more careful with his $12-million ride.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Le Mans Memories: Part 5 - The Father of the F1: Video

Le Mans Memories: Part 5 - The Father of the F1: Video

As we close in on the start of this year’s 24 Hours Of Le Mans, it’s always fun to take a look back at some of the legends in the history of this amazing race. This video, which is part of a series, looks at the McLaren F1. That would be a good thing to do no matter what, but this particular video is narrated by none other than Gordon Murray, the man who designed the F1. He tells a bit about his own background in Formula 1 racing (with McLaren, obviously), and how he came to be the one to head up this project.

He talks about how much the F1 had in common with race cars, something which might seem obvious in hindsight, but which was pretty groundbreaking at the time. The F1 would indeed end up being the fastest production car in the world, and for a long stretch of time. The car was such a beast that it needed to be detuned in order to compete at Le Mans, but that didn’t keep it from winning 1995, something which Murray says was the biggest achievement of his life. Easy to see why.
Continue reading for more.

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Le Mans Memories: Part 4 - The View From The Pit Wall: Video

Le Mans Memories: Part 4 - The View From The Pit Wall: Video

The 24 Hours of Le Mans is shaping up to be a pretty special event. Not just because we’re expecting an epic clash between Audi, Porsche, Toyota and newcomers Nissan for the overall win (which should be quite a thing to watch), but also because it’s the 20th anniversary of McLaren’s overall win. To commemorate, McLaren is trotting out all five F1 GTRs that participated in the 1995 race and has released this special series of videos documenting the race.

The McLaren F1 was never intended to go racing, but there was enough interest from racing teams to justify building a race version. It was the first and only time a manufacturer won Le Mans on its first try, but the overall sense you get from these videos was how hastily put together and haphazard the entire program was — very un-McLaren-like.

“I thought we’d only do about an hour.” Paul Lanzante was team manager for the winning No. 59 Ueno Clinic car and describes his mindset going into the race: “I’ve never had a car on a grid of a race where it was, not to say the most disorganized or the most badly prepared, but there was still so much more to do, which we never had time for. So much more understanding. And before you know it, we’re pushing the car on the grid and they’re putting the flag over it, and I thought, ‘This is it. We’ve done all we can.’”

Obviously, it was enough.

If you’re a student of endurance racing history, these four videos are well worth your time. They also also plenty of period footage from the race itself, complete with the sounds of shrieking 6.1-liter V-12s.

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McLaren F1 GTR Sponsored By Top Gear For Sale

McLaren F1 GTR Sponsored By Top Gear For Sale

If you read my "Six Reasons Why the McLaren F1 Is Still the World’s Coolest Supercar" piece from earlier this month, you probably already know that my arguments include the fact that F1s have become quite expensive recently. Whether they’re sold at public auctions or traded privately, buyers need to pay at least a couple of million bucks to take one home. A standard, road-going F1 in mint condition may fetch close to $10 million easily nowadays, but race-spec GTRs can be much more expensive. Exactly how expensive is something we will find out later this summer, when the Gulf-liveried F1 GTR Longtail shown above will change owners during a private sale supervised by McLaren itself.

Developed for the newly-formed FIA GT Championship in 1997, the Long Tail was the third and final iteration of the F1 GTR. Created to tackle the likes of the Porsche 911 GT1 and the Mercedes-Benz CLK-GTR, the F1 GTR Long Tail featured a much longer nose and tail, as well as a wider rear wing. In short, the Long Tail was designed for the best possible aerodynamic downforce. McLaren built only 10 Long Tail race cars and three road-legal homologation versions.

This specific car, sponsored by Gulf, Dunhill, and Top Gear Magazine among others, had a rather disappointing career in the FIA GT Championship, scoring points only twice during the 1997 season. It changed owners many times following its retirement, fetching around $13 million at a Bonham’s auction in 2012.

Continue reading for the full story.

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McLaren to Celebrate Le Mans Win with F1 GTR Parade at Circuit de la Sarthe

McLaren to Celebrate Le Mans Win with F1 GTR Parade at Circuit de la Sarthe

McLaren Automotive and McLaren Special Operations (MSO) have announced plans to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the F1 GTR’s famous 24 Hours of Le Mans win next month with a special display at the Circuit de la Sarthe. The five examples of the F1 GTR that dominated the 1995 race, including the winning No. 59 car, will return for a parade lap at Le Mans prior to the lights going green for the 83rd running of the world’s greatest endurance event.

