Cars Mercedes Mercedes 300SL

Mercedes 300SL

1957 - 1962 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing (W194)

1957 - 1962 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing (W194)
- image 658626
  • Mercedes 300SL Gullwing (W194)
  • Year:
    1957- 1962
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Transmission:
    4-Speed Manual
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    215@5800
  • Torque @ RPM:
    4600
  • Displacement:
    2996 L
  • 0-60 time:
    8.2 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    152 mph

There is no technical definition for what makes a car a supercar, and as such, there will always be some disagreement about what car should be considered the first to have reached this status. There is no shortage of possible contenders, but the biggest debate is between the Lamborghini Miura and this, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL.

The 300SL was derived from a race car by the same name, which is noteworthy because it is usually the other way around, with race cars being built out of existing road-going models. It’s usually too difficult to go in the other direction, especially when you’re talking about a car that had overall wins at Le Mans, the Nurburgring and the Carrera Panamericana. But, in the ’50s, road cars and track cars weren’t so divorced from one another that it was impossible.

The idea for a Grand Prix car that was repurposed for road use was pitched to Mercedes by the Austrian-born, but New York-based importer and car dealer Max Hoffman, who would also go on to suggest several successful cars to Porsche. Because of this, the car debuted at the New York Auto Show, a first for a Mercedes product, and was instantly the hit of the show.

Continue reading to learn more about the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing.

37 photos

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Replica Go Karts Fetch Tremendous Prices At Mecum Auctions

Replica Go Karts Fetch Tremendous Prices At Mecum Auctions

One of them sold for Mercedes money

Millions upon millions of dollar flew all over the place over the weekend during the Mecum auction at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. A 1956 Aston Martin DBR1 had top billing when it sold for a whopping $22.5 million, becoming the most expensive British car in history. A collection of road-going Ferraris combined for $16.5 million, including a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB that sold for $8.3 million. Even Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s 2010 Koenigsegg CCXR Trevita found a new owner who paid a cool $2.8 million for it. Lost in all the hoopla surrounding the auction were four vehicles that look the part of classics from yesteryear, but are actually miniaturized replica go-karts. It’s quite amusing considering that of all the cars that did sell for at least seven figures, these four go-karts were stars of the show in their own right.

Don’t feel bad if you mistake any of these cars – a Ferrari 330 P2 Le Mans, a 1956 “Baby Ferrari” Bimbo Racer, a Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR, and a 1961 Jaguar E-Type Junior – for the real things in the pictures. Look at them in person, though, and it’s clear that they’re mini replicas. Still, it doesn’t take away from the sheer awesomeness of these cars, which really aren’t your typical go-karts either, since some of them do carry materials like a steel chassis and a fiberglass body. And for what their worth, they were actually sold for impressive prices, including one that fetched a price tag that would’ve otherwise been close enough to buy an actual, brand-new Mercedes CLA-Class Coupe.

Continue after the jump tor read the full story.

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1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Sold For $1.9 Million

1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Sold For $1.9 Million

The Mercedes 300 SL Gullwing has an interesting history, as it was originally nothing more than another race car in the early 1950s. An American importer by the name of Max Hoffman pressured Mercedes to turn the car into a road-going coupe for the masses, and eventually – in 1954 – Mercedes did just that. 1,400 units were built between 1954 and 1957, with a large majority going straight to the U.S. market. Since then, the car has become desirable and collectible, with examples going for more than $1 million in some cases. A recent sale of an example from 1954 was just sold by RK Motors Charlotte for a total of $1.9 million, marking a three-year high for the 1954 model.

Joseph Carroll, the president of RK Collection, said, “The ’54 Gullwing brought this record price because of its pristine condition and flawless mechanics.” He continued to say, “This typifies the exceptional quality of the vehicles we make available to car collectors both here in the U.S., and throughout the world. This is underscored by the fact that this transaction signifies a three-year high for a ’54 Gullwing, establishing a new price-point in the collector car market.”

This specific example, as shown in the picture above, had a silver body with red interior. It still had its original belly pans, books, tools, and even the optional Nardi steering wheel. In the 61 years of its existence, the car had only been driven a total of 45,687 miles – less than 1,000 miles per year. It should be noted that this isn’t the highest sale of a ’54 in recent years. Back in 2012, Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction sold one for $2.2 million. Regardless, someone bought themselves a fine example of Mercedes history – one that was almost all original.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1957 - 1962 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing (W194)

1957 - 1962 Mercedes 300SL Gullwing (W194)

There is no technical definition for what makes a car a supercar, and as such, there will always be some disagreement about what car should be considered the first to have reached this status. There is no shortage of possible contenders, but the biggest debate is between the Lamborghini Miura and this, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL.

The 300SL was derived from a race car by the same name, which is noteworthy because it is usually the other way around, with race cars being built out of existing road-going models. It’s usually too difficult to go in the other direction, especially when you’re talking about a car that had overall wins at Le Mans, the Nurburgring and the Carrera Panamericana. But, in the ’50s, road cars and track cars weren’t so divorced from one another that it was impossible.

The idea for a Grand Prix car that was repurposed for road use was pitched to Mercedes by the Austrian-born, but New York-based importer and car dealer Max Hoffman, who would also go on to suggest several successful cars to Porsche. Because of this, the car debuted at the New York Auto Show, a first for a Mercedes product, and was instantly the hit of the show.

Continue reading to learn more about the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing.

