We pit two of the best muscle cars on the market against one another to see which is red, white and blue, and which is red, white and bruised

The car world is chockfull of heated rivalries, but few burn as brightly as the age-old battle between two of America’s most beloved muscle cars – the Ford Mustang and the Chevrolet Camaro. What started in the mid ‘60s as a high-octane street fight with frequent skirmishes at the drag strip has evolved into one of the most contentious clashes in automotive history, and there’s no sign it’s gonna slow down any time soon.

These days, the fight between the Mustang and Camaro brings the same rear-tire-smoking dance and V-8 soundtrack as it has in the past, but the battle today brings with it a whole lot more than that. The straight-line bragging rights of a quick 0-to-60 mph sprint and quarter-mile ET are as important as ever, but thanks to cutting-edge construction techniques and materials to delete excess weight, as well as advanced suspension systems and tuning, these two monsters are now elevated to the realm of genuine sports cars, packing the goods needed to compete against some of the best performance machines in the world.

And that’s all well and good, but it doesn’t answer the fundamental question – which is better? We took a crack at answering that question in the following comparison review.

Continue reading for the full comparison.

First, A Little Background To Set The Stage

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Exterior
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2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior
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Ford Mustang pictured on the left, Chevrolet Camaro pictured on the right.

Here’s what you should expect with both of these competitors – something big, something bad, lots of red, white and blue, and a thumping V-8 in front driving fat tires in the rear. These are the connotations that have built up over the past half-century of Mustang and Camaro production, the stuff that makes these cars absolute classics in the world of fast four-wheeled machines.

But as I alluded to in the introduction, the modern muscle car is more – it can handle a corner, and handle it well. It’s comfortable to drive in, and gets loads of tech in the cabin. It’s even (deep breath) somewhat economical if you opt for the four-banger in the entry-level model.

And all that is truly shocking to anyone that’s grown accustomed to the back-and-forth tussle that the Mustang and Camaro have sustained over the past several decades. But the times, they are a’changing, and while the basics of the muscle car are still intact, the evolution is obvious.

The modern muscle car is much more than it was before. It can handle a corner, it’s comfortable to drive in, and if you opt for a four-banger under the hood, it’s even somewhat economical.

In this comparison, we’ll be taking a look at the most recent 2018 model year mid-cycle update for the Mustang, now in its sixth generation, as well as the latest iteration of the Camaro, which just so happens to also be in its sixth generation.

Between all the various tuners and performance versions and special limited runs, there’s about a gajillion different iterations of both these competitors out there, so to keep things simple, we’re gonna stick with the core range – that is, we’re gonna start with the base model, then go up to the GT model for the Mustang and the SS model for the Camaro. We’ll compare the styling and aerodynamics, the interior design and comfort/convenience features, the engine and drivetrain, the chassis and handling, and the pricing and options. We’ll also look at some of the more intangible aspects of both models, and from the numbers and info, we hope to come to some sort of conclusion as to which of these is the better car.

Looks, Styling, And Aero

Bold, boisterous, and unapologetically in your face – that’s what a muscle car is supposed to look like. These cars are not for the modest or timid. They announce their presence in a flurry of visual bravado, never failing in their mission to stir the emotions of any and all gearheads within visual range.

But such characteristics are merely the baseline now – the modern muscle car must also offer a bit of aerodynamic trickery to help it stick at speed. As such, let’s take a look at what both these competitors offer in the realms of style and downforce.

Mustang

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Exterior
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In its most recent mid-cycle update, the Ford Mustang received a variety of styling tweaks to give it a fresh new face (Ford likes to call it more “athletic”). It still retains the same classic coupe body style as it always has, with a pumped-up rear end, a cab back-like profile, and a long, muscular hood, but the details are slightly altered compared to the year prior.

Let’s start in the front end, where we find the grille has been reshaped and is now placed lower on the car. The grille still maintains the old model’s trapezoidal shape, but it looks a bit slimmer and more drawn-out than it did before. The same can be said of the lower grille section as well. Higher up, the hood was also reworked, now extending a little lower over bumper, while hood vents where placed forward and get twin styling ridges that lend it all an added bit of muscularity. These changes also help to improve the car’s aerodynamic efficiency.

Complementing this is a reshaped bumper, which gets renewed creases here and there, which are particularly noticeable in the lower sections. The profile looks more or less unchanged, with two deep character ridges, one above and one below, which visually narrow towards the rear to lead the eye towards the wide rear fender flares.

Most notable is a reshaped bumper, which gets renewed creases here and there, and are particularly noticeable in the lower sections.

Move towards the rear, and you’ll find an optional spoiler adorning the trunk lid. This unit stretches across the entirety of the tail section, with the main blade bending at the ends and into the fenders, and there’s a vee-shaped support in the middle. Below the spoiler is a black insert that connects three vertical taillight sections per side. Below this, you’ll find either dual exhaust pipes, as standard on the entry-level EcoBoost’d Mustang, or quad exhaust pipes, as standard on the V-8 Mustang GT.

The overarching idea here was to bring along some of the same recognizable cues as could be found on the original Mustang, but in an exhaustively modernized package. Does it work?

Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Note: Original 1965 Ford Mustang pictured on the left, current 2018 Ford Mustang pictured on the right.

In some ways, yes – the horizontal lines and rectangular nose are present, as is the assertive profile and fastback design. And while it’s definitely a total throwback, the footprints to the modern iteration are still there, although they seem to be hidden under several sandy layers of time.

Part of the move to the 21st century includes new lighting. For the first time ever, the new Mustang is equipped with a huge amount of LED lighting systems, including LEDs for the daytime running light signatures (those three bars you see in each of the headlight housings), the low beams, the turn signals, and the projector high beams, not to mention the triple-slat taillights. Optional equipment includes fog lights, also with LEDs.

