• 2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65

New powertrain, tweaked styling, same top-shelf ambiance

LISTEN 27:56

The S-Class is an old nameplate for Mercedes, dating all the way back to the ‘50s. Back then, Merc called it the Sonderklasse (“Special Class” in its native German), adopting the current “S-Class” badge in the early ‘70s. These days, you can get a variety of S-Class variants, but the quickest of the bunch tout the letters “AMG” on the trunk lid. Tuned by the automaker’s independent performance division, these titans of European motoring offer all the traditional comfort and luxury you’d expect, but add a dollop of furious DTM-themed performance on top, creating one serious slice of automobile as a result. Available in several different body styles, two-door variants include a coupe and a cabriolet, with either the twin-turbo V-8-powered S63 or the twin-turbo V-12-powerd S65 rounding out the powertrain options. Keeping things fresh, Merc just announced updates for the 2018 model year, including tweaked styling and a new V-8 for the S63, once again continuing the tradition established over six decades in the past.

However, this latest refresh brings with it a few questions, the most pressing of which pertains to the S63’s new engine. While the eight gets a displacement downgrade, power is up, challenging the twelve in terms of peak output and straight up trouncing the S65 in terms of acceleration numbers. Which begs the question – why get the S65 when the S63 is arguably the better buy? Read on to find out, plus learn about all the updates for 2018.

Continue to learn more about the Mercedes-AMG S63 and S65.

  • 2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    V8
  • Transmission:
    AMG SPEEDSHIFT MCT 9G
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    612 @ 5500
  • Torque @ RPM:
    664 @ 2750
  • Displacement:
    4.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    3.5 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    155 mph
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:
  • Overall:
    7/10

Exterior

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729548

Per industry refresh tradition, the new AMG S63 and S65 get a few tweaks to the exterior styling, with the biggest difference seen in the front end. Replacing the outgoing model’s bisected mesh intake cover is a series of chromed-out vertical slats, interrupted only by the requisite three-pointed Mercedes star. Merc calls it the Panamericana grille, giving a nod to the front end of such historically significant automobiles as the Carrera Panamericana-winning W194 300 SL.

Additionally, the new AMG two-door gets a revamped front splitter, which Merc says helps reduce overall front end lift. The side intakes also get a redesign with smaller, rounder shapes, as compared to the longer, slimmer intakes seen before. High-gloss black trim is used throughout.

As you can see, though, the look isn’t a major departure from what we’ve seen before:

2015 Mercedes S65 AMG Coupe
- image 729844
2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729631

Note: 2017 Mercedes-AMG S65 Coupe pictured on the left, 2018 Mercedes-AMG S65 Coupe pictured on the right.

Moving to the profile, the S-Class gets updates to the side including revamped side skirts boasting 3D inlays and chrome detailing, plus side view mirrors with a ceramic mirror polishing. In the corners you’ll find a lightweight alloy wheels, with 19-inchers equipped as standard on the S63, and forged 20-inch rollers as standard on the S65. Go for the S65, and your wheels will boast a unique, 16-spoke design, with a variety of alternative designs on the table. Wheel width for the 20-inchers is staggered at 8.5 inches in front and 9.5 inches wide in the rear. There’s also a forged aluminum wheel bolt cover, another nod to Merc’s motorsport career.

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729589
Merc calls it the Panamericana grille, giving a nod to the front end of such historically significant automobiles as the Carrera Panamericana-winning W194 300 SL.

In back, the rear was updated with a new apron and diffuser insert, plus an updated design for the twin tailpipes. The taillights now get an OLED (organic light-emitting diode) lighting element, enabling a unique, curved appearance thanks to thinner film. A total of 33 OLED’s are used per light (66 OLED’s total). The S-Class also gets a “Coming Home” feature, which will activate the various lighting elements when first unlocking the car.

Competing Style

2018 Bentley Continental GT
- image 729850
2014 Rolls Royce Wraith High Resolution Exterior
- image 525856

Note: Bentley Continental GT pictured on the left, Rolls-Royce Wraith pictured on the right.

