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The McLaren BP23 Will Probably be Called the McLaren GT When it Goes Into Production

The McLaren BP23 Will Probably be Called the McLaren GT When it Goes Into Production

There goes any chance of the car being named the McLaren Hakkinen

It’s no secret that McLaren is developing a follow-up hypercar to the P1. Internally, the model is called by its prototype designation, “BP23.” Externally, it could be called the McLaren GT, if a recent trademark filing by McLaren is to be believed. If the filing is accurate, it would put to bed any speculation on what the new hypercar is going to be called. I suppose we’re going to have to wait a little longer for the McLaren Hakkinen to arrive.

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The Geneva Motor Show Is Where The Fastest Of The Fast Strut Their Stuff

The Geneva Motor Show Is Where The Fastest Of The Fast Strut Their Stuff

Looking for Earth-shattering output and a price tag to match? Then head over to Switzerland

If you ever need a reminder that yes, we are indeed living in a golden age of performance automobiles, just check out the list of debuts heading to this year’s Geneva International Motor Show. Specs and figures that would have been considered outlandish and silly just a few decades ago are now becoming the norm, as million-dollar, 1,000+ horsepower monster machines seem to litter the Palexpo convention center floor in 2018. Here are some of the highlights.

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McLaren Senna Is Quicker than P1, Generates Incredible Downforce

McLaren Senna Is Quicker than P1, Generates Incredible Downforce

Top speed is lower though

When it unveiled the Senna back in December 2017, McLaren omitted some of the supercar’s performance facts. Needless to say, the Senna was downright spectacular even without those figures to run by, but McLaren just released a batch of new information that proves this supercar is as quick as it looks.

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Wallpaper of the Day: One-Off 2018 McLaren 720S by MSO

Wallpaper of the Day: One-Off 2018 McLaren 720S by MSO

It’s a McLaren, it’s a one-off, it’s the perfect wallpaper!

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Wallpaper of the Day: McLaren 570GT Sport Pack

Wallpaper of the Day: McLaren 570GT Sport Pack

2018 McLaren 570GT
Check out the latest on the McLaren 570GT Sport Pack Want to Know More? McLaren 570
Read our full review on the 2017 McLaren 570GT.
Read our full review on the 2016 McLaren 570S.

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Wallpaper Selection of the Day: 1993 McLaren F1

Wallpaper Selection of the Day: 1993 McLaren F1

This legendary icon never strays too far from our hearts

1993 McLaren F1
Read our full review of the 1993 McLaren F1 or check out the gallery below for more wallpapers of this iconic beauty!

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2019 McLaren Senna

2019 McLaren Senna

The latest Ultimate Series is a track-ready tribute to Ayrton Senna

A successful race car builder from the 1960s to the 1980s, McLaren began making a name for itself as a road car manufacturer in the early 1990s with the F1. Launched with many benchmarks, including the first carbon-fiber construction, the F1 became one of the most iconic supercars ever made. It was so great that it took McLaren 15 years to gives us a predecessor, the P1, introduced at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show. Four years have passed, and the McLaren Ultimate Series is entering a new era with a brand-new supercar. Codenamed the P15 and in the rumor mill for a couple of years now, the McLaren Senna was unveiled on December 9, 2017, as the company’s ultimate road-legal race car.

A unique design that brings together styling cues from the P1, 720S, and new aerodynamic features, the Senna bears the name of F1 driver Ayrton Senna, who drove McLaren Formula One cars for six years, from 1988 to 1993.

While the Senna’s aggressive design and aerodynamics aren’t surprising, the fact that it’s not a hybrid comes as a bit of shock. With its predecessor sporting an electric motor, the new Ultimate Series was expected to have a similar layout. The same goes for the interior, which has a standard left-hand-drive configuration, despite prototypes that have a mid-mounted driver’s seat, like the old F1. But this doesn’t make the Senna a less spectacular supercar. On the contrary!

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren Senna.

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Meet the 2019 McLaren Senna – Track-Going Evil With a Hunger For the Road

Meet the 2019 McLaren Senna – Track-Going Evil With a Hunger For the Road

We’ll hand it to McLaren; it is extreme

The McLaren Senna, aka the P15, has finally arrived and it comes to the party toting a 4.0-liter V-8 that delivers 789 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque – the most powerful engine that McLaren has stuffed in a road-going supercar so far. But, it’s not just the power that makes this thing downright potent. See, the Senna is also the lightest road-going car built by McLaren to date (with the exception of the legendary F1,) tipping the scales at just 1,198 kg or 2,641 pounds – that’s less than the minimum curb weight for the 2017 Honda Civic, 2017 Subaru BRZ, and the BMW 3 Series. And, it’s no more than 300 pounds heavier than the 2017 Mazda MX-5 Miata. Sure, they are in a different class, but that’s the point. All told the car is so light that it has a power-to-weight ratio of 658 horsepower per ton – a staggering figure to say the least. Those are just the basics, though, so keep reading to learn more!