Leading the five Le Mans cars on the 8.5-mile victory lap will be the F1 GTR’s spiritual successor, the 986-horsepower P1 GTR. The hybrid supercar will thus make its global dynamic debut on the Circuit de la Sarthe, a privilege very few vehicles can brag about.

The track-exclusive P1 will be driven by former racer Yannick Dalmas, who was part of the winning team in the Ueno Clinic-sponsored car, together with J.J. Lehto and Masanori Sekiya. Lehto and Sekiya will also join the parade, along with owners of the limited-edition 650S Le Mans, which McLaren also launched to celebrate the F1 GTR’s famous win.

On June 18th, 20 years ago, the McLaren GTR won the 24 Hours of Le Mans on its maiden outing at the Circuit de la Sarthe. The No. 59 car took the checkered flag one lap ahead of a Porsche-powered Courage C34. The next three cars to cross the finish line were also F1 GTRs. A fifth GTR took 13th place overall to give McLaren its most convincing performance at Le Mans.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Six Reasons Why the McLaren F1 Is Still the World's Coolest Supercar

Six Reasons Why the McLaren F1 Is Still the World’s Coolest Supercar

It’s been nearly five decades since the Lamborghini Miura started the mid-engined supercar craze, and this exclusive automotive niche has evolved beyond the wildest dreams. All motors have been replaced by turbocharged engines, standard transmissions gave way to Formula One-based units, and aerodynamics reached a point where very few improvements can still be made.

More recently, carmakers turned to electrification to improve performance and reduce fuel consumption and emissions. Technology continues to set new standards with each year, while luxury features have become mandatory for success. In all, there’s a huge gap between the 1966 Lamborghini Miura and the 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari, one that was hard to predict a few decades ago.

My goal here is not to list everything that changed, but, just to make a point, it’s important to stress that top speed alone has increased dramatically. While supercars barely made it past 170 mph in the late 1960s, blasting past 200 mph has become the norm today. Some supercars, such as the Bugatti Veyron, have set world records beyond 240 mph.

But how important are these numbers beyond statistics? It really depends on what tickles your fancy. To some, the Bugatti Veyron is the ultimate supercar due to its incredible top speed, luxurious interior and the endless customization options offered for it. Others turn to the LaFerrari to get their supercar fix, simply because all that speed comes with a spaceship-like design and a Prancing Horse on the nose.

I, on the other hand, like my supercars old-fashioned. And by that I mean I need them to be more that just a statement of speed and luxury. Originally, supercars were meant to fulfill the dream of being able to drive a race car on the street. Or, better said, to be able to drive it to the track, change a few settings, and fight for glory.

In an era when only enthusiasts such as Jim Glickenhaus build supercars that can do just that, it’s safe to say those days are long gone. However, some supercars from the past are still here to entertain gearheads like me. The McLaren F1 is one of them, the kind of supercar I would prefer to any modern hypercar.

Why? Glad you asked! Keep reading to find out what makes the McLaren F1 the world’s coolest supercar more than two decades since its official introduction.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1.

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McLaren F1 - Mini Documentary: Video

McLaren F1 - Mini Documentary: Video

There are a few different reasons why McLaren F1s have been selling for north of $10 million recently. Two are obvious: They’re fantastic to drive and only 106 examples were ever built, but the third reason is in the F1’s extraordinary details, which is what this video from EVO Magazine is all about. Fresh off a comparison with its much newer hybrid-hypercar cousin, the P1, EVO decided to take an further look at the F1.

As a McLaren F1 obsessive, I’ve been poring over its details since I first read about it in 1992, but I still learned a few new things in this video. Designer Peter Stevens used onomatopoeia to describe to BMW engineers how he wanted the engine to sound when it started. The horn and headlight switches operate similar to paddle shifters on modern cars. Its exhaust cost more to develop than the cost of the BMW V12. It didn’t come with a radio—just a CD player because Gordon Murray didn’t like radio (he’s still a huge Travelling Wilburys fan). I could go on and on, but you should really just watch for yourself.

