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Are Cars Without Windshields Becoming a Trend?

Are Cars Without Windshields Becoming a Trend?

The McLaren Elva is the latest example of this

McLaren unveiled the Elva supercar earlier this week, and among its many unique features, it included one that has become trendy among supercar brands in recent years. Folks, the Elva is the first production McLaren that doesn’t have a windshield. In fact, it doesn’t have a roof, either. Windows? What are those?

As striking and unique as the Elva is, it’s not the first performance car to adopt this kind of appearance. In this decade alone, there have been a number of other performance vehicles that were created with the little-to-no-windshield design. Some arrived as concepts while others turned into production models. Either way, these five vehicles pulled the design off to varying degrees of success.

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2020 McLaren Elva

2020 McLaren Elva

The most radical McLaren to date has no windscreen and pays tribute to a race car from the 1960s

The 2021 McLaren Elva is a brand-new supercar that the British firm added to its Ultimate Series lineup, alongside the Senna and the Speedtail. A two-seat open-cockpit design, it’s inspired by a series of race cars built by Bruce McLaren in the 1960s under the McLaren-Elva name. It’s McLaren’s first open-cockpit road car and its lightest road-going vehicle yet. A track-ready roadster with an aerodynamic design, the 2021 Elva features the most powerful iteration of McLaren’s twin-turbo, 4.0-liter V-8 engine. Rated at 804 horsepower, it slots above the Senna in terms of power and falls behind only the Speedtail hybrid. Let’s find out more about this beast in the review below.

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The New McLaren Elva Is Faster Than the Senna, Lighter Than Any Other Modern Road-Going McLaren

The New McLaren Elva Is Faster Than the Senna, Lighter Than Any Other Modern Road-Going McLaren

And it’s McLaren’s first open-cockpit road car

McLaren is on a roll to diversify its sports car lineup as much as possible, and the 2020 Elva is the latest creation to join the Ultimate Series family. Included in the same lineage as the P1, Senna, and Speedtail, the Elva is McLaren’s first-ever open-cockpit two-seater. A tribute to the iconic McLaren Elva race car that Bruce McLaren designed in the 1960s, the Elva is the company’s lightest road car. Rated at 804 horsepower, it’s also the most powerful non-hybrid McLaren, but it’s also among the most expensive with pricing set at £1.42 million (around $1.8 million as of November 2019).

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The Hennessey C7 Corvette ZR1 HPE 1200 Can Kick the Hell Out of a McLaren 720S

The Hennessey C7 Corvette ZR1 HPE 1200 Can Kick the Hell Out of a McLaren 720S

There might be a catch, though

The McLaren 720S was built with one thing and mind and one thing only. And that’s blistering performance through a combination of power and lightness. The C7 Corvette ZR1 is a nod to the same creed, but it lacks the McLaren’s innate ability to dance around a twisty circuit. While it’s obviously not as light on its feet like the Macca, this particular ZR1 got a helping hand from America’s controversial tuner Hennessey. The helping hand is the HPE 1200 upgrade, one that turned the Corvette into a McLaren 720S squasher. Or dit it?

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Someone Leaked the Limited-Edition McLaren BC-03 And We Want More of It!

Someone Leaked the Limited-Edition McLaren BC-03 And We Want More of It!

Is this the hypercar McLaren has been rumored to work on?

Remember the Ultimate Vision Gran Turismo concept that came out of McLaren’s fling with PlayStation back in 2017? Get ready to meet a toned-down production version of it soon, because someone’s been naughty enough to leak two pictures of the upcoming McLaren BC-03, a limited-edition hypercar that looks a lot like the Gran Turismo Sport-bound prototype.

Rumors about the upcoming limited-edition McLaren hypercar have been floating on the internet for around a year without too many details to back them up. A recent leak, however, chases the fog away on this otherwise very hot topic. Bear with us for this one.

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Shmee150 Delivers Update on the State of His Beloved McLaren Senna

Shmee150 Delivers Update on the State of His Beloved McLaren Senna

It’s been two months since the Senna was involved in a road accident

Two months after figuring into a road mishap that resulted in significant damages to his McLaren Senna, YouTube star Shmee150 has returned to give us an update on the state of his beloved supercar. Turns out, the Senna remains in the hands of McLaren where it’s still in the middle of getting repaired.

Specific parts that were damaged from the road accident have just arrived in the McLaren workshop so it will still take a few months before the Senna is restored, good as new, and returned to its anxious winner. The video isn’t just about Shmee150. It also gives us a good look at the inner workings of McLaren’s car repair process and the painstaking lengths and attention-to-detail that comes with making sure that every square inch of the Senna is investigated, prodded over, and repaired if the situation calls of it. At some point in the next few months, Shmee150 will be reunited with his McLaren Senna. But for now, it remains in the hands of McLaren, waiting for the automaker to bring it back to life.