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2019 McLaren BP23

2019 McLaren BP23

McLaren’s spiritual successor to the iconic F1 could debut in 2018

As a successful race car builder since the 1960s, McLaren’s decision to launch its first road-legal car in the early 1990s made a huge impact on the British firm. Although the F1 was its sole vehicle for many years, and the SLR and then the MP4-12C stood as McLaren’s only offerings during their tenure, 2013 brought both the 650S and the P1. For the very first time, the Brits had two cars in dealerships. A couple of years later and the Super Series expanded to include more versions, while the more affordable Sports Series arrived to complete a trio of nameplates. Come 2017 and McLaren launched the Senna, a successor to the P1. But contrary to spy shots and rumors, the Senna doesn’t have a three-seat layout like the F1, which means that McLaren may be working on another flagship vehicle as we speak.

Okay, it may sound a bit confusing, so let me explain. When word got out of a successor to the P1, reports talked about a car codenamed the P15. It was supposed to be a more radical version of the P1 with a more powerful hybrid drivetrain. Later on, reports started talking about the BP23, also known as the Hyper-GT, a supercar with a three-seat layout with the driver in the middle, just like the F1. With no confirmation that McLaren was actually working on two different cars, the successor to the P1 was eventually believed to be the BP23. Now that the Senna is official, it’s pretty obvious that McLaren had different plans and will launch a new supercar soon. Whether it will hit the market alongside the Senna or go into production after the current model is discontinued remains unclear, but it will most definitely have the three-seat layout and a hybrid drivetrain.

The latter is more likely now that the Senna arrived as a gasoline-only model. McLaren said that half of its models will go hybrid by 2022 and the project should include the flagship models as the Sports Series line needs to remain affordable, thus use V-8 power only. But let’s find out more about the BP23 in the speculative review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren P15

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Oops: Newly Wed Couple Crash a Rented McLaren 650S

Oops: Newly Wed Couple Crash a Rented McLaren 650S

Someone’s going to have to answer for this, and the estimated repair costs won’t look pretty

A wedding is supposed to be one of the happiest days in a person’s life. It’s especially important for the bride and groom, though I can argue that guests can have their own version of fun at these events. Unfortunately, things can still go awry, as one person will attest after crashing a rented McLaren 650S into a tree in what could very well be one of the most ill-timed and expensive attempts at showing off.

Specific details on what happened are still unclear, but the end result is as crystal as they come. The rented McLaren 650S incurred significant damage because the driver thought it was a good idea to mess around with the supercar’s launch control figure. I’m not sure if the driver didn’t know the purpose of launch control or he just made a mistake in engaging it; it doesn’t matter now either way. The point is that because of his tomfoolery, the 650S’ front end is barely recognizable after smooching with the tree. The hood looks like a crumpled piece of paper and both air bags actually deployed. All of that means that the 650S probably launched close to where the tree was and the suddenness of the car’s acceleration startled the driver, leaving him with precious little time to correct his error to at least avoid hitting the tree.

I don’t know who’s going to have to foot the bill for the supercar’s repairs, but I can tell you that given its state, I wouldn’t be surprised if the cost of repairs goes up to six figures. Lesson learned, folks. There’s no harm in renting a McLaren 650S for a wedding and then proudly show it off to all the other guests. Just make sure you know what you’re getting yourself into. And don’t forget to purchase the best insurance policy at the rental counter.

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Brace Yourselves, A Track-Focused Successor To The McLaren P1 Is Coming!

Brace Yourselves, A Track-Focused Successor To The McLaren P1 Is Coming!

Model will be limited to just 500 units, priced at around $814,000

The super competitive world of hypercars can be really amazing. Not only do we get some of the fastest and most powerful driving machines from it, but we also see first-hand how this space has spurred a competitive arms race among automakers. It’s great to see these companies embrace the challenge of innovation and dive in head-first. Take McLaren for example. The British automaker has already given us the P1 hypercar, and now it’s all set to follow that up with a successor that will apparently include a track-focused model that will be faster than the P1.