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EVO Pits The McLaren P1 Against The McLaren F1: Video

EVO Pits The McLaren P1 Against The McLaren F1: Video

It’s likely that there are few better times to be had than spending your birthday while driving a McLaren P1 and a McLaren F1 back-to-back in the south of France. This is how EVO’s Henry Catchpole spent his birthday, and the resulting comparison between the two titans is nothing short of amazing. EVO actually spent months orchestrating a get-together between the two McLarens and at one point it looked like it was never going to happen.

Fortunately, a very lucky owner of both a 1995 McLaren F1 and a 2015 McLaren P1 stepped in and kindly offered his two prized possessions for a test drive in France, on a winding road not far from the Paul Ricard Circuit. Catchpole obviously jumped at the opportunity, and the resulting video is breathtaking. To make everything even more interesting, both models sport "chassis number 046" plates and both are painted in the McLaren-only Genesis Blue Metallic.

Despite the 20-odd years separating the two supercars, the F1 still features a higher top speed than the P1, and kept the "world’s fastest production car" title for over eight years, until it was finally snatched by the Bugatti Veyron. I couldn’t help but feel jealousy toward the owner’s taste in both exotics, car colors and even license plates, as you can see that all are related between the two models. In the end, it seems that despite the obvious progress in terms of cornering speeds, acceleration and drivability achieved by the P1, it is the mighty F1 that remains the overall winner, mostly thanks to its more analog approach to performance.

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"Le Mans Memories:" Part 1 - The Birth of the McLaren F1 GTR: Video

"Le Mans Memories:" Part 1 - The Birth of the McLaren F1 GTR: Video

With 2015 underway, McLaren Automotive is getting ready to celebrate the 20th anniversary of its first and only 24 Hours of Le Mans win. Motorsports enthusiasts might recall that McLaren’s sole success on the Circuit de la Sarthe occurred in 1995, when the dark-gray-liveried F1 GTR of Kokusai Kaihatsu Racing took the checkered flag one lap ahead of the Courage C34 driven by then-55-year-old Mario Andretti. Three more GTRs completed the top five for one of McLaren’s greatest racing campaigns. 20 years later, the Brits recall the birth of the F1 GTR with Ray Bellm, the very man who convinced Ron Dennis to build an F1-based race car.

Bellm, a racing driver himself, began his career in 1980, running in historic racing series before moving to modern sports car racing in the mid-1980s. Although he has never reached the fame of iconic British racers such as Sir Stirling Moss or Jackie Stewart, he went on to win the World Sportscar C2 Championship in 1985, 1986, and 1988; the International GT championship in 1994, and the BPR Global GT Series in 1996, driving a McLaren F1 GTR to 11 victories in two years. He was also part of the F1 GTR-powered GTC Gulf Racing team that finished fourth at Le Mans in 1995, making him one of the very few drivers suited to talk about McLaren’s greatest Le Mans car.

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Rowan Atkinson's McLaren F1 can be Yours for $12M

Rowan Atkinson’s McLaren F1 can be Yours for $12M

Rowan Atkinson is quite the interesting fellow. A mainly comedic actor who made his name playing characters like Black Adder and Mr. Bean, the genial man has spent much of his spare time and wealth indulging in his real passion of cars. While he has owned dozens of machines over the years from exotic names like Ferrari and Aston Martin, one of his most prized automotive possessions is his McLaren F1. It has been one of his main daily drivers over the years and he has amassed a relatively astronomical 40,000 miles on the clock.

During that time, it has seen countless motorway journeys, many school runs and even a few days at the track. It has also seen the wrong end of an insurance adjuster twice. The first time Atkinson merely wrinkled it a bit, but his second crash nearly tore the car completely in half. Now after 17 years of ownership, — the longest tenure of any car he has owned — Mr. Bean has decided it is time to sell his beloved supercar.

If you are unfamiliar with the F1, you must be on the wrong Website for starters, but allow me to freshen your memory. This was an ultralight, ultrafast carbon-fiber supercar created by McLaren and it redefined the automobile. Powered by a BMW-sourced, V-12 engine that produced 627 horsepower, the F1 was capable of reaching 240 mph, making it the fastest production car in the world. A title it held for more than a decade until the Bugatti Veyron arrived. The car had many technical quirks over others on the market like its three-person seating with the driver mounted center, and the passengers slightly rearward and to each side. It also had an engine bay lined with gold foil, because gold is the best conductor of heat.