For the first time ever, the new Mustang is equipped with a huge amount of LED lighting systems.

In terms of customization, Ford is offering ten exterior paint options for the 2017 model year, including Triple Yellow, Shadow Black, Magnetic grey, Lightning Blue, Race Red, Ruby Red, White Platinum, Ingot Silver, Oxford White, and Grabber Blue. With the recent 2018 update, there are now three new paint colors on offer, including Orange Fury, Royal Crimson, and Kona Blue.

Further exterior personalization can be had with one of 12 distinct wheel design choices, all of which offer lightweight alloy construction.

Exterior dimensions

Wheelbase (Inches) 107.1
Overall Length (Inches) 188.3
Overall Width (Inches) 75.4
Overall height (Inches) 54.3
Front Track (Inches) 62.4
Rear Track (Inches) 65.1

Camaro

2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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When Chevrolet introduced the sixth-generation Camaro back in 2016, the automaker declared there were only two carryover parts included from the preceding fifth-gen – “the rear bowtie emblem and the SS badge.”

The rest of it is new. Outside, we find the dimensions have decreased slightly, making for a leaner, meaner machine. The stance is also lower and wider, facets that are enhanced by a new fascia, a new grille, and a new headlight design. Viewed from the side, we see the Camaro still has that traditional muscle car fastback profile, terminating in a plumped-up rear end. In back you’ll find new taillights, lots of horizontal lines, and dual sets of muscular bulges. The rear spoiler is also unique to the specific trim level. Finally, updates were also done to the traditional red, white, and blue banner pinned to the fenders.

Like the Mustang, the new Chevy Camaro seeks to bring back the old-school design we all know and love, but in a more modern package.

Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Note: Original 1967 Chevrolet Camaro pictured on the left, current sixth-generation Chevrolet Camaro pictured on the right.

Up front, we see the same broad, flat nose as the original, with a squared-off grille that connects both ends of the car in hard 90-degree angles. The fender lines and shoulder line are also quite reminiscent of the original, and add substantial beef to the squat rear end. The shoulder line is also particularly high in the new model, giving it a low-slung appearance that looks ready to launch off the line.

Like the Mustang, the new Chevy Camaro seeks to bring back the old-school design we all know and love, but in a more modern package.

But the look isn’t just for show – Chevy says it crafted the new Camaro’s exterior look to be functional as well, spending as much as 350 hours in the wind tunnel testing various design tweaks. The result is less lift at speed, which helps it remain planted when using all of its available horsepower. The design also offers a reduction in drag, which keeps it efficient and adds a little extra at the top end with the throttle pinned.

A few examples of the Camaro’s newfound aerodynamic chops can be seen in the fascia, where Chevy installed a new air curtain that directs airflow up and around the wheels, reducing turbulence and the associated drag. Also of note is the unique fascia used for the SS model, which includes brake cooling ducts, as well as a hood with functional air vents to help promote engine efficiency and reduce lift.

Starting off the Camaro line is the LT trim level, which throws in standard equipment such as 18-inch wheels made from aluminum, although buyers have the option to get 20-inch aluminum wheels if desired. The LT is also equipped with LED daytime running lights in the main headlight housings (seen as a underscore for the projectors), halogen lighting for the main beam, and a unique grille.

Of course, if you want your Camaro to stand out from the rest, Chevrolet is offering a wide assortment of accessories and styling options to customize it.

Step up to the SS model, and you’ll get 20-inch wheels as standard (also made from aluminum), plus LED daytime running lights, HID headlights, LED taillights, a unique rear spoiler, those previously mentioned hood vents, and a unique grille.

The roof was laser-brazed for a simplified, lightweight design, while also incorporating a “reverse mohawk” style (basically an indent that runs the length of the roof). The rear end looks particularly meaty on this model, and definitely gives it a healthy impression of being a “sports coupe.”

The rear end looks particularly meaty on this model, and definitely gives it a healthy impression of being a “sports coupe.”

Of course, if you want your Camaro to stand out from the rest, Chevrolet is offering a wide assortment of accessories and styling options to customize it. These include 11 different exterior paint options, such as Black, Mosaic Black Metallic, Nightfall Gray Metallic, Arctic Blue, Silver Ice Metallic, Summit White, Bright Yellow, Red Hot, Garnet Red Tintcoat, Hyper Blue Metallic, and Krypton Green. There’s also further trim options in both red and black.

All of the wheels are made from aluminum, and buyers can choose between seven different 20-inch wheel designs. The exterior stripes can be had in five different colors, including Black, Silver, White Pearl, Red, and Blue, and each of these hues can be added to the Camaro’s body in four different places – either as a single hood stripe, a fender hash mark, twin rally stripes along the hood, or a spear stripe in the profile.

There’s also multiple grille designs on offer, as well as a ground effects package that adds a few new wrinkles to bring the two-door a little closer to the pavement, enhancing the visual appeal even further.

Exterior dimensions

Wheelbase (Inches) 110.7
Overall Length (Inches) 188.3
Overall Width (Inches) 74.7
Overall Height (Inches) 53.1
Front Track (Inches) 62.5
Rear Track (Inches) 63.7

The Bottom Line

2018 Ford Mustang Exterior High Resolution
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2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior
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Ford Mustang pictured on the left, Chevrolet Camaro pictured on the right.

Picking between these two cars based on looks alone is a thorny proposition, at best. They both look very much like the aggressive, rowdy tire-shredders they’re supposed to be, reminding me of land-based sharks ready to devour lesser performance machines in a hail of RWD V-8 glory.

Both also recall their predecessor’s styling cues with hints here and there, all while exhibiting the hard angles and creases of a modern automobile.