Word of this development comes by way of Autocar, which is reporting the new model, codenamed P15, will not only be faster than any McLaren model other than the P1 GTR, but it will also be much lighter than its predecessor. In fact, one of McLaren’s intended goals for this model is for it to have a much better power-to-weight ratio than the P1, allowing it to be much faster around the race track than the automaker’s ground-breaking hypercar. The report also says that the P15 will feature the company’s new Monocage II carbon fiber monocoque while also making extensive use of active aerodynamics to allow it to have better performances on a race track. Specific details are expected to be announced as the project advances, although it is being reported at this point that McLaren will only build 500 units of the model featuring just one variant, likely being a coupe, with a price tag of about €700,000, or around $814,000 based on current exchange rates.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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1993 McLaren F1

1993 McLaren F1

Arguably the most iconic supercar of the 1990s

The McLaren F1 was unveiled in May 1992 and was the company’s first road-going production car. The idea was born in the late 1980s, when Gordon Murray, the technical director of McLaren’s Formula One, began sketching the F1 as a three-seat supercar. Appointed as head of McLaren Cars in 1991, Murray convinced Ron Dennis to build the vehicle and played a key role in the design of the F1. It was unlike any other supercar launched up to that point. It had a race-inspired design, a three-seat configuration with the driver seat in the middle, and a comfortable ride for a vehicle of its kind. It was also the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis and the first to bring high-tech and expensive materials such as titanium, magnesium, Kevlar, and gold under the same roof.

Not only powerful and quick, the F1 was also the world’s fastest production car. Its record endured from 1992 until 2005, when Bugatti unleashed the ludicrous Veyron. The F1 spawned a couple of special-edition models such as the LM and the GT, but it was also used as a base for the GTR race car. Essentially a standard F1 with aerodynamic improvements, the GTR went on to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in its first year on the race track.

Some 25 years have passed since its introduction and the F1 is already considered a classic. Usually changing owners for millions of dollars, the F1 is one of the very few multi-million-dollar supercars built in the 1990s.

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1995 McLaren F1 LM

1995 McLaren F1 LM

The quickest, most powerful, and most expensive F1 ever built

The McLaren F1 was launched in 1992 and revolutionized the supercar industry more than any other vehicle since the automobile was invented. It was not only the first production car to use a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis, but also the first to bring high-tech and expensive materials such as titanium, magnesium, Kevlar, and gold under the same roof. It also had an impressive drag coefficient of only 0.32, a smart interior made of lightweight materials, luggage compartments implemented in each rear fender, and a three-seat configuration with the driver placed in the middle, just like in a Formula One car.

Developed and built by Gordon Murray, arguably the best designed since Colin Chapman, the F1 also spawned a successful race car that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans at its first attempt, as well as a number of limited-edition models that went on to become some of the rarest and most expensive cars launched in 1990s. One of them is the F1 LM, a supercar McLaren built to celebrate its Le Mans victory in 1995. The LM was limited to only five example, the exact number of F1 GTRs that finished the race.

Arguably the quickest and most powerful road car at the time of its introduction, the LM went on to become the most expensive road-going McLaren and a highly sought-after collectible. Find out what makes it special in our full review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1 LM.

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McLaren P1 Passes The 200 MPH Barrier At The Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds: Video

McLaren P1 Passes The 200 MPH Barrier At The Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds: Video

Very few will ever actually hit the max speed in the P1, but now you can see what it looks like

The Geneva Motor Show is always overpopulated with a number of supercars each year, and in 2014, that is exactly where the McLaren P1 made its long-awaited debut as the successor to the McLaren F1. Despite strong competition from models like the Ferrari LaFerrari and the Lamborghini Veneno, all 375 planned production models had been spoken for by the end of 2013. And, there is a good reason for it, with one of them being showcased in the video you’re about to watch.

In the video, you’ll see a number of different cars from Porsche to Lamborghini lined up on the landing strip, but this video – at least the last half of it – is focused around the P1. At first, I thought all the cars were going to make a break for the sound barrier, and that would have been a pretty gnarly race, but instead we get to see the P1 doing what it does best – going fast.

The video itself has some awesome sound effects and some quality music playing in the background, but the coolest part is the in-cabin view of the P1 pushing past the 200 mph barrier. The title of the video says the P1 hits 205 mph, but in reality, we see that speedo tick up to 207 at the last second. Just wait until you see the aerial view of the P1 on its sprint – it looks like a rocket as it barrels down the track. Let us know what you think and enjoy the video!

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2016 McLaren 650S Can-Am

2016 McLaren 650S Can-Am

In 1966, the world of racing birthed the Canadian-American Challenge Cup, a sports car series that offered entrants a good deal of flexibility when it came to technical and mechanical specification. As a result, competitors frequently pushed the limits of go-faster tech, especially in the areas of aerodynamics, forced induction, and lightweight materials. One such innovator was New Zealand-born Bruce McLaren, who entered the championship in its inaugural season, eventually going on to take five consecutive championship titles between 1967 and 1971. Now, five decades later, the automaker that bears Bruce’s name is celebrating that dominating performance with this limited-edition 650S Spider.

“Can-Am racing is a major part of McLaren heritage, and this latest model from MSO pays homage to the cars and the racers who played a key role in making the championship such a spectacle during the 1960s and ‘70s,” says Paul Mackenzie, Executive Director of McLaren Special Operations.