Sadly, Rowan Atkinson has finally decided it is time to part with his machine, so in just a few weeks’ time, this incredible supercar — one of only 107 ever built — will have a new owner. That said, if you were hoping the high mileage and multiple collisions would make this thing a bargain, you better think again. As it stands, the car is being offered for no less than $12 million.

Click past the jump to read more about the Rowan Atkinson’s McLaren F1.

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McLaren F1 Driven on Narrow European Roads: Video

McLaren F1 Driven on Narrow European Roads: Video

The P1 may be McLaren’s fastest and most advanced supercar to date, but the hybrid marvel has yet to reach the iconic status of the F1, the company’s first-ever production car. Sure, the P1 is more powerful and a lot quicker than its ancestor, but the F1 is nothing to sneeze at for a supercar that was designed in the early 1990s. Its BMW-sourced mill delivered 627 horsepower and it needed just 3.2 seconds to charge from 0 to 60 mph. More importantly, it came with a top speed of 240 mph, a figure not even the P1 or the Ferrari LaFerrari can reach more than two decades later.

You can say what you like about the F1, but it’s still one of the fastest supercars ever built. And unlike other modern-day supercars, it managed to prove itself on the track by winning the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in 1995. How many Bugatti Veyrons, Koenigsegg CCXs or LaFerraris have you seen take part in an endurance race? Don’t bother Googling it, the answer is none! Rather than do what Bugatti did and develop a vehicle that’s just fast in a straight line and awfully expensive, McLaren used its extensive motorsport know-how to build a race car that could shatter records outside the track. If that’s not amazing, I don’t know what is.

Anyways, the main reason I’ve been blabbering about the McLaren F1 for the past two paragraphs is because we just stumbled across a new video showing Britain’s prized supercar being driven somewhere in Europe. The interesting thing about this 10-minute video is that it’s about more than just engine noise and high-speed hooning. Don’t worry, there’s plenty of hammer dropping, but the footage also shows that the F1 can be driven on narrow British roads, over speed bumps and under normal traffic conditions. It’s something you don’t get to see everyday, and although the video is a bit shaky, it deserves 10 minutes of your time.

Click past the jump to read more about the McLaren F1.

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Video: One of Three McLaren F1 HDKs Spotted in California

Video: One of Three McLaren F1 HDKs Spotted in California

If you’re still drooling over the astonishing McLaren P1, it’s time you take a break and have a look at the company’s rarest road-legal supercar to date. Don’t let the first seconds of the video above fool you, what you’re looking at is no regular McLaren F1. What you see in Shmee150’s latest supercar-spotting adventure is the F1 HDK, of which only three examples were built. If it doesn’t ring a bell, HDK stands for High Downforce Kit, a package that basically transferred some of the aerodynamic features seen on the F1 race car on the road-legal machine.

Optimized for better handling at the track, the F1 HDK stands out in a pack of regular F1s thanks to its carbon-fiber splitter, flared wheel arches and fixed rear wing. The example spotted at this year’s Car Week in Monterey, California, is also equipped with matte-black wheels, but that’s not exactly standard for the HDK. You see, all three units are actually one-off vehicles tailored to their owners desires, which is what makes then that much more spectacular and expensive at the same time. These cars are known to worth more than $10 million each, a figure that speaks volumes of the HDK’s importance to the supercar world.

Although the F1 HDK is as rare as it gets, this owner is not shy about using his white example on a daily basis. He even used it to travel for hundreds of miles to get to Car Week, and the slightly dirty bodywork is there to prove just that. I’ve even spotted a couple of dents and although I wouldn’t want to see a single scratch on my F1 — if I had one, of course — I think it’s really cool this HDK is not a trailer queen. Hats off to the owner, whoever he may be!

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One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 "Project 8" Crashes During a Parade with Rowan Atkinson

One-of-a-Kind McLaren F1 "Project 8" Crashes During a Parade with Rowan Atkinson

Rowan Atkinson’s name is tied to yet another car crash with a McLaren F1. This time, though, he wasn’t the one who crashed the supercar, but was actually one of the first to help the guy who did. Atkinson was driving his F1 in a convoy of fellow F1 owners driving along Tuscany when a man identified as a rich American businessman lost control of his F1 and crashed it into a tree before flipping over.