Read more
Sir Stirling Moss Driving The Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR: Video

Sir Stirling Moss Driving The Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR: Video

Even for as accomplished a driver as Sir Stirling Moss, the 1955 Mille Miglia was a pretty stunning victory. His winning time of 10 hours, 7 minutes and 48 seconds in a Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR was a full 32 minutes ahead of the second place finisher, the also legendary Juan Manuel Fangio. The record time was never beaten, partly because Mercedes-Benz dropped out of motorsports for a while after 1955, partly because the Mille Miglia stopped after 1957 and partly simply because the combination of 300 SLR and Moss was just so perfect. A relationship which Petrolicious will explore in this video.

The 300 SLR started life as the W196, a full-on race car used for Formula 1 that won the two single championships it entered at the hands of Fangio. Dubbed W196S in this two-seat version, the 300 SLR was made for sports car racing, including the Mille Miglia and the dreaded 1955 Le Mans race that pushed Mercedes-Benz to exit motorsport altogether. Seeing (and hearing) the car being taken out on the roads again is pretty spectacular, especially what with the breathtaking cinematography for which Petrolicious is rightly famous.

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Jay Leno Reviews 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe: Video

Jay Leno Reviews 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe: Video

Even though over six decades have passed since the model was unveiled at the 1954 New York Auto Show, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL still looks the business, with some people considering it the primordial supercar. The latest episode of Jay Leno’s Garage features a Gull-wing, one which actually belongs to Leno himself and is currently in a restoration process. A ’55 model, the red Mercedes-Benz was picked up by the TV personality without an engine or a gearbox, but since then he’s tracked down most of the missing parts, some still available from Mercedes!

Leno was very happy to learn that the classic divison of Mercedes-Benz is still up-to-date with parts for cars that have been long out of production. That’s where he found the ribbed brake drums for the first step of the restoration process. After offering some interesting insights concerning both the model and his Mercedes-Benz memorabilia – including one of Juan Manuel Fangio’s actual F1 championship trophies – Jay Leno went for a drive with the 300 SL. Without a fresh coat of paint but with everything else in working condition, he proceeded to give it the full beans on Californian roads, and I would advise you to pump up the volume for the full experience. This car sound as incredible as it looks! That straight-six will put a smile on your face or I’ll eat this article.

Most people love the gull-wing doors, but I’m more infatuated with the 300 SL’s technology features, including the fuel injection system – a world first – and the aluminum spaceframe chassis that resulted in the peculiar door-opening solution.

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Video: Mercedes 300SL Gullwing going to Bonneville

Video: Mercedes 300SL Gullwing going to Bonneville

Every car addict out there should know that the best way to really enjoy your toy is to push it to its limits. Of course, there are many enthusiasts that prefer to keep their toys in a vacuum-sealed box, and only touch it with soft gloves. This certainly does not describe how Bob Sirna cares for his pride and joy, as he finds great joy in racing his pricey classic Benz on the salt flats of Bonneville.

Over the years we’ve seen plenty of unique cars running the salt flatsat Bonneville, but Bob’s rig it one that no one would expect to see on the flats: a Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing.

Why is this car unusual on the race track? Well, because with a price of over 1 million dollars, the classic 300SL seems to be perfect for a concourse or a museum. not trying to break land-speed records at Speed Week. Still, in the past 12 years, Bob has brought his Gullwing to the salt flats in an effort to break records and cure his "salt fever."

Check out the video to see a guy that lives by the "Enjoy your toys" motto.

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1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Alloy Gullwing

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Alloy Gullwing

The Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing is a rare enough car, as there were only 3,258 examples ever built. Of those, only 1,400 were coupes. So, when you start talking about special edition models, you are getting into some of the rarest cars in the world.

When the SL300 was busy kicking ass at venues like the 24 Hours of Nürburgring and 24 Hours of Le Mans, it was not the standard road-going model that you saw. In fact, the car you saw boasted a completely different body. All of the road-going cars, prior to the car’s retirement from racing boasted a steel body and the racing models featured a lighter allot body.

After the 300SL’s retirement from racing, the alloy body became a 5,000 Deutsche Marks option on the already pricey base 300SL. Because of this massive markup, only 29 models were ever built and sold to the general public, thus making it one of the rarest Mercedes-Benz’s available today.

To read more about the 300SL Alloy Gullwing, click past the jump.

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Mercedes Benz AMG 300SL for Nigo

Mercedes Benz AMG 300SL for Nigo

Okay, we laughed a little when Japanese fashion designer Nigo painted camouflage on a Rolls-Royce Phantom; we were a little offended when he turned one of the very rare Bugatti Veyrons into king of the pink jungle; but his latest fashion mistake has us positively enraged.

Proving that money can’t buy brains or class, Nigo ruined a classic Mercedes 300 SL Gullwing. The atrocity starts with the signature camo paint from his clothing label, but that’s not all. Bad paint can be undone easily, but what will be much harder to atone for will be the removal of the original 3.0-liter inline six engine. Sure the new 6.0-liter AMG V8 engine may be more powerful, but God doesn’t like it when someone messes with perfection.

There are plenty of other “upgrades” including new interior bits and AMG wheels, but we’ll stop listing them because we hate to see enthusiasts cry.

Nigo isn’t the only one to blame. This former classic was built by AMG.

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2010 Mercedes Gullwing

2010 Mercedes Gullwing

Mercedes is planning a new flagship sports car in the shape of a stunning 21st-century Gullwing. It will be placed somwhere between the SL roadster and the Mercedes McLaren SLR supercar and it is believed to become one of the most desirable performance machines on the planet.
The 2010 Gullwing will be developed by Mercedes’ sporting arm, AMG and although it is still in its early stages, one element of the design is paramount - the doors. Bringing back memories of the 1954 300 SL, Mercedes (...)

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