While mechanically unaltered over the standard 650S Spider, the 650S Can-Am does bear a variety of exterior modifications that do well in acknowledging McLaren’s past. But can this modern take really recapture some of those old glories?

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren 650S Can-Am.

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1997 McLaren F1 GT

1997 McLaren F1 GT

Built in 106 examples between 1992 and 1998, the McLaren F1 is now arguably the most valuable production car sold in the 1990s, with many units changing owners for millions of dollars.

There are many reasons for that.

First, it was by far the most innovative supercar of its era. It was lighter and more powerful than anything else in dealerships at the time, it was the first production car to feature a carbon-fiber monocoque and a center-mounted driver’s seat. Second, it was the world’s fastest production car for no fewer than 12 consecutive years, at 240.1 mph. Bugatti had to build a quad-turbo monster with more than 1,000 horsepower to defeat it. Third, the F1 spawned numerous road-legal and racing versions, with most of them considered a lot more valuable than the standard car.

One such model is the F1 GT, of which McLaren built only three examples in 1997, only half the production output of the 1995 McLaren F1 LM. The GT was actually the final incarnation of the road-going F1, developed as a homologation special for the race-spec 1995 - 1997 McLaren F1 GTR used throughout the 1997 FIA GT Championship, among other racing events. The GT is the rarest F1 ever built. Keep reading to find out what makes this supercar special.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1 GT.

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Six Reasons Why the McLaren F1 Is Still the World's Coolest Supercar

Six Reasons Why the McLaren F1 Is Still the World’s Coolest Supercar

It’s been nearly five decades since the Lamborghini Miura started the mid-engined supercar craze, and this exclusive automotive niche has evolved beyond the wildest dreams. All motors have been replaced by turbocharged engines, standard transmissions gave way to Formula One-based units, and aerodynamics reached a point where very few improvements can still be made.

More recently, carmakers turned to electrification to improve performance and reduce fuel consumption and emissions. Technology continues to set new standards with each year, while luxury features have become mandatory for success. In all, there’s a huge gap between the 1966 Lamborghini Miura and the 2014 Ferrari LaFerrari, one that was hard to predict a few decades ago.

My goal here is not to list everything that changed, but, just to make a point, it’s important to stress that top speed alone has increased dramatically. While supercars barely made it past 170 mph in the late 1960s, blasting past 200 mph has become the norm today. Some supercars, such as the Bugatti Veyron, have set world records beyond 240 mph.

But how important are these numbers beyond statistics? It really depends on what tickles your fancy. To some, the Bugatti Veyron is the ultimate supercar due to its incredible top speed, luxurious interior and the endless customization options offered for it. Others turn to the LaFerrari to get their supercar fix, simply because all that speed comes with a spaceship-like design and a Prancing Horse on the nose.

I, on the other hand, like my supercars old-fashioned. And by that I mean I need them to be more that just a statement of speed and luxury. Originally, supercars were meant to fulfill the dream of being able to drive a race car on the street. Or, better said, to be able to drive it to the track, change a few settings, and fight for glory.

In an era when only enthusiasts such as Jim Glickenhaus build supercars that can do just that, it’s safe to say those days are long gone. However, some supercars from the past are still here to entertain gearheads like me. The McLaren F1 is one of them, the kind of supercar I would prefer to any modern hypercar.

Why? Glad you asked! Keep reading to find out what makes the McLaren F1 the world’s coolest supercar more than two decades since its official introduction.

Continue reading to learn more about the McLaren F1.

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McLaren Officially Confirms Track Version Of The P1 Supercar

McLaren Officially Confirms Track Version Of The P1 Supercar

McLaren Automotive has announced its financial results for 2013, posting record revenues of $477.90 million (£285.4 million) for the year. While this is great news for the company, the Brits unveiled something even more exciting for its customers: the rumored track-focused P1 supercar will hit race courses in 2015.

There is some bad new though, as the race-ready P1 will be available only to clients who have ordered one of the 375 standard and road-legal P1s. So unless you either have one parked in your garage or on its way, no soup for you! However, owning a street-spec P1 doesn’t necessarily mean you’re entitled to buy and hoon such a track beast. McLaren says this purposed vehicle will be its rarest yet, meaning only a handful of them will be built. Production figures have yet to be released, but don’t expect them to be assembled by the hundreds.

Although details about the track-prepped P1 are still under wraps, we have a hunch the Brits are working on an extreme aerodynamic body, and an upgraded suspension specifically tuned for the race course. An output update is also on the table, but we’re not betting on massive improvements in the horsepower and torque departments.

In addition to confirming the new track toy, McLaren also announced that the P13 sports car will become available in more than one version. No actual details were given, but the entry-level vehicle is likely to roll out in coupe and convertible guises, and, later in its life, with a GT suit as well.

Click past the jump to read more about the McLaren P1.

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