Knowing a thing or two about crashing the F1, Mr. Bean sprung into action, helping out the injured driver as medical personnel headed to the scene. Bystanders spotted the British actor picking up pieces of wreckage from the McLaren, all while presumably having flashbacks to his own crash three years ago.

Fortunately, the driver didn’t sustain any serious injuries and is reportedly in good condition after being airlifted to a hospital in Pisa. The same, though, can’t be said for the F1, which looks like a mangled heap that’ll probably give insurance companies nightmares for a long time. Hopefully the rig survives to live another day, as McLaren built only 64 road-ready F1 units.

For the record, this F1 is chassis No. 72. This particular red-and-white paint scheme is actually part of a pair of bespoke McLarens, as there is a matching McLaren 12C out there too. McLaren dubbed this matching pair "Project 8."

Click past the jump to read more about McLaren F1

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Andretti-Owned McLaren F1 Sold For $10 Million

Andretti-Owned McLaren F1 Sold For $10 Million

With only 64 standard street versions built, the McLaren F1 is one of the rarest supercars around. And since the company stopped building them about 16 years ago, those looking to add an F1 to their garage need to search for months, if not years, to find one for sale and spend millions of dollars to take it home.

One of these jewels changed owners for no less than $5.5 million a couple of years ago, a record for the astounding F1. However, a more recent sale saw one of these supercars fetch nearly double the amount, with a British F1 nut paying £6.2 million or $10.5 million at current exchange rates.

The amount is more than staggering, but there are a couple of reasons for why the anonymous Brit paid the price of nearly ten P1s to get a 20-year-old car. First of all, the model depicted in the photo above is one of the only two F1s finished in red. Secondly, this example, bearing chassis No. 28, was initially delivered to Michael Andretti, former IndyCar champion, owner of Andretti Autosport and son of renowned Formula One and Le Mans ace Mario Andretti.

The former racing driver reportedly owned the F1 for about two years before selling it to a Japanese collector. The vehicle eventually returned to the U.S. and spent ten years in California prior to being sold to its new British owner. According to Western Morning News, the firm commissioned to find an F1 for the British enthusiast spent no less than six months trying to source one.

Click past the jump to read more about the McLaren F1.

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Video: McLaren F1 and Ferrari F40 Takes on its Analogue Rivals

Video: McLaren F1 and Ferrari F40 Takes on its Analogue Rivals

British magazine, EVO, did one of the most amazing test drives we have seen in the past few months: it put two of the greatest supercars of yesteryear, the McLaren F1 and the Ferrari F40, against their biggest rivals in an attempt to see which one is the best.

The result is a 17-minute video that brings together models like Porsche Carrera GT, Noble M600, Pagani Zonda F and Lamborghini Murcielago LP670-4 SV. We don’t know about you, but we don’t really care what model was the best, we just want to enjoy this great show.

This video also serves as proof of just how much skill it took to pilot the older supercars. You needed to practically be a professionally trained F1 driver to handle them. Be sure you will turn up the volume as for sure there are lots of great sounds you will want to enjoy!

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Video: Jay Leno Gives us a Tour of the McLaren F1 Engine

Video: Jay Leno Gives us a Tour of the McLaren F1 Engine

Even after years of being around, the McLaren F1 still deserves the respect of being one of the first modern-day supercars to grace us with its presence.

Everything about the F1 inspires conversation, but this time around, we leave noted auto enthusiast Jay Leno to give us the lowdown on one of the F1’s most important features: its engine.

Professor Leno has his own F1 and it needed a new fuel pump, which made it pretty easy to access its 6.0-liter V-12 engine because, believe it or not, you have to yank out this powerplant to access the pump. In so doing, Leno gives us the lowdown on what makes this particular engine well suited to satisfy the rage of the McLaren supercar and allow it produce all of its 618 horsepower.

Considering that the F1 first made headway 20 years ago, you can make a definite case that the 618 horsepower it produces without any turbochargers is still a benchmark few other vehicles can be proud to say they’ve met these days.

That’s saying a lot, adding only to the mystique of the F1 and its capabilities as a track-capable supercar capable of hitting 62 mph in just over 3 seconds, while hitting a top speed of just a shade under 250 mph - back in 1998.