If you put a gun to my head and told me to pick which was my favorite, I’d probably say the Mustang, but it would be so close, we’re gonna have to call this one a draw.

Result – DRAW

Interior, Comfort, And Convenience

To help nudge these two machines out of the realm of muscle cars and towards the realm of sports cars, the interior space is gonna need to be a bit more than a dungeon. Comfort, technology, and a little style can go a long way here, but it’s also gotta be in harmony with the basics of going fast.

Mustang

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Interior
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Inside the new Mustang, the overall appearance and layout is a bit more retro than what you get with the exterior. The gauges, buttons, and air vents are all rounded, stuffed across the dash amidst shiny surrounds made from polished metal.

On average, Ford sought to upgrade its most famous muscle car to promote a sense of premium look and feel. For example, the three-spoke, multi-function steering wheel uses a nice, grippy soft-touch material and brushed silver inserts, with the iconic running horse emblem proudly set in the center. A heated steering wheel is offered as an available option. The center console comes decked-out in a new hand-sewn wrap with contrast stitching. There are also padded knee bolsters, while the door handles, rings, and bezels all get an aluminum finish.

Inside, the overall appearance and layout is a bit more retro than what you get with the exterior. The gauges, buttons, and air vents are all rounded, stuffed across the dash amidst shiny surrounds made from polished metal.

The seats get nice side bolsters, although they aren’t rigid buckets like you might get on the Ford Focus RS – these sitters are a bit wider and comfier by comparison. With the new mid-cycle refresh comes updated seatback patterns, as well as new color choices. Further details, such as a new Mustang badge added to the instrument panel, plus a redesigned key fob, top it off.

Seating is capped at two up front and two in the back, although the rear seats are best reserved for transporting full-grown adults only in a pinch.

Infotainment was also a major consideration for the new and improved Mustang. Standard spec in this department includes a 4.2-inch color touchscreen mounted in the middle of the center console, while smartphone support via Android Auto and Apple CarPlay is available. Ford is also offering a new digital instrument cluster with copious customization features, making the ‘Stang the first Blue Oval product to come with a 12-inch digital LCD screen.

Infotainment was also a major consideration for the new and improved Mustang.

Personalization for this large screen extends to three individual views, selectable via the Mustang’s various driving modes (also three in total). This screen is also the point of control for settings for the steering and suspension, and even the engine exhaust note (more on the various exhaust settings in a bit). All this customizability can be set via the new Mustang MyMode feature, which gets a selectable memory function.

Full digital instrumentation is actually a pretty big deal on an old-school favorite like the Mustang. In the big push away from analog set-ups, a digital readout definitely brings the ‘Stang ahead and into the 21st century.

Full digital instrumentation is actually a pretty big deal on an old-school favorite like the Mustang.

Speaking of stepping into the modern age, the new Mustang is also the first of its kind to come equipped with a host of cutting-edge driver’s assistance technologies. These include such standards as Pre-Collision Assist with a pedestrian detection feature, a distance alert, a lane-departure warning, a lane-keep assist, adaptive cruise control, and a Driver Alert System.

Finally, the Ford SYNC Connect infotainment platform runs it all. This comes with FordPass, another first for the Mustang. This is essentially an app that you can load onto your smartphone that allows for remote functions like start, lock, unlock, and a vehicle locater.

Interior dimensions

Headroom front/rear (Inches) 37.6/34.8
Legroom front/rear (Inches) 44.5/29
Shoulder room front/rear (Inches) 56.3/52.2
Hip room front/rear (Inches) 54.9/47.4
Cargo volume (cu fe) 13.5

Camaro

2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro Interior
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As you might expect, Chevy also designed the interior of Camaro to reflect a bit of the style from the old-school versions that came before it. However, the Chevy product is definitely leaning more further into the modernized camp, bearing lots of futuristic touches to help it stand out against its pony car rival.

Chevy says the cabin utilizes something known as a “shifter-focused” layout, which is one way of saying there’s a great amount of emphasis placed on being the individual seated behind the steering wheel. Speaking of the steering wheel, the new Camaro gets a three-spoke, multi-function, flat-bottom wheel with grippy leather padding along the rim and handsome contrast stitching. The center section is vaguely reminiscent of the Chevrolet bowtie emblem, while the thumb-length buttons get a brushed metal surround. There’s also a heating function offered, if you happen to live in colder climates.

Chevy says the cabin utilizes something known as a “shifter-focused” layout, which is one way of saying there’s a great amount of emphasis placed on being the individual seated behind the steering wheel.

Moving over to the center console, you’ll find the shifter mounted deep in a brushed metal surround, a material repeated in the steering wheel and door panels. Just ahead of the shifter, there are unique control rings for the HVAC and automatic climate control. In order to cut down on clutter and the number of hard buttons, these rings are used for controlling the temperature and fan speed settings, thus making more room for the shifter and cup holders.

On the infotainment front, the Camaro comes standard with smartphone support through Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. In the center console, you get also get a standard 7.0-inch touchscreen, although an upgraded 8.0-inch unit is offered for a little extra. Behind the steering wheel, underneath the “dual-binnacle-style instrument cluster hood,” the Camaro can also be had with a customizable HD 8.0-inch digital display cluster. This unit offers readouts for vitals like navigation and the all-important performance data, but can be programmed for other purposes as well.

The Camaro comes standard with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. In the center console, you get also get a standard 7.0-inch touchscreen, although an 8.0-inch unit is offered for a little extra.

Further tech features include a MyLink infotainment system, plus a built-in 4G LTE Wi-Fi connection and voice-activated controls. SiriusXM satellite radio is also equipped, and new car buyers get a free 1-year trial subscription to try it out. Options include available wireless phone charging, a Bose premium audio system, and a heads-up display.