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2019 McLaren F1 #063 Restoration by MSO

2019 McLaren F1 #063 Restoration by MSO

And by restoration we mean the taking-the-engine-apart-and-rebuilding-it kind of job

When it comes to rare supercars, the McLaren F1 is right up there in the automotive world’s charts. McLaren built just 106 units of the F1 between 1993 and 1998, but not all of them were road legal. In fact, only 64 units were “standard” road cars, with 28 wearing the GTR badge which made them track-only, race-bred machines. There were also five prototypes, named XP1 to XP5, and two longtail versions, among other iterations. Now, let’s go back to 12 months ago when McLaren was announcing the introduction of its MSO McLaren F1 Heritage program. To mark the launch, McLaren showed off the F1 25R bathed in the notorious Gulf Racing livery. One year later, McLaren strikes again with a perfectly-restored F1, which happens to be chassis number 63.

All in all, McLaren needed 3,000 work hours to complete it, with the actual restoration process spanning over 18 months. Mind-boggling as that might sound, consider this: repainting the car with the original Magnesium Silver hue alone took 900 hours, so there’s that. Oh, and don’t even think of checking your bank accounts. The car has an owner who already received his restored gem, together with a unique certificate of authenticity, a bespoke book that illustrates the car’s history, and a 3D laser-scanned miniature McLaren F1 scale model. Yeah, we’re also jealous. And with that out of the way, let’s have a more in-depth look at chassis #63.

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McLaren's New Hyper Roadster Will Be a True Driver's Car; Could Be Lighter Than the F1 and Faster Than the Senna

McLaren’s New Hyper Roadster Will Be a True Driver’s Car; Could Be Lighter Than the F1 and Faster Than the Senna

McLaren’s open-top hypercar will replace the stunning P1, undercut Senna’s weight and become the best road-legal driver’s car from Woking ever made

Announced a few months back, the new Ultimate Series McLaren hypercar will appear as the most extreme McLaren in the lineup. Lighter than the P1, and possibly more potent than the Senna, the new hypercar will come without the roof but with a carbon-fiber monocoque chassis, and ultimate abilities in terms of driving dynamics.

“We’re developing the next chapter in our Ultimate Series story, and we want to produce a car that’s focused on the thrills of driving and with that an open experience. That’s important,” McLaren’s global marketing director Jamie Corstorphine said during the presentation of the latest McLaren GT in Australia.

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Someone Paid Enough for This Ultra-Rare McLaren F1 LM-Spec to Buy 87 Average Houses in the United States

Someone Paid Enough for This Ultra-Rare McLaren F1 LM-Spec to Buy 87 Average Houses in the United States

Sometimes, the value of money isn’t created equal, as is the case with this McLaren F1 LM.

The 2019 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance featured some of the most to-die-for cars in the world. One of the real stars of the show was a 1994 McLaren F1 “LM Specification”that lived up to its billing when it sold for a whopping $19.8 million at the RM Sotheby’s auction over the weekend. While it did sell below the auction house’s estimate of $21 million to $23 million, the $19.5 million selling price makes this specific McLaren F1 LM the most expensive McLaren ever sold in an auction setting. For a little perspective, the final selling price of this McLaren F1 LM is equal to buying 87 houses in the U.S. based on the median home listing, according to real estate and rental market place site Zillow. In other words, that’s a lot of houses for the price of one McLaren F1 LM.

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Video of the Day: 2020 McLaren 750 LT Testing On the Nurburgring

Video of the Day: 2020 McLaren 750 LT Testing On the Nurburgring

Yup – there’s another long tail on the way!

You didn’t think that McLaren was done making long tails, did you? Well, in case you did, we’re here to tell you that you thought wrong. The McLaren 720S is set to be the next model to be given the long tail treatment, and it should go by the 750S name. The name alone reveals that it should have some 750 PS (around 740 horsepower) which means it’ll deliver around 30 horsepower more than the 710-horsepower 720S. The particular model in this video is clearly a 720S that’s been converted for testing purposes, so it lacks some of the typical long tail aero, but there’s no denying that this is a mule for the 750 LT.

This becomes painfully obvious thanks to the more dominating splitter and sharp canards on the front fascia for increased downforce in the front. The rear is pretty void of any changes, but there is a roll cage inside. That roll cage won’t make it to the production model and is only there to protect the testing engineers in case something should go wrong as this baby tears ass around the Nurburgring as seen in this video. Expect the new 750 LT to be lighter, faster, and more track worthy than the 720 or the now-discontinued 675 LT.

And, since we know you’re curious about when we’ll see the official production model, word has it that we’ll see it at the 2020 Geneva Motor Show and it will be part of the automakers new Super Series lineup. But, we know you’re anxious to see the new 750 LT in action, so check that out in the video below!

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McLaren's Next Supercar Takes on Rare Porsches and an Even Rarer Lamborghini

McLaren’s Next Supercar Takes on Rare Porsches and an Even Rarer Lamborghini

McLaren has just announced what its next supercar will be and you’ll never guess it

Ladies and gentlemen, whenever McLaren announces a new car, various strata from the industry jumps for joy. Not the competition, of course, knowing how the McLarens of recent times are ready to give their rivals a rough run for their money. But even so, as soon as Woking has official details on a fresh model it’s working on, everyone spreads their antennas. This time, McLaren will step away from the usual sports car-supercar-grand tourer dance and build a speedster.