And to Jay Leno’s credit, his willingness to show us the inner guts of the McLaren F1’s engine is something that’s well appreciated.

Click past the jump to read about the McLaren F1

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2013 McLaren XP1 LM

2013 McLaren XP1 LM

McLaren’s biggest surprise for the 2013 Geneva Motor Show is no doubt the new P1, but it looks like we will have the chance to admire a second supercar at the company’s stand in Switzerland. Before you get too excited, you have to know that we are not going to see a new model. Instead, McLaren is going to display one of the coolest models it has ever developed: the XP1 LM - a one-off edition to pay tribute to the F1 LM.

The XP1 LM is painted in the brand’s signature Papaya orange and is promised by McLaren CEO, Ron Dennis, to his driver Lewis Hamilton if he should win two Formula One World Championship titles. The model keeps the same 680-horsepower 6.1-liter V-12 engine found in the F1 LM.

The 2013 Geneva Motor Show represents the first time the McLaren F1 XP1 LM has been shown outside of the UK. We’ll update this review when McLaren releases more information.

Click past the jump to read McLaren’s press release

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Repairs for Rowan Atkinson’s McLaren F1 Eclipses $1 Million

There are a handful of cars that cost over $1 million. However, for repairs for a car to hit seven figures, well, that’s unheard of…

Not anymore, apparently.

Rowan Atkinson’s McLaren F1, which was destroyed during an accident that occurred back in August 2011, is now up and running again. Now, repairing a totally mangled supercar of the stature of the McLaren F1 takes a pretty long time, as McLaren engineers will attest after spending more than a year restoring the car to run again. With that much time spent on just putting the car back together, costs for the repair eventually ran up to the tune of £910,000 ($1.44 million).

That figure is even more remarkable considering that it’s three times as expensive as any other repair claim that has been documented in the UK. Just a hunch: Mr. Atkinson’s insurance company will no doubt raise his insurance rates after this deal – whether they paid for it or not.

Granted, it’s a McLaren F1. But still, $1 million for repairing a car is just absurd.

Note: Photo above is not Rowan Atkinson’s restored McLaren F1

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Video: First DLC Pack for Forza: Horizon Comes with McLaren F1 and a Host of Other Exotics

Video: First DLC Pack for Forza: Horizon Comes with McLaren F1 and a Host of Other Exotics

Just in time for the holiday season, Turn 10 Studios is dropping the first ever expansion pack for Forza: Horizon. Judging by the list of seven new vehicles that are part of the December IGN Car Pack, you’d be a fool to let this pack go by without snagging it up.

The pack includes: the McLaren F1, the 2012 Ferrari F12berlinetta, the 2012 Aston Martin DBS, a Ford F-150 SCT Raptor, the Hummer H1 Alpha Open Top, and most intriguingly, the 2006 Ford GTX1.

That’s the kind of list usually reserved only for fantasy garages. Now, for less money than a new pair of Air Jordans, you can own all of those exotics and have them at your complete disposable. Of course, you can only drive in the virtual world of Forza: Horizon. But, hey, that’s where the fantasy kicks in.

The December IGN Pack for Forza: Horizon will go live on December 4. Be on the lookout for it. In the meantime, check out this trailer of the pack from Turn 10 Studios. If that doesn’t get you excited, we don’t know why you even have an XBox 360 to begin with.

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McLaren F1 Sells For Over $5 Million in Britain

We all know that the McLaren F1 is one of the rarest (only 64 road-going models built) and fastest cars to date and they regularly – as regularly as an F1 can be sold – go for well over $3 million. Well, over in Britain, car buyers are obviously a little more free with their money, as a buyer not only crushed the average buying price, but also beat the standing record for highest buying price on a McLaren F1 set at £2,530,000 ($4.27 million at October 2008’s average conversion rate) in 2008 by RM Auctions.

Tony Hartley Jr. is one of the few 29-year-old men on the planet lucky enough to not only have driven an F1, but also lucky enough to own one. Actually, we should say he was lucky enough to own one, as he recently sold it across the pond for an incredible £3.5 million ($5.59 million at current exchange rates). That’s one heck of a price to pay for a 15- to 20-year-old car with likely less than 1,000 miles on the ticker and cobwebs in its cylinders.