The techy-ness can be enhanced ever further via ambient lighting settings. Basically, this feature encompasses something called an Interior Spectrum Lighting system, which offers up to 24 individual colors. These are displayed prominently in the dash, on the door panels, and in the center console, and you can add a bit of theatrics via “car show” mode, which cycles through the various hues for a bit of flash.

Those fortunate enough to get a stint in the hot seat will enjoy a standard 8-way power adjustable set-up. Both front passengers will get to enjoy the available heating and ventilation as well. Like the Mustang, the Camaro’s sitters are relatively comfortable, coming equipped with reasonable side bolsters that look to seek a balance between support and comfort.

Like the Mustang, the Camaro’s sitters are relatively comfortable, coming equipped with reasonable side bolsters that look to seek a balance between support and comfort.

Five individual cabin color combos can be had. For the upholstery, these include cloth in either Black or Gray, or you can upgrade to leather finished in either Black, Grey, Kalahari, Black and Red (a.k.a. Adrenaline Red), or Black and Light Grey (a.k.a. Ceramic White). The kneepads and door trim are also customizable, and can be had in Red, Black Suede, Kalahari, or White.

If you decide to go for the Camaro with a 2.0-liter turbo engine under the hood, you’ll get lots of smooth sailing thanks to active noise cancelation, which essentially plays specific sound waves through the onboard speakers to knock out exterior noises and make for a silent ride. If you prefer to make waves as opposed to canceling them out, opt into the upgraded Bose sound system, which provides a highly controversial “engine sound enhancement” feature, adding a little bit of aural muscle to the four-banger’s song. Of course, you can turn off engine sound enhancement altogether, if desired.

There’s also a dual-mode exhaust feature with an electronically controlled bypass valve, which will route spent gasses past the mufflers when you get on the throttle, thus creating ever greater bark out back.

Meanwhile, the V-6 and V-8 get “mechanical” sound enhancers, versus the digital enhancers used with the turbo four. Basically, these enhance the sound coming from the engine bay via a resonator that works with the induction noise, piping it into the cabin for a little full-throttle entertainment. There’s also a dual-mode exhaust feature with an electronically controlled bypass valve, which will route spent gasses past the mufflers when you get on the throttle, thus creating ever greater bark out back. This is particularly effective when paired with the other settings for “Track” mode, but if you’re just looking to cruise, you can also set it to “Stealth” mode. And anything with “Stealth” mode gets a vote from me.

Interior dimensions

Headroom front/rear (Inches) 38.5/33.5
Legroom front/rear (Inches) 43.9/29.9
Shoulder room front/rear (Inches) 55.0/-
Hip room front/rear (Inches) 54.5/-
Cargo volume (cu ft) 9.1

The Bottom Line

Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Note: Mustang pictured on the left, Camaro pictured on the right.

I’ll be clear – both these models get a good amount of tech goodies in the cabin space, with nice touchscreens and amenities throughout. However, when it comes to look and layout, the Mustang seems to trounce the Camaro handily. The Chevy product is just too bland, with a simplistic design that’s vaguely reminiscent of a GM rental product.

The Ford, on the other hand, offers some very nice retro touches, and definitely gives the impression that you are indeed in a special car. I prefer the Mustang’s steering wheel, shifter, and center console to those of the Camaro, and the rounded gauges looks great with that splash of polished trim.

Throw in widespread reports that the Camaro is extremely difficult to see out of, and the Ford product takes the win in this category. When it comes to comfort, go with the ‘Stang.

Result – Mustang WINS

Engine, Drivetrain, And Speed

It goes without saying that the heart and soul of any muscle car is what’s found under the hood. This is where all the magic happens, the birthplace of the legendary American performance machine. The formula of big power produced up front and sent to the rear is very much alive with both the Ford and Chevy product featured in this comparison, but joining the all-important V-8 powerplants is a lineup of alternatives that seek to produce the same sensations, minus a few cylinders. The question is – can they?

Mustang

2015 Ford Mustang Drivetrain
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Note: 2017 Mustang pictured here.

For the 2018 model year, Ford is offering the Mustang with two individual engine packages, both of which deliver at least 300 horses at the rear axle.

Starting things off is a turbocharged four-cylinder, with displacement coming in at 2.3-liters. This engine was introduced a few years back when the Mustang got a reworked independent rear suspension, and it’s the same aluminum EcoBoost four-banger that the Blue Oval uses with the Focus RS, although it is a bit detuned compared to the lump equipped in the rip-snortin’ RS hatchback rocket ship.

The 2.3-liter is the same aluminum EcoBoost four-banger that the Blue Oval uses with the Focus RS.

Before the 2018 model year refresh, the base-level offering for the Mustang was a 3.7-liter V-6. However, that engine was axed going forward into 2018, and it’s uncertain when (or rather, if) it’ll make a return. We’re gonna guess no, although it’s possible it might get a refurbish if Ford decides to expand the Mustang’s engine lineup for the next generation.

That’s all well and good, but honestly, if you’re gonna get a Mustang, you absolutely must have it with a V-8 thumping away in the nose. This is the big daddy of the lineup, rocking a full 5 liters of displacement in naturally aspirated glory.

This is the big daddy of the lineup, rocking a full 5 liters of displacement in naturally aspirated glory.

For the 2018 changeover, the Mustang’s 5.0-liter V-8 was updated to produce even more output and spin to a higher redline, both changes that reportedly trump any other production Mustang GT that came before it. The extra output comes courtesy of a new dual-fuel high-pressure direct injection system, as well as low-pressure port fuel injection, a first on a Ford V-8 platform. Not only do these features buff the entire power band, including both the low-end torque and high-end power, but they manage to improve the fuel returns as well.