When it comes to large-and-in-charge European luxury at the top of the pyramid, Bentley is one name that seems to stand above the rest. In this segment, the Continental GT is the nameplate of choice, and as it just so happens, the British automaker has revealed an update that directly challenges the new AMG S-Class. Outside, look for styling reminiscent of the EXP 10 Speed 6 concept, down to the shape of the grille and fascia. LED Matrix lighting illuminates the road ahead, while 21-inch wheels are standard. 22-inch wheels are available, while customers can also choose between 17 different exterior paint options.

Rolls-Rolls is another big name player in this space, with the iconic Wraith taking on the sporting two-door segment. Up front, the Roller’s squared-off features make it instantly recognizable, while the Spirit of Ecstasy takes the traditional spot on top of the hood. The fastback profile, plus-sized wheel fitment, and slick rear-hinged doors complete the look. Complementing the stylish lines is a two-tone paint scheme.

Interior

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Interior
- image 729545

Step into the cabin of the new AMG S-Class, and you’ll find a sumptuous, luxury-laden interior space that’s positively dripping in high-end appointment. We think the layout looks great, while high-end materials like Nappa leather, black piano lacquer trim, and carbon fiber doodads pervade throughout. As you probably expect, there are Mercedes and AMG badges galore, including embossed logos added directly to the upholstery. There’s even an analog clock from IWC, with 3D milled metal hands and metal appliques.

More importantly, drivers will grip a three-spoke Performance-style steering wheel, with a flat bottom, wheel-mounted paddle shifters, and a leather cover. Options include black nappa leather and Dinamica microfiber. Providing the backside coddling are AMG power seats with a memory function and thick side bolsters, plus a seat heating function for those sitting in front.

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Interior
- image 729597
Info like boost pressure, g forces, and tire temperature is offered through the AMG menu, because who wouldn’t want a swath of performance data in a six-figure luxury car?

On the infotainment front, the S-Class gets its own AMG display behind the steering wheel, with a 31.2 cm (12.28-inch) TFT widescreen display. This digital readout provides all the usual info to the diver, including stuff like engine rpm, road speed, and the like. Drivers get a variety of options for the display design, including “Classic,” “Sport,” and “Progressive.” More info is offered through the AMG menu, throwing in critical stuff like engine oil temp, transmission oil temp, lateral and longitudinal g forces, horsepower and torque levels, boost pressure, tire temps, and more. Because after all, who wouldn’t want a swath of performance data in a six-figure luxury car? Sure.

Competing Cabins

2018 Bentley Continental GT
- image 729851
2014 Rolls Royce Wraith High Resolution Interior
- image 495391

Note: Bentley Continental GT pictured on the left, Rolls-Royce Wraith pictured on the right.

One of the most enticing aspects of any Bentley is what you get inside the cabin, and although it’s got tons of performance, the Continental GT doesn’t skimp when it comes to interior appointment. Prominent on the dash is a new infotainment display, which gets a rotating design offering either a 12.3-inch digital readout, a trio of analog gauges, or a clean piece of wood trim. Speaking of trim, expect only the best materials on the market inside this coupe, with leather upholstery, diamond stitching, aluminum bits, and as many as 15 individual color schemes to choose from. 20-way seat adjustability, heating and cooling, and a massage function are included in the seats, while an optional 2,200-watt stereo can be had for extra outlay.

The cabin of the Rolls-Rolls Wraith is also a rather nice place to be, matching the competition in terms of elegance and high-end materials blow for blow. Standout features include the unique Starlight Headliner, which mounts roughly 1,340 fiber optic lamps into the roof, offering a view similar reminiscent of the night sky. An analog clock is mounted in the dash, while the “RR” logo is embroidered into the headrests. All the various toggles and switches are hewn from metal and look fantastic.

Drivetrain

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Drivetrain
- image 729554

Arguably the biggest, most impactful update to the new Mercedes-AMG S-Class is what the S63 is packing under the hood. Both the coupe and cabriolet models come equipped with an AMG-built 4.0-liter V-8 stuffed by a pair of twin-scroll turbochargers. The new 4.0-liter replaces the outgoing 5.5-liter V-8 biturbo powerplant used in the previous model, once again mounting the turbochargers inside the “vee” of the V-8 in a “hot vee” design, sharpening throttle response and lowering the boost spool time as a result.

Although the displacement was decreased, the new 4.0-liter boasts more power than the old 5.5-liter – up to a max of 612 horses between 5,500 and 6,000 rpm, which is a 27-horse increase over the old 5.5-liter. Torque is rated at 900 Nm (664 pound-feet) between 2,750 and 4,500 rpm.

Although the displacement was decreased, the new 4.0-liter boasts more power than the old 5.5-liter, up to a max of 612 horses, a 27-horse increase over the old 5.5-liter

Although power is up, fuel consumption remains relatively conservative thanks to features like cylinder deactivation. Put it in the proper drive mode (“Comfort” mode will suffice, engaging between 1,000 and 3,250 rpm and noted in the instrument cluster), and the V-8 will cut out cylinders two, three, five, and eight, turning it into a gas sipping four-banger.

Mated to the new V-8 is a fresh AMG Speedshift nine-speed transmission and variable all-wheel drive 4Matic+ system. The 0-to-62 mph sprint is done in 3.5 seconds.

Mated to the new V-8 is a fresh AMG Speedshift nine-speed transmission and variable all-wheel drive 4Matic+ system. The nine-speed gearbox is a first for the S63, and arrives with a double clutching feature for faster downshifts, plus a wet clutch rather than a torque converter. There’s also launch control and a “Race Start” feature.

Left-hand drive variants get AWD as standard. With an electro-mechanical clutch between the front and rear axle and a fully variable torque split, the system promises a “seamless” transition between RWD and AWD. Meanwhile, right-hand drive S63 models are RWD only, but do get the same updated 4.0-liter engine and nine-speed transmission as left-hand drive variants.

Critically, the S63 does the 0-to-62 mph sprint in 3.5 seconds. Top speed is electronically limited at 250 km/h (155 mph) but can be bumped to 300 km/h (186 mph) with the optional AMG Driver’s package.

Above the S63 is the range-topping S65 Coupe and Cabriolet, which tosses the V-8 in favor of a twin-turbocharged 6.0-liter V-12. Peak output is rated at a slightly higher 630 horsepower between 4,800 and 5,400 rpm, while the torque curve is fatter at 1,000 Nm (738 pound-feet) between 2,300 and 4,300 rpm. Unlike the V-8, the twelve does without cylinder deactivation and routes power exclusively to the rear wheels. Handling the cog swaps is a seven-speed transmission, with Sport+ mode providing the quickest performance numbers. The sprint from 0 to 62 mph is done in 4.1 seconds, while top speed is once again limited at 250 km/h but can be bumped to 300 km/h with the optional AMG Driver’s package.

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Drivetrain
- image 729615
Above the S63 is the range-topping S65 Coupe and Cabriolet, which tosses the V-8 in favor of a twin-turbocharged 6.0-liter V-12. Peak output is rated at a slightly higher 630 horsepower, while the torque curve is fatter at 738 pound-feet.

Which brings us to the big question – why get the V-12? After all, the V-8 is only slightly less powerful, but boasts a much faster 0-to-62 mph time. The eight is also cleaner and more efficient. So what’s the point?

Well, if you’ve ever heard a V-12, the answer should be pretty obvious. Fire up that AMG-exclusive exhaust system and dip into the loud pedal, then ask yourself – is the soundtrack worth the extra outlay?

Speaking of sound, the AMG Performance exhaust system is standard, offering a controllable, infinitely adjustable flap that will modify the amount of sound you want to hear.

Fire up that AMG-exclusive exhaust system and dip into the loud pedal, then ask yourself – is the soundtrack worth the extra outlay?

Furthermore, if speed is what you’re after, you’ll enjoy the onboard Race Start program. Just press both pedals to the floor, then release the brake, and the computer figures it all out for you. Point and squirt.

Finally, it should be mentioned that fuel consumption ranges between 12 and 9.3 liters per 100 km, while combined CO2 emissions ranges between 279 and 211 grams per km (V-12 at the high end and V-8 at the low end, respectively).

Drivetrain Specifications

Mercedes-AMG S 63 4MATIC+ Mercedes-AMG S 65
Engine 4.0-litre V-8 with direct injection, biturbo forced induction and cylinder deactivation 6.0-litre V-12 with port injection and biturbo forced induction
Displacement 3,982 cc 5.980 cc
Output 612 HP @ 5,500-6,000 RPM 630 HP @ 4,800-5,400 RPM
Peak torque 664 LB-FT @ 2,750-4,500 RPM 738 LB-FT @ 2,300-4,300 RPM
Drive system AMG Performance 4MATIC+ all-wheel drive with fully variable torque distribution (LHD only) Rear-wheel drive
Transmission AMG SPEEDSHIFT MCT 9G AMG SPEEDSHIFT TCT 7G
Fuel consumption combined 9.3 l/100 km 11.9 l/100 km
Combined CO2 emissions 211 g/km 279 g/km
Acceleration 0-100 km/h (62 mph) 3.5 seconds 4.1 seconds
Top speed 155 mph (186 mph with options) 155 mph (186 mph with options)

Competing Drivetrains

Speaking of 12-cylinder powerplants, the Bentley Continental GT has the goods to make the go, packing a twin-turbo 6.0-liter W-12 under that rounded hood. Peak output is rated at 626 horsepower and 664 pound-feet of torque, besting the previous model by a sizable 44 horsepower and 133 pound-feet of torque. Sending the power to the wheels is an eight-speed automatic gearbox. A high-performance AWD system puts the power to the pavement. Acceleration looks like 3.6 seconds to the 60 mph mark, while top speed tops out at 207 mph.

Meanwhile, the Rolls-Rolls Wraith also boasts a 12-cylinder powertrain, rocking as much as 624 horsepower and 590 pound-feet of torque. All that oomph is routed through an eight-speed automatic gearbox sourced from world-renowned transmission producer ZF. Press your foot firmly into the luxurious carpet, and you’ll see 60 mph in roughly 4.4 seconds, while top speed is electronically limited at 155 mph, although, with the governor off, much more is possible.

2018 Bentley Continental GT Rolls Royce Wraith
Engine 6.0-liter twin-turbocharged W-12 6.6-liter turbocharged 12-cylinder
Capacity 6.0 liters 6.6 liters
Horsepower 626 HP @ 6,000 RPM 624 HP @ 5,600 RPM
Torque 664 LB-FT @ 1,350-4,500 RPM 590 LB-FT
Transmission dual-clutch eight-speed automatic eight-speed automatic
0 to 60 mph 3.6 seconds 4.4 seconds
Top Speed 207 mph 155 mph

Suspension And Chassis

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729553

To help it handle like a lithe little sports car and not a overweight shipping container, the AMG’d S-Class utilizes a variety of specialty equipment and settings, including more wheel camber, larger anti-roll bas, and a more rigid subframe mount, all of which promise more sportiness in the corners.

Of course, there’s plenty of technology on board to help the thing turn as well. Starting it off is a 3-stage ESP system, with settings including “On,” “Sport Handling Mode” (more yaw allowed), and “Off.” Further handling refinement can be had with the AMG Dynamic Select system, which offers settings like “Comfort, “Sport,” “Sport+,” and “Individual,” affecting changes to the engine, transmission, suspension steering, and, when equipped, the AWD system. Interestingly, the S63 also gets a “Race” setting, while the S65 gets something called “Curve.”

Put it in “Comfort,” and suspension gets soft, there’s less exhaust noise, cylinder deactivation mode is active (S63 only), and the Glide feature kicks in, disengaging the clutch and transmission between 60 km/h (37 mph) and 160 km/h (99 mph) to decrease parasitic loss, thus enhancing efficiency.

Sport and Sport+ modes sharpen the throttle, tighten the gearshift, and firms up the suspension. Race is pretty much self-explanatory.

Sport and Sport+ modes sharpen the throttle, tighten the gearshift, and firms up the suspension. Race is pretty much self-explanatory. The S65’s Curve mode is interesting though, and bears some clarification. Active between 15 km/h (9 mph) and 180 km/h (112 mph), Curve mode will adjust the suspension in such a way as to tilt the body of the car into a corner up to a maximum of 2.65 degrees, or as Merc describes, “similar to a motorcycle rider,” thus enhancing overall comfort. If the idea of a leaning car body sounds more nausea inducing than comfort enhancing, the system can be deactivated altogether.

Both the S63 and S65 get AMG Ride Control, utilizing adaptive dampers in the suspension and complementing the multiple drive modes with independent settings for rebound and compression. The driver can program the settings as desired, and there’s even a manual shift mode that leaves cog swap operation exclusively to the paddles, if desired.

Both the S63 and S65 get AMG Ride Control, utilizing adaptive dampers in the suspension and complementing the multiple drive modes with independent settings for rebound and compression.

The S65 also gets something Active Ride Control, which will scan the road ahead using an onboard camera and automatically adjust the settings to keep the ride appropriately comfortable, fine-tuning the settings to soak up any aberrations detected.

Ride height can be raised by as much as 40 mm (1.57 inches) to help the S-Class make it across bumps or steeply angled roads and driveways. At high speeds, the ride height is lowered by 15 mm (0.59 inches) for more stable handling.

The steering set-up is a speed-sensitive, electromechanical system with a variable ratio tuned by AMG. AMG also redid the brakes.

The steering set-up is a speed-sensitive, electromechanical system with a variable ratio tuned by AMG. AMG also redid the brakes, mounting 390 mm (15.4-inch) by 36 mm (1.4-inch) composite discs with 6-piston aluminum calipers in front, plus 360 mm (14.2-inch) by 24 mm (0.94-inch) discs and single-piston calipers in the rear. Options include AMG Carbon Ceramic discs, plus the requisite AMG branding on the calipers.

Finally, overall weight is cut thanks to the inclusion of a lithium-ion starter battery, lightweight alloy wheels, and those composite brakes as well.

Competing Suspension And Chassis

2018 Bentley Continental GT High Resolution Exterior
- image 728821
2014 Rolls Royce Wraith
- image 729852

Note: Bentley Continental GT pictured on the left, Rolls-Royce Wraith pictured on the right.

Bentley updated the Continental GT this time around with a new adaptive chassis set-up called the intelligent Dynamic Ride System. Like the Merc, the Bentley’s system was designed to adjust the suspension settings to more adequately soak up aberrant road features, this time using electronic actuators on the anti-roll bars to neutralize unwanted body roll. The Bentley also utilizes an air suspension system that complements the Dynamic Ride System with three-chamber air springs, enhancing overall comfort when you want it, and sharpening the handling when you don’t.

Meanwhile, the Rolls-Rolls Wraith was recently retuned to offer lighter steering and better control in the corners. Indeed, one of the Roller’s greatest strength is it’s supple ride quality, but it still has some pretty healthy sporting chops as well thanks to the multilink suspension front and back, air springs, electronic dampers, and adaptive anti-roll bars.

Prices

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729576
2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729599

Customers with have lots of options on the table when it comes time to customize their S-Class. A variety of packages for both aesthetic upgrades and additional equipment are offered, including the Night package, alternative wheel designs, and the Carbon package. There’s even an AMG Track Pack for enhanced motorsport agility, throwing in data collection to help you clip off a few tenths at the track day. You know, because an enormous luxury coupe or cabriolet really is the ideal track car. Once more around the hairpin, Jeeves, and this time with gusto.

At launch, Merc is offering the exclusive Yellow Night Edition for the S63 Coupe, with availability presented for six months after the initial launch. Painted in either selenite grey magno or night black magno, the special edition gets a yellow trim strip on the side view mirrors, seven-spoke wheels finished in black with a polished lip, yellow calipers on standard ceramic brake discs, a larger front splitter, a high-gloss black spoiler, and AMG racing stripes. The yellow theme continues inside with the AMG sports seats, AMG Performance steering wheel, dash, beltline, door panels, armrests, center console, and floor mats, plus there’s unique badging inside as well.

For now, MSRP for the S63 starts at $164,750 for the Coupe and $176,400 for the Cabriolet. Step up to the S65, and you’re looking at $236,250 for the Coupe and $247,900 for the Cabriolet.

Mercedes has yet to announce official pricing numbers, but we’re not expecting too many changes in that respect. For now, MSRP for the S63 starts at $164,750 for the Coupe and $176,400 for the Cabriolet. Step up to the S65, and you’re looking at $236,250 for the Coupe and $247,900 for the Cabriolet.

Look for the car to make its official debut at the Frankfurt Motor Show later this month.

Competing Prices

2018 Bentley Continental GT High Resolution Exterior
- image 728805
2014 Rolls Royce Wraith Exterior
- image 495405

Note: Bentley Continental GT pictured on the left, Rolls-Royce Wraith pictured on the right.

The Bentley Continental GT starts at $198,500, while the Rolls-Rolls Wraith starts at $315,700.

Read the full review for the 2018 Bentley Continental GT.

Read the full review for the Rolls-Royce Wraith.

Other Options

Audi RS7

2015 - 2016 Audi RS7 High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 554395
2015 - 2016 Audi RS7 High Resolution Exterior
- image 554396

It might have four doors, but don’t be fooled – this is still one heavy dose of German performance. Making the go is a 4.0-liter V-8 force-fed by two turbochargers, blessing this Four Ring sedan with 560 horsepower, 516 pound-feet of torque and a 0-to-62 mph time of 3.9 seconds. Opt into the Dynamics Package and you’ll see as much as 190 mph at the top end. Paired with faultless German refinement in the interior and an MSRP of just $104,900, and this is definitely a worthwhile alternative to the Merc for more budget-strapped individuals.

Read the full review on the Audi RS7.

BMW M6 Series Gran Coupe

2014 BMW M6 GranCoupe High Resolution Exterior
- image 485924
2014 BMW M6 GranCoupe High Resolution Exterior
- image 485919

Like the Mercedes AMG division, Bimmer’s M division has a few trick up its sleeves. If it’s two-door performance with tons of interior space that you’re after, then the M6 Gran Coupe has the goods. The party piece is a twin-turbo 4.4-liter V-8 producing as much as 560 horsepower and 502 pound-feet of torque through a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The 0-to-60 mph sprint is completed in just 4.1 seconds, while top speed is electronically limited at 155 mph. Inside, standout features include a heads-up display, rear-view camera, high-beam assist, lane-change assist, parking assist, and more.

Read the full review on the BMW M6 Series Gran Coupe.

Conclusion

2018 Mercedes-AMG S63-S65 High Resolution Exterior
- image 729610

The S63 and S65 are impressive machines, no doubt about it. This is the segment where Mercedes refinement really shines, offering passengers the chance to sit in the ultimate comfort and luxury. At the same time, the AMG badges mean this thing can unleash a furious blast of motorsport-themed speed and performance when asked, making for one enticing package.

But all those pros don’t come without their own set of cons. The V-12, for example, seems particularly pointless. Yes, the soundtrack is impressive, but are you really gonna pay more than $70 grand extra just for those four additional cylinders, even when the V-8 is nearly as powerful, more efficient, less polluting, and most importantly, much faster?

Of course you will. Because in this segment, $70,000 is a pittance.

Are you really gonna pay $70 grand extra just for those four additional cylinders, even when the V-8 is nearly as powerful, more efficient, less polluting, and most importantly, much faster? Of course you will.

Of course you will. Because in this segment, $70,000 is a pittance, and V-12’s are tasteful.

And that’s the philosophy of a car like this. You can’t really measure it in terms of money – well, okay, you could, but that would be unbecoming of the patrons Mercedes is shooting for. You peasant.

Regardless – this is premium motoring, with nothing but the best on tap, and that’s just how it is.

  • Leave it
    • Still very expensive
    • V-8 is faster, more efficient, less polluting, less expensive – what’s the point of the V-12?
    • What’s the point of track day gear in a car like this?

References

2018 Mercedes S-Class

2018 Mercedes-Benz S-Class High Resolution Exterior
- image 713883

Read our full review on the 2018 Mercedes S-Class.

2018 Mercedes S-Class Coupe

2018 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Coupe High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 729462

Read our full review on the 2018 Mercedes S-Class Coupe.

2018 Mercedes S-Class Cabriolet

2019 Mercedes-Benz S-Class Cabriolet High Resolution Exterior
- image 729452

Read our full review on the 2018 Mercedes S-Class Cabriolet.

Jonathan Lopez
Jonathan Lopez
About the author

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