Then again, when you figure it featured a 627-horsepower, V-12 engine that made mincemeat out of Ferraris and Lamborghinis all day, and screamed to 60 mph in just 3.2 seconds, it is actually a pretty decent investment. Believe it or not, the F1 still does hold one impressive world record and that is being the world’s fastest naturally aspirated car.

Regardless of records and rarity, that’s one expensive ride…

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1997 Gulf McLaren F1 GTR Longtail

1997 Gulf McLaren F1 GTR Longtail

It’s a car that will more than likely just take up some space in someone’s garage, but it could still fetch millions at an auction the same way one of its contemporaries did just over a year ago.

The piece of automotive racing history that we’re talking about is the Gulf Team Davidoff McLaren F1 GTR Longtail, and should you have millions of dollars in your piggy bank, you’ll be happy to know that the car is headed to the upcoming Pebble Beach Auction in August 2012 in Carmel Valley, California.

Judging by the level of interest surrounding this car, the sky is really the limit on how much it’s going to go for at the auction. Combine that with the fact that a similar make and model was sold last year for $3.9 million, and you have a rare racing car that’s going to sell for a lot of zeroes.

This particular F1 GTR Longtail also happens to have an interesting history behind it. It was originally built as chassis number 027R, but ultimately ended up as a spare car - chassis 028R - after sustaining damage during one of its transports. In the end, the car wound racing in a number of racing events, highlighted by its participation during the 1997 FIA GT season.

Should you be interested in owning a true hard-to-find racer, you better break open that piggy bank because you’re going to have to pay a fortune for the chance to show off the car to your buddies.

Find out more about the 1997 Gulf McLaren F1 GTR ’028R’ Longtail after the jump.

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McLaren F1 designer Gordon Murray unveils 'The Batmobile'

McLaren F1 designer Gordon Murray unveils ’The Batmobile’

Gordon Murray is an iconic designer in the auto industry because of his previous work with the equally legendary McLaren F1. As a man that has long built a reputation as one of the best designers in the industry, Murray’s latest project involves the design of a car that’s arguably more famous than even the McLaren F1: the Batmobile.

Featuring aerodynamics that were inspired by Formula One, the two-seater Batmobile was designed and built for a different purpose than what we’d hope. No, we’re not going to see this car patrol our cities from criminals, nor are we going to see it on the silver screen anytime soon. Instead, this particular Batmobile will grace the stage in the Broadway musical, BATMAN Live.

In addition to the F1-sourced aerodynamic built, this Batmobile also comes with an eco-friendly hydrogen fuel cell powertrain and, in true Caped Crusader fashion, it also has plenty of gadgets and gizmos that would make Adam West proud. Murray made all the sketches and design details of the car, but was not responsible for the actual build of the Batmobile. That task was left to a London-based independent fabrication shop.

While we were surprised to find out Gordon Murray’s involvement in such a project, we’d be the last people to ever question the master’s work, especially if it involves the Dark Knight’s ride.

UPDATE 07/25/11: We don’t know if this is a foreboding of things to come, but Gordon Murray’s assault-on-the-senses, eco-friendly Batmobile crashed before the opening of the Batman Live World Arena Tour in the UK last week. No word on how the whole accident happened, but it’s definitely not the kind of start the organizers of the five-year traveling event wanted to have. Fortunately, a replacement car was immediately flown in and arrived just before the event kicks off tomorrow.

Check out the Batmobile’s official unveiling in London after the jump.

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Battle of the McLarens: F1 GTR takes on the MP4-12C

Battle of the McLarens: F1 GTR takes on the MP4-12C

The new McLaren MP4-12C is quite a slice of heaven if you’re into supercars. Only a handful of other supercars can stake claim to being as capable – if not more – than the MP4-12C so judging by that factor alone, there’s a piece of this McLaren machine that every gear head in the right frame of mind would want to have a piece of.

But seeing as McLaren is a brand that doesn’t produce new models every year, the bigger and far more intriguing question is how their new bad boy stacks up against its bigger brother, the F1. Or in this particular case, how it can hold up against the racecar version of its predecessor, the F1 GTR. Steve Sutcliffe of Autocar went to the only place where you can pit the two rockets on wheels head-to-head with one another: the race track.