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Auction Watch: 1994 McLaren F1 "LM-Spec" - Will it Be the Most Valuable of the Year?

Auction Watch: 1994 McLaren F1 "LM-Spec" - Will it Be the Most Valuable of the Year?

If the auction house is bang on the money, this F1 is worth as much as the F1 XP-5 prototype

Automotive journalists and gearheads have been trying to fault - even if subconsciously - the McLaren F1 ever since it was introduced over 25 years ago. In a way, it’s something natural, that one desires to pick apart something that seems faultless. The McLaren F1 seems to do the job it was conceived to do flawlessly, ageing like the finest of wines from the best French vineyards. With the F40, one could argue that its spartan interior and lackluster build quality is what makes it not-so-perfect but the F1’s shut lines are akin to those on the most expensive Mercedes-Benz models of the day. Is it really perfect, though? That’s something you decide for yourself but what’s certain is that RM Sotheby’s thinks this F1 updated to LM specification is worth $23 million. If they’re right, it’ll become one of the most expensive cars ever sold at auction and the most expensive one sold in 2019.

The McLaren F1 is a special car, that’s something that everyone can agree upon, even folks that think cars are merely means of transport created to take you from A to B. It was created by one man with a vision helped by the fact that he was given a blank check. You don’t really see cost-no-object cars emerge in today’s finicky auto industry but, in the mid-’90s, bolstered by a string of impressive seasons in Formula 1, McLaren thought it could do the impossible and build the supercar to top all supercars, the supercar deserving of the title ’hypercar’. Sure, many people will continue to think the supercar has reached its peak with the F40 and the F1, with its practical interior that seats three, is simply deflecting from the purest of recipes that has been applied by Nicola Materazzi when creating the F40. No matter what side of the argument you’re on, this F1 in LM guise is worthy of a deeper look and, if you can, take a look at it in the flesh on the preview day before the three-day (August 15-17) auction kicks off.

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Gordon Murray is working on a spiritual McLaren F1 successor

Gordon Murray is working on a spiritual McLaren F1 successor

It’ll be ultra-light, on top of being usable everyday and in between those three seats there will be the stick for a manual box

Ever since McLaren unveiled the F1, people have been waiting, eyebrows up, for whatever else Gordon Murray might be cooking. The genius designer who made his name in the world of Formula 1 and designed such groundbreaking cars like the Brabham BT46B and the Brabham BT55 is finally ready to talk about his next creation. Named the T.50, it’s a car tailored after the F1 with a Cosworth-developed 3.9-liter, naturally aspirated V-12 developing 650 horsepower and 332 pound-feet of twist. The cabin will take three and, as is the case with the F1, Murray won’t make judgments on the top speed.

If last time around Murray was contracted by McLaren to create a road car that would incorporate the F1 know-how of Ron Dennis’ squad, now, it’s all done on Murray’s terms. That’s because the T.50 will be built by Gordon Murray Automotive and it will be designed top to bottom in-house by Gordon Murray Design. A carbon fiber monocoque will hide underneath the sleek body of the T.50, and this will ensure Murray-approved levels of lightness. Remember, the 72-year-old designer has never been a fan of the modern supercars and hypercars that put out buckets of horsepower only to be pegged back by a generous heft - like the 4,400 pounds of a standard Bugatti Chiron. As such, the T.50 will only weigh 2,160 pounds (under a tonne), and you can be sure you won’t miss one on the road since that V-12 will be able to rev all the way up to 12,1000 rpm! Yes, the T.50 will have four wheels, not two.

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2020 McLaren GT Gallery

2020 McLaren GT Gallery

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Video: How Fast Can the McLaren Senna Really Go?

Video: How Fast Can the McLaren Senna Really Go?

The numbers are impressive, but do they stack up to McLaren’s claims?

The McLaren Senna represents the pinnacle of McLaren engineering. It’s the result of the British automaker’s goal to build a more potent machine than the P1 hypercar without having to rely on the latter’s hybrid technology. McLaren achieved that goal when it turned it into a ground-breaking, lightweight supercar that defied even our highest of expectations. But as impressive as it was from a technical standpoint, the Senna still had to prove that its performance chops are as good as advertised. That opportunity finally came when the Senna did a top speed run at the Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds in Merritt Island, Florida. The results, as you might expect, came with a few surprises.

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Check Out This Outrageously Detailed Full-Scale Lego McLaren Senna

Check Out This Outrageously Detailed Full-Scale Lego McLaren Senna

Almost a half million bricks and 5,000 hours went into building it!

The 2019 McLaren Senna is a truly epic automobile, so it makes sense that this full-scale version from Lego is every bit as impressive. The details on this thing are outrageous, from the perfect exterior recreation, to an interior you can actually sit in, to the inclusion of real parts plucked straight from the actual road car. Compared to Lego’s previous builds, this is definitely one of the most impressive yet.

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