So how about some actual numbers? Well, Ford has yet to divulge exactly how much more power the four- and eight-cylinder make as of this writing, but of course, we can always call upon the power of speculation to temporarily fill the gaps.

Current output levels for the turbo 2.3-liter EcoBoost Mustang are rated at 310 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and 320 pound-feet or torque at 3,000 rpm. The compression ratio is 9.5:1. If Ford wanted to, it could easily crank up the boost to give the four-banger ‘Stang enough juice to rival the Focus RS. However, a more likely scenario is just a dash more heavy breathing from the turbo, and around 325 horsepower – a gain of 15 ponies. Torque levels will likely remain the same, if not slightly more with about 5 pound-feet.

Next, the V-8. At the moment, the 5.0-liter makes 435 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 400 pound-feet of torque at 4,250 rpm. The compression ratio comes in at 11.0:1, while the construction material utilized is aluminum for the block and head. We’re thinking an extra 20 horses for this one would be appropriate, bringing the final output figure to 455 horsepower (check out the Camaro’s specs for our justification on that number). Torque should also see a bump, with roughly 15 extra pound-feet, making for 415 pound-feet in total.

The 5.0-liter currently makes 435 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 400 pound-feet of torque at 4,250 rpm, but we’re thinking an extra 20 horses would be appropriate.

As always, we’ll update these sections when more info becomes available

Moving on to the transmissions, you can get a manual six-speed gearbox with either engine choice, but there are unique iterations offered depending on the number of cylinders equipped. For the 2018 model year, the V-8’s six-speed gets a dual-mass flywheel and a twin-disc clutch, which work together to up the torque capability and make it more efficient.

Joining the standard six-speeder is a brand-new 10-speed automatic transmission. Interestingly, this transmission was co-developed with General Motors, and comes as an available option on both the V-8 and four-cylinder Mustang.

As you might expect, Ford is singing this gearboxes praises, calling it “the best automatic Mustang has ever offered.” It pairs a wide-ratio span with some close individual gear spacing to provide the auto-box ‘Stang with better response and speed.

Joining the standard six-speeder is a brand-new 10-speed automatic transmission. Interestingly, this transmission was co-developed with General Motors, and comes as an available option on both the V-8 and four-cylinder Mustang.

This 10-speed replaces the outgoing six-speed automatic, and offers quicker shifts, sharper response, and much lower friction losses. The new electronic control system will also allow for custom automatic transmission settings, and will even adapt the shift pattern to your particular driving style. Control over the gears is offered thanks to the steering wheel-mounted shift paddles to give you the feeling of a manual – minus the third pedal, of course.

Other interesting features include a line lock and launch control. These are critical components for any drag racer, with the former providing nice smoky burnouts, and the latter making maximum thrust off the line.

Other interesting features include a line lock and launch control. These are critical components for any drag racer.

The Mustang also offers an adjustable exhaust note via a new active valve exhaust system, which is offered as an available option. Supposedly, this feature makes for a “fully variable soundtrack to match the entire acceleration range.”

So then, with all that out of the way, let’s get to the really important stuff – the performance numbers. For now, the 2.3-liter turbo Mustang can rip off a 0-to-60 mph sprint in 5.2 seconds, while hitting the quarter mile in 13.9 seconds at 98 mph, as revealed in a test session that Car & Driver performed back in 2014. Top speed is limited at 149 mph.

Meanwhile, in the same Car & Driver test, the 5.0-liter GT managed 60 mph in 4.5 seconds, while hitting the quarter mile at 13 seconds flat at 113 mph. Top speed is limited at 164 mph.

The 5.0-liter GT manages 60 mph in 4.5 seconds, while hitting the quarter mile at 13 seconds flat at 113 mph.

With a little more juice under the hood, plus revisions to the transmissions, we expect to see a few tenths cut from the respective 0-to-60 mph times, plus a little more in the quarter mile as well. Something like 5 seconds flat to 60 mph and 13.6 seconds in the quarter for the EcoBoost Mustang, plus 4.3 seconds to 60 mph and the quarter in 12.7 seconds for the V-8. The changes won’t be dramatic, but will definitely help in the ongoing war against the Camaro.

EcoBoost Mustang

Engine Type: All-aluminum turbocharged 2.3-liter inline four-cylinder
Drivetrain Layout: Front-engine, RWD
Transmission Type: six-speed manual, six-speed automatic
Horsepower: 310 HP
Torque: 320 LB-FT
0-to-60 mph time: 5.2 seconds
Quarter Mile elapsed time: 13.9 seconds
Quarter mile trap speed: 98 mph
Top speed: 149 mph

Mustang GT

Engine Type: All-aluminum naturally aspirated 5.0-liter V-8
Drivetrain Layout: Front-engine, RWD
Transmission Type: six-speed manual, six-speed automatic
Horsepower: 435 HP
Torque: 400 LB-FT
0-to-60 mph time: 4.5 seconds
Quarter Mile elapsed time: 13.0 seconds
Quarter mile trap speed: 113 mph
Top speed: 164 mph

Note: specs listed are for 2015 model year Mustang. All test figures courtesy of Car & Driver.

Camaro

2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro
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When Chevy rolled out the sixth-generation Camaro in 2016, it brought with it three new engine options, plus two new transmission options, including an automatic and a manual. That makes for six possible powertrain combos total. For the engines, the Camaro can be had with a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder, a 3.6-liter V-6, or a LT1 6.2-liter V-8 in the top-rated SS model.