On sheer stats alone, the F1-GTR already has the leg-up over the MP4-12C not because both have an output of somewhere in the neighborhood of 600 horsepower, but because the former, as a pure and unadulterated race car, is about 1,000 lbs lighter than the latter.

At the end of the test, it was pretty evident that despite all the new technologies that come with the MP4-12C, it’s heavier frame still played a pivotal role in the competition – albeit barely – failing to edge the F1 GTR in a good ol’ fashioned sprint to the finish line.

Nevertheless, the MP4-12C is still one of those rare supercars that any man would be lucky to own, regardless of how it stacks up against a race version of its older brother.

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$4 million for the last remaining McLaren F1 GTR

$4 million for the last remaining McLaren F1 GTR

There’s something to be said about owning a car that only a select few in the world have too. Call it bragging rights or what-have-you, but having a rare piece of gem like a McLaren F1 GTR tucked in your garage automatically gives you cool points for life.

That’s why if you have around $4 million, we suggest that you take the money, don’t tell the wife, and spend it on one of the most exclusive cars on the planet. This particular model is the last McLaren F1 GTR ever produced, making it quite a historic car on top of its exclusivity. It’s got some racing pedigree, too, having been raced in a number of series from 1995 to 1997, including the maiden season of the FIA GT Championship.

In terms of what you’re getting for what’s under it’s hood, this particular F1 GTR has a destroked 6.0-liter version of the F1’s V12 engine, capable of producing 600 horsepower with a top speed of 240 mph and a 0-60 mph time of just three seconds.

If that doesn’t get you more excited to part ways with your $4 million, we don’t know what will.

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1997 McLaren F1 for sale

1997 McLaren F1 for sale

We’ve seen a lot of awesome cars being sold through Jameslist, so it really doesn’t surprise us to see a 1997 McLaren F1 that’s been put up for sale on the site.

There are very few cars in this planet that have had a lasting stay on our wishlists, but the McLaren F1 is certainly one of them. Sure, the chances of us actually owning one are remote at best, but that doesn’t mean one of you can’t fork up the money to buy it.

This particular McLaren F1 only has 6,711 miles on its odometer and it comes with all the original niceties, including a full tool kit in the rolling box, the McLaren Luggage collection, and even the McLaren watch that comes with the car’s very own Chassis Number, an important piece in the whole package to authenticate the supercar as the real deal. What’s more, all the necessary taxes have already been paid for – import and VAT – so you won’t need to worry about forking over that extra money to make the purchase.

The price of the car is available upon request so if you’re interested, you might want to hit these guys up.

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Video: McLaren F1 tested on Japanese road

With only 100 units built, seeing a McLaren F1 on the streets is quite a rarity. And if you throw in the amount it takes to own one, the chances of ever driving an F1 are even smaller than just seeing one. That being said, some guys over in Japan were lucky enough to get behind the wheel of the British supercar and take it for a little joyride. Just listen to to the sound of the engine as the music flows out of the exhaust! Turn up your volume and enjoy!

The McLaren F1 is powered by a 6.1 liter, quad-cam, 48-valve V12 power unit that produces no less than 627 HP and drives through a bespoke six-speed transaxle gearbox. In March 1998, the F1 laid waste to the then-world record for the fastest production car in the world when it topped out at a speed of 240.14mph.

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1995 McLaren F1 for sale

1995 McLaren F1 for sale

How are your savings these days? By any chance, do you happen to have an extra $3,175,000 in your bank account? If you do and you want to own a piece of history, then this is the right news for you.

A 1995 McLaren F1 with only 300 miles on the odometer is now available for sale in Malibu, California by Gemballa North America. Okay, the mere fact that it’s a McLaren F1 makes the price tag a little justified, but what makes this car better than all other F1s in the world? It’s the first production McLaren F1 - ever.

It is powered by a 6.1 liter, quad-cam, 48-valve V12 power unit that produces no less than 627 HP and drives through a bespoke six-speed transaxle gearbox. In March 1998, the F1 laid waste to the then world record for the fastest production car in the world when it topped out at a speed of 240.14mph. The record stool unbroken for the next seven years where it was finally broken in March 2005 by the Koenigsegg CCR and then the Bugatti Veyron a few moths later.

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