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How Does the McLaren GT's Weight Stack Up Against Other Great Models?

How Does the McLaren GT’s Weight Stack Up Against Other Great Models?

The Ferrari Portofinos and the Aston Martin DB11s of the world may have something to worry about now

McLaren promised to roll out a mid-engined grand tourer, and when McLaren makes a promise, you know it’s going to deliver. It didn’t take long for the British supercar brand to come through on its word because the McLaren GT is here, and it looks every bit like the performance grand tourer the folks over at Woking, England said it would be. Classifications notwithstanding, the GT is more potent than the 570GT and more practical than the 650S. It’s also as light as a feather, at least when you compare it to other grand tourers of its ilk. Combine its weight with its power and performance capabilities, and McLaren could be onto something when it described the GT as a superlight supercar with perception-altering potential.

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McLaren GT vs McLaren F1

McLaren GT vs McLaren F1

Supercar practicality revisited 26 years later

McLaren just unveiled its most practical mid-engined sports car yet. It’s called the GT, and it offers up to 20.1 cubic feet of luggage room combined. But the GT isn’t McLaren’s first practical vehicle. Although it’s a spiritual successor to the 570GT, the GT is actually the third McLaren to feature a proper trunk. The first car to offer some practicality was the F1, McLaren’s very first production car for road use. Let’s find out more about that in the comparison below.

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McLaren GT vs McLaren 570GT

McLaren GT vs McLaren 570GT

Is the new GT a big improvement?

The McLaren GT is the company’s take on the grand tourer segment. But unlike grand tourers from carmakers like Aston Martin, Bentley, and Mercedes-Benz, the GT features a mid-engined layout. As wild as it may sound, the GT isn’t the first mid-engined grand tourer from McLaren. It follows in the footsteps of the 570GT, a 570S with luggage room atop the engine that was introduced in 2016. Is the new GT a notable improvement over the 570GT? Let’s find out!

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McLaren 600LT vs McLaren 570S

McLaren 600LT vs McLaren 570S

Longtail vs range-topping performance

A few years ago, McLaren was still a very small company that had few models on offer. This changed in 2015, when the Brits added a new lineup, the Sports Series. Placed under the Super Series family which includes the 650S and 675LT, among others, the Sports Series is the brand’s most affordable line of cars. It debuted with the 570S and 540C, but it soon grew to include the 570S Spider, the less track-focused 570GT, and the race-spec 570S GT4 and 570S Sprint. In 2018, McLaren finally granted the Sports Series access to its exclusive Longtail lineup and launched the 600LT.

Essentially an upgrade to the 570S, the 600LT uses more extreme aerodynamics and a more powerful engine. It’s quicker and more agile on the race track, yet it remains road-legal, sliding just under the track-only 570S GT4. So how does it compare to the 570S, the lineup’s range-topping model for three years? Let’s find out in the comparison below.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Putting The McLaren Senna's Power-To-Weight Ratio Into Perspective

Putting The McLaren Senna’s Power-To-Weight Ratio Into Perspective

Lining up the numbers, for science

While you certainly won’t find us complaining when automakers boast about crazy peak output figures and power-to-weight ratios, it’s always a good idea to put those numbers into perspective. Take the recently released McLaren Senna. Tagged with a name that pays respect to the legendary Brazilian racing driver Ayrton Senna, this machine is offered as the Woking company’s “most extreme” road car ever created. Not only does it have the most powerful engine to ever bless a street-legal McLaren, with 789 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque hitting the rear axle by way of a turbocharged 4.0-liter V-8, but its also the lightest street-legal McLaren ever made, tipping the scales at a scant 2,641 pounds thanks to oodles of exotic materials and motorsports-inspired construction. That’s the dry weight, by the way, not the curb weight. The end result is 658 horsepower per metric ton, or 598 horsepower per U.S. ton.

Impressive stuff, no doubt about it. That power-to-weight ratio bests even the mighty P1, which lays down 903 hybridized horses to motivate 3,075 pounds of dry weight, which calculates to 587 horsepower per U.S. ton. The iconic McLaren F1 is also defeated, producing 627 horsepower and tipping the scales with 2,425 pounds of dry weight, calculating out to 517 horsepower per U.S. ton. Meanwhile, the daily-driver oriented McLaren 650S Spider is left in the spec sheet dust, producing 641 horsepower with a dry weight of 3,020 pounds, which calculates as just 425 horsepower per U.S. ton

Of course, there’s much more that goes into making speed than a stellar power-to-weight ratio. Just as important (if not more so) is how that power reaches the pavement. For example, it’s a rather straightforward process to make 1,000 horsepower from a tuned 2JZ-powered Toyota Supra, but if you’re running all-season tires, all you’ll make is smoke. Traction, torque curves, aerodynamics… all help translate that ratio into real-world velocity, the stuff that really matters.

With that in mind, read on for the power-to-weight ratios of a few more high-end performance machines.

Continue reading to learn more about power-to-weight ratios.

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Video: Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. Ferrari 458 Speciale Vs. McLaren 650S

Video: Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. Ferrari 458 Speciale Vs. McLaren 650S

In a track-day event we are drooling over, AutoCar pitted three of the most well-renowned supercars against each other and against the clock in a competition for king. Set along the winding track of Castle Combe, the three cars battle it out for supremacy.

Steve Sutcliffe is our host and carefully walks us through the three cars one at a time, going back and forth between them like a chef careful to test each masterfully prepared dish. And while we’re not going to spoil the outcome, each car shows its strength and weakness.

Without giving anything away, the Porsche 911 GT3 deserves a medal solely on value. It competes very well with the McLaren and Ferrari costing literally twice as much. The McLaren seems to be Sutcliffe’s favorite driving car and the Ferrari comes across as one of the best vehicles to ever leave Maranello.

So which one wins? Click full screen, turn on HD, and crank the sound. You’ll enjoy the next 12 minutes.

Click past the jump for more info on each car

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Video: BAC Mono Vs. McLaren P1

Video: BAC Mono Vs. McLaren P1

It’s true that very few supercars can match the awesomeness of the McLaren P1, but when it comes to track hooning, there’s more to a car than just brute power and torque. Take the Bugatti Veyron for instance. It comes with more than 1,000 horsepower on tap, which makes it one of the most powerful supercars in production. Is it a proper track car? Not quite. In fact, we don’t see it taking laps very often, which says a lot about its racing capabilities. Race it against the Caterham 620R and you’re bound to lose.

Which brings us to the video below, in which an utterly powerful McLaren P1 is chased by an ultra-light BAC Mono on the Silverstone track. Comparing the P1’s 903 horsepower with the BAC Mono’s 285 ponies, it’s easy to say the latter is no match for the McLaren. However, bring the curb weight into the equation and the 600-horsepower gap reduces dramatically. That’s because the BAC Mono weighs in at only 1,190 pounds, which means 479 horses per tonne. On the other hand, the McLaren tips the scales at 3,280 pounds, resulting into a horsepower per tonne rating of 551 ponies. Not that big of a difference, huh?

This pretty much explains why the BAC Mono in the video above manages to catch up and overtake the McLaren P1, although the supercar is obviously faster in a straight line. The lightweight sports car is superior at entering and exiting corners, which proves once again you don’t need nearly 1,000 horsepower to be fast on the track. Hit the play button to watch the action.

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