Let’s start with the entry-level engine – the 2.0-liter turbo. This powerplant creates 275 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque between 3,000 rpm and 4,500 rpm. It also makes upwards of 90 percent of its peak torque at an rpm as low as 2,100 rpm, and it can return upwards of 30 mpg on the highway, making it the most efficient Camaro ever produced. However, just because it’s efficient doesn’t mean it’s slow – fully unleashed, the 2.0-liter can propel the Chevy from 0-to-60 mph in 5.4 seconds when it’s got the manual gearbox onboard. Opt for the automatic and you’ll hit 60 mph in 5.5 seconds. The quarter mile is done in 14.1 seconds at 97 mph, while top speed is around 145 mph.

The 2.0-liter can propel the Chevy from 0-to-60 mph in 5.4 seconds when it’s got the manual gearbox onboard. Go for the V-6 and you’ll get to 60 mph in in 5.1 seconds.

Next up is the 3.6-liter six-cylinder, which comes equipped with direct injection, continuously variable valve timing, and Active Fuel Management. In case you were wondering, Active Fuel Management is essentially a cylinder deactivation feature, which is a first for the Camaro. Stay off the loud pedal, and the engine will automatically cut fuel and spark to two of the cylinders, rendering it a four-banger and yielding all those juicy MPG figures you’d expect from such a configuration.

But of course, you’ll want to know what happens with all hands on deck – hit it hard and you’ll get a total of 335 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 284 pound-feet of torque at 5,300 rpm. And that means the mid-grade Camaro has the highest specific output in its segment for an all-atmosphere V-6, or at least it did when it was first released. All that power makes for 0-to-60 mph in 5.1 seconds with an automatic transmission, or 5.2 seconds with a manual transmission. The quarter mile flashes by at 13.9 seconds at 101 mph, while top speed is around 155 mph.

Now for the important bit – the V-8. Equipped in the hard-hitting SS trim level, the lump is identified as a 6.2-liter LT1 small block with direct fuel injection. It’s the same engine that was first offered on the Corvette Stingray, although Chevy says it replaced or modified around 20 percent of its components prior to bringing it over to the Camaro, including a new tri-Y exhaust manifold.

Standout features include variable valve timing, and if you get yours with an automatic transmission, that crafty Active Fuel Management system as well, which should help to make it relatively fuel-efficient. Get the V-8, and you’ll also be enjoying additional cooling capability with a set of auxiliary radiators, a differential cooler, and a transmission cooler, all of which should help it perform well on the track lap after lap.

Get the V-8, and you’ll also be enjoying additional cooling capability with a set of auxiliary radiators, a differential cooler, and a transmission cooler, all of which should help it perform well on the track lap after lap. Output is rated at 455 horsepower and 455 pound-feet of torque.

And since you’ve been so patient, here’s the good stuff – output is rated at 455 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 455 pound-feet of torque at 4,400 rpm, making the new sixth-gen the most powerful Camaro SS model ever produced. And with all that power comes a whole lot of speed as well – get it with a manual transmission, and you’ll hit 60 mph in 4.3 seconds. Get it with the automatic, and you’ll get there in 4 seconds flat. The quarter mile is done in 12.3 seconds at 116 mph, while top speed clocks in around 165 mph.

As previously stated, all engine options can be had with either a six-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic. Go for an automatic gearbox on either the 2.0-liter or 3.6-liter, and you’ll get the Hydra-Matic 8L45 unit with paddle shift operation. Go for the V-8 and manual six-speed, and you’ll get a little automatic help in the form of an Active Rev Match feature that’ll blip the throttle on downshifts to keep the drivetrain for lurching, a feature that’s particularly important for performance driving when heel-toe isn’t exactly a thing. The eight-speed on the V-8 is also a unique pairing to the engine configuration.

Camaro 1LS / 1LT / 2LT (four-cylinder)

Engine Type: Turbocharged 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder with VVT
Drivetrain Layout: Front-engine, RWD
Transmission Type: six-speed manual, eight-speed automatic (eight-speed automatic not offered on 1LS trim)
Horsepower: 275 HP
Torque: 295 LB-FT
0-to-60 mph time: 5.4 seconds
Quarter Mile elapsed time: 14.1 seconds
Quarter mile trap speed: 97 mph
Top speed: 145 mph

Camaro 1LS / 1LT / 2LT (six-cylinder)

Engine Type: Naturally aspirated 3.6-liter V-6 with VVT
Drivetrain Layout: Front-engine, RWD
Transmission Type: six-speed manual, eight-speed automatic (eight-speed automatic not offered on 1LS trim)
Horsepower: 335 HP
Torque: 284 LB-FT
0-to-60 mph time: 5.1 seconds
Quarter Mile elapsed time: 13.9 seconds
Quarter mile trap speed: 101 mph
Top speed: 155 mph

Camaro 1SS / 2SS (eight-cylinder)

Engine Type: Naturally aspirated 6.2-liter V-8
Drivetrain Layout: Front-engine, RWD
Transmission Type: six-speed manual, eight-speed automatic)
Horsepower: 455 HP
Torque: 455 LB-FT
0-to-60 mph time: 4.0 seconds
Quarter Mile elapsed time: 12.3 seconds
Quarter mile trap speed: 116 mph
Top speed: 165 mph

Note: All test figures courtesy of Car & Driver.”

The Bottom Line

Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Note: Mustang pictured on the left, Camaro pictured on the right.

Unfortunately for the Mustang, this is a place where numbers don’t lie. When it comes to the V-8 models, the Camaro SS brings more in just about every category that counts – more power, more torque, faster to 60 mph, faster down the quarter mile, a higher trap speed, and more top end. And it goes without saying each of these numbers are very, very important in the world of muscle cars.

While you do get a little extra in the speed department if you opt for the more economical EcoBoost Mustang versus the four-cylinder Camaro, it’s not really enough to justify reconsidering the win for the Chevy product in this category. And that’s a pretty big win, I should add.

Result – Camaro WINS

Chassis And Handling

So these machines are fast in a straight line – that much was to be expected. But what happens if you actually use the steering wheel to, you know, turn the car? Traditionally, such action are ill-advised in a muscle car, as they usually end with a lot of body roll, a lot of tire squeal, and a pirouetting tail section. Now, however, Ford and Chevy claim the Mustang and Camaro can go around a corner without swapping ends, or tipping over, or otherwise confounding the driver. Let’s check out why that is.

Mustang

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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Back in 2014, when Ford unleashed the current sixth-generation Mustang, people went bananas over the fact it came with a whole new independent rear suspension. It was an upgrade that brought the pony car out of the dark ages and thrust it back into relevancy for those folks interested in tackling an apex or two, and now, Ford has doubled down on that capability with further suspension upgrades for the 2018 model year.

Starting it off is a new cross-axis joint in the rear suspension, something that helps to make the most of the Mustang’s relatively new independent set-up. Essentially, this set-up adds newfound lateral stiffness to the rear end, a facet complemented by new stabilizer bars for even further stiffness.

The really big news for the 2018 Mustang’s suspension set-up is the new MagneRide shock absorbers.

However, the really big news for the 2018’s suspension set-up is the new MagneRide shock absorbers. In case you were unaware, MagneRide utilizes something called magnetorheological fluid inside the dampers, which is basically iron particles in a synthetic oil, plus an electromagnetic coil. When a magnetic field is applied to the fluid, the viscosity is increased, creating a stiffer setting in the shock. The benefits of this sort of set-up are a wide range of possible settings and near instantaneous adaptation for either more or less damper stiffness. The result is a smoother ride, better handling, and greater tunability.

It’s the same kind of tech you can find on high-end machinery like the Ferrari LaFerrari, Lamborghini Aventador, and Audi R8, and is also used as standard equipment on the Mustang Shelby GT350.

It’s the same kind of tech you can find on high-end machinery like the Ferrari LaFerrari, Lamborghini Aventador, and Audi R8.

Those are some pretty big names to be dropping, but Ford says it’ll offer MagneRide dampers across the range as an available option via the Mustang Performance Package.

Further handling chops come via adjustable steering settings as well.

Camaro

2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior
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One of the greatest enemies to solid handling chops is weight. More weight means the suspension and tires have to work harder to change a car’s direction, which is why you have makes like Lotus creating an entire philosophy out of stripping out every last possible ounce in the pursuit of ever-greater performance levels.

And while Chevy isn’t quite as obsessed as Lotus when it comes to lightness, the Bow Tie is most definitely on track to transforming the Camaro from unwieldy lead sled to nippy handling powerhouse.

To make an evolution as dramatic as that, you have to start deep. Bones deep.

To make an evolution as dramatic as that, you have to start deep. Bones deep. As such, the sixth-generation Camaro was built using GM’s latest Alpha platform architecture.

Originally introduced on the Cadillac ATS for the 2013 model year, Alpha is focused primarily on weight reduction through the use of both high-strength steel and aluminum. The platform is also used on the 2014 Cadillac CTS.

Outside, the Camaro lost a few inches for the exterior dimensions, but the big change is on the scales. Thanks to 70 percent new underpinnings, plus clever computer-aided design, the new Camaro cuts as much as 390 pounds over its predecessor, although the average weight loss is a little closer to 200 pounds. What’s more, the whole shebang is 28 percent more rigid as well.

Helping to keep the weight low is the use of aluminum in the suspension components as well, with the front gaining lots of the alloy. Meanwhile, the rear suspension links, which are made from steel, get “lightening holes” to cut out precious ounces.

The front suspension utilizes a multi-link MacPherson strut set-up, although the geometry is specific to the Camaro. Chevy also managed to utilize a double-pivot design for better feel. In back is a five-link suspension set-up, which was designed to create less squat when accelerating hard at full throttle.

The front suspension utilizes a multi-link MacPherson strut set-up with geometry specific to the Camaro, while in back is a five-link suspension set-up, which was designed to create less squat when accelerating hard at full throttle.

Like the Mustang, one of the biggest headlines is the inclusion of Magnetic Ride Control, a first for the Camaro SS model. This tech was previously only available on the hotter, more track-worthy ZL1 model, but now makes its way to the SS for more accessible high-end handling performance.

The active suspension set-up will automatically adjust up to 1,000 times per second, whether it’s to create even better handling on the track, or a silkier ride on the street. More importantly, Chevy contends that SS models with Magnetic Ride Control will perform even better on the track than the fifth-generation Camaro equipped with a 1LE performance package.

The active suspension set-up will automatically adjust up to 1,000 times per second, whether it’s to create even better handling on the track, or a silkier ride on the street.

The steering utilizes a quick-ration rack with electric power to boost assistance. Get the SS model and you’ll find 2.5 turns from lock to lock.

Chevy went with Brembo for the available brake option on each of the various engines and trim levels, while the SS gets them as standard. These optional stoppers come in a variety of sizes depending on what trim level you go for, starting with the LT, which gets 12.6-inch rotors and four-pot calipers in front, plus 12.4-inch rear rotors and single-pot calipers in the rear. Step up to the SS, and you’ll find 13.6-inch rotors and four-pot calipers in front, plus 13.3-inch rotors and four-pot calipers in the rear.

The SS also offers torque vectoring capabilities for the rear axle, wherein the brakes are called upon to apply a bit of slowness to the inside wheel for slightly nippier handling, as well a Competitive Braking mode for even greater stops.

The SS also offers torque vectoring capabilities for the rear axle, wherein the brakes are called upon to apply a bit of slowness to the inside wheel.

Speaking of the various driving modes, the Camaro comes with a tunable Drive Mode Selector, which lets drivers choose between a variety of individual driving characteristics. This includes four drive modes that cater to specific conditions, such as Snow/Ice, Tour, Sport, and, if you’ve got the SS, a Track mode.

Goodyear provides the rubber. Go for the LT trim level, and the wheels are wrapped in a Goodyear Eagle Sport all-season rubber as standard. Optionally, if you upgrade to 20-inch wheels, the tires included get Eagle G1 Asymmetric all-season run-flats. Finally, if you go for the SS, the tires are even more aggressive with F1 Asymmetric 3 run-flats.

The Bottom Line

Muscle Car Melee – Mustang vs. Camaro
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Note: Mustang pictured on the left, Camaro pictured on the right.

This category is a bit tricky to figure out, given the plethora of performance options both models offer to help them turn better. As such, we’re basing our judgment on what each brings to the table without spending a whole lot more on top of the MSRP.

With that, the Camaro once again looks to pull ahead of its Ford rival. Not only is it a bit lighter, but in a recent test from Car & Driver *** http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/2016-chevrolet-camaro-ss-page-3 *** , the SS managed to out brake, out grip, and simply smash the Mustang in the corners.

“With lower weight, higher power, more gears, and greater grip, the Camaro walked all over the Mustang in our performance testing,” the outlet says. “Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber helps produce a Porsche-like 147-foot stopping distance and lateral grip that flirts with 1.0 G. While it favors understeer in most situations, the Camaro was far more wieldy running through the slalom, pivoting better than the Mustang under acceleration and deceleration.”

We’ll see what the ‘Stang brings when the 2018 model is revealed in full, but for now, Chevy has the lead.

Result – Camaro WINS

Pricing And Options

What do you get for your money, and how much do you gotta spend to get the equipment you’re looking for?

Mustang

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Exterior
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Ford has yet to announce pricing updates for the 2018 model year changeover, but for now we can list the 2017 model specs with the understanding that they could be tweaked going forward. In all, we don’t expect major changes for 2018 – perhaps a few grand here or there.

The 2017 model year Mustang line starts with the V-6 Fastback model, which goes for $25,185 and comes with Ford SYNC infotainment, HID headlights and signature lighting, and a 3.7-liter V-6 engine. As previously stated, the V-6 model will disappear following the 2018 model year update.

Next is the EcoBoost Fastback, starting at $26,195. This model replaces the V-6 with a 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine, while also adding LED fog lights and Active Noise Cancellation in the cabin. The wheels are 18-inchers made from aluminum.

Following this is the EcoBoost Premium Fastback, starting at $31,990. As you might expect, this model is also equipped with a 2.3-liter turbo four-cylinder, but adds nice amenities like heated mirrors, SiriusXM satellite radio, heated and cooled front seats, and the “Pony Projection Lights” feature.

The penultimate model is the GT Fastback, starting at $33,195. This is the least expensive model equipped with the banging 5.0-liter V-8. As a complement, there is a raised blade deck lid spoiler in back, dual “Bright” exhaust tips, and Ford’s Air Extractor hood vents in the nose. This model also comes standard with the electronic line-lock feature – exactly what you need for quarter-mile blasts using the eight-cylinder lump.

Heading the line is the GT Premium Fastback, starting at $37,195. This gets all the good stuff as the regular GT Fastback, plus more niceness like SYNC 3 infotainment, ambient lighting, a nine-speaker premium audio system, and voice-activated navigation.

Possible upgrades include the EcoBoost Performance pack, which throws in a 3.55 limited-slip rear axle, 19-inch aluminum wheels finished in black, summer performance tires, an aluminum instrument panel, an oil pressure and boost gauge, new front springs, bigger brakes, a larger radiator, a spoiler delete, unique chassis and electronic aides tuning, and a larger rear sway bar. Pricing for the package is set at $1,995.

Go for the Mustang GT, and you’ll have the option for the GT Performance pack, which adds 19-inch alloy wheels in black, staggered performance rubber, six-piston Brembo brakes, the same aluminum instrument panel, gauges for oil pressure and vacuum, upgraded front springs, a K-brace, a larger radiator, a spoiler delete, a strut-tower brace, unique chassis tuning, a larger rear sway bar, and a Torsen differential with 3.73 axle ratio. Pricing for the package is set at $2,995.

Further upgrades include the Wheel & Stripe pack ($895), the Interior & Wheel pack ($995), Recaro Cloth Sport seats ($1,595), and a Sport Pedal set ($100 - $130 depending on transmission type).

Look for the new 2018 model to go on sale this coming fall.

2017 Mustang Pricing

V6 Fastback $25,185
EcoBoost Fastback $26,195
EcoBoost Premium Fastback $31,990
GT Fastback $33,195
GT Premium Fastback $37,195

Camaro

2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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Kicking things off in the Camaro camp is the 1LS model, which starts at $26,900 and gets a 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder as standard, or the naturally aspirated 3.6-liter V-6 as an available option. Further standard equipment includes 18-inch alloy wheels, cloth upholstery with an 8-way power adjustable driver’s seat and 6-way power adjustable passenger seat, and a six-speed manual transmission.

Next is the 1LT, starting at $27,595. This model is also equipped with a turbo four-cylinder as standard with the 3.6-liter V-6 as an available option, but it replaces the six-speed manual with an eight-speed automatic gearbox and paddle shifters.

Next is the 2LT for $31,400, once again with a four-cylinder as standard and an available six-cylinder. A six-speed manual transmission is also standard, but the 2LT is a bit nicer in the cabin, offering up heated and ventilated seats with leather upholstery and 8-way power adjustable driver’s seat, plus a six-way power adjustable passenger seat. There’s also dual-zone climate control, a frameless electrochromic ISRV mirror, and a MyLink infotainment system with an 8.0-inch touchscreen display.

Higher up, we get into the SS models, a.k.a., the V-8’s, