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Mercedes 190 E

1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II

1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II Exterior
- image 635890
  • Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II
  • Year:
    1990
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    235
  • 0-60 time:
    7.1 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    155 mph
  • Price:
    65000 (Est.)
  • car segment:
  • body style:

Homologation special. It’s not a term that gets applied to cars much anymore, but it’s brought us some great ones. Think, 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO, 1981-1991 Audi Sport Quattro, and 1973 Porsche 911 2.7 RS. The idea is to require a manufacturer to build ‘x’ number of road-going versions of whatever car it wants to take racing. It prevents engineers from coming up with anything too crazy and forms a tangible link between what fans see on the track and what they can put in their driveways. Then, a company like Toyota comes along and builds two road-going GT-One Le Mans racers and blows up the entire notion.

Then there’s the Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II. Debuting in 1990, the Evo II, as it came to be called, was designed to do one thing: beat BMW in Germany’s DTM touring car race series. Unlike the DTM of today, which is comprised of carbon-chassis, purpose-built silhouette racecars, the DTM of the early ’90s was populated with cars built on road-car platforms and powered by road-car engines.

After getting trounced by BMW M3s and the odd Ford Sierra Cosworth during the 1989 DTM season, Mercedes went to work updating its 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution. The 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show ahead of the 1990 season, with more power and a wild new body kit. All 502 road cars required for homologation sold out before it was even unveiled. At around the same time, AMG (still an independent company) went to work converting an allotment of Evo IIs to race cars.

The Evo II debuted in the third round of the 1990 season at the Nürburgring with Kurt Thiim behind the wheel. Thim went on to finish the season in third behind championship winner Hans-Joachim Stuck in an Audi V8 quattro and second-place Johnny Cecotto in a BMW M3 Sport Evolution. Things went a bit better in 1991, when Klaus Ludwig drove his Mercedes to second overall, again behind an Audi, but the Evo II didn’t hit its stride until the 1992 season, when Mercedes drivers Klaus Ludwig, Kurt Thiim and Bernd Schneider swept the top three championship spots.

Because of its extremely low volume and ridiculously high cost when new (reportedly $80,000 in 1990), the Evo II road cars didn’t enjoy the same exposure as the BMW M3, but those same factors are what make it so desirable and collectible 25 years after it was first built.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II.

 

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Car for Sale: Rare 1990 Mercedes-Benz 190-Series EVO 2 No. 55 of 500

Car for Sale: Rare 1990 Mercedes-Benz 190-Series EVO 2 No. 55 of 500

The Mercedes-Benz 190 EVO II was a homologation special that is very hard to come by these days. The model you see here is from 1990 and is No. 55 of just 500 made that year. This isn’t the first time we’ve seen one for sale, but with the ridiculous import laws here in the U.S., these beauties are just starting to make it into onto American soil. Originally aimed at BMW’s E30 M3 EVO, it was the most powerful iteration of a Mercedes’ E-Series at the time. And by power, I’m talking about a 2.50liter Cosworth engine that delivered some 232 horsepower to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual transmission.

Other features include hydraulic suspension, bolstered seats in the front and rear, and a lap timer for those who really like to hit the track on the weekend. As you can see, the car is rather aggressive compared to the standard E-Series at the time. What I like to call old-school styling, the car featured a sporty front fascia, wide fender flares in the front and rear, attractive side skirts, and a simple, but well-defined rear fascia. Plus, there’s that massive spoiler on the rear that is visual proof that this Mercedes doesn’t exactly play nicely with others.

If those performance numbers don’t sound that impressive to you, I feel bad for you son. But, I’ll put things into perspective for you a little bit. With 232 horsepower, this beast of a Mercedes could hit 62 mph in 7.1 seconds and reach a top speed of a shocking (not) 155 mph. Now, considering Mercedes entry-level CLA 250 of today comes with 208 horsepower on tap, I can understand your confusion, but back then this was a big deal as it was one of the fastest saloons of the early ‘90s. If it helps, the 1990 Chevy Camaro came with just 210 horsepower from a 5.7-liter V-8 in Iroc-Z trim.

Anyway, back to the car at hand, this specific model has just 29,852 miles on the clock and is currently owned by a collector in NYC. That collector purchased it from the original owner in France and imported it into the U.S. It is all original, rust free, and went through recent maintenance just 11,000 miles ago. The steering wheel has been replaced with a period-correct and rare AMG wheel that was used on the DTM race cars. The stock steering wheel does come with the car when purchased along with an original Becker retrofitted with an iPod cable in the glove box, all original tools, original spare tire, original emergency medical kit, and a maintenance book. The listing for this car still has two days left as of the time of this writing with the current bid at 144,100. The unknown reserve has not been met, but the car will likely go for somewhere in the range of $200,000 to $230,000.

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1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II

1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II

Homologation special. It’s not a term that gets applied to cars much anymore, but it’s brought us some great ones. Think, 1985 Ferrari 288 GTO, 1981-1991 Audi Sport Quattro, and 1973 Porsche 911 2.7 RS. The idea is to require a manufacturer to build ‘x’ number of road-going versions of whatever car it wants to take racing. It prevents engineers from coming up with anything too crazy and forms a tangible link between what fans see on the track and what they can put in their driveways. Then, a company like Toyota comes along and builds two road-going GT-One Le Mans racers and blows up the entire notion.

Then there’s the Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II. Debuting in 1990, the Evo II, as it came to be called, was designed to do one thing: beat BMW in Germany’s DTM touring car race series. Unlike the DTM of today, which is comprised of carbon-chassis, purpose-built silhouette racecars, the DTM of the early ’90s was populated with cars built on road-car platforms and powered by road-car engines.

After getting trounced by BMW M3s and the odd Ford Sierra Cosworth during the 1989 DTM season, Mercedes went to work updating its 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution. The 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show ahead of the 1990 season, with more power and a wild new body kit. All 502 road cars required for homologation sold out before it was even unveiled. At around the same time, AMG (still an independent company) went to work converting an allotment of Evo IIs to race cars.

The Evo II debuted in the third round of the 1990 season at the Nürburgring with Kurt Thiim behind the wheel. Thim went on to finish the season in third behind championship winner Hans-Joachim Stuck in an Audi V8 quattro and second-place Johnny Cecotto in a BMW M3 Sport Evolution. Things went a bit better in 1991, when Klaus Ludwig drove his Mercedes to second overall, again behind an Audi, but the Evo II didn’t hit its stride until the 1992 season, when Mercedes drivers Klaus Ludwig, Kurt Thiim and Bernd Schneider swept the top three championship spots.

Because of its extremely low volume and ridiculously high cost when new (reportedly $80,000 in 1990), the Evo II road cars didn’t enjoy the same exposure as the BMW M3, but those same factors are what make it so desirable and collectible 25 years after it was first built.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II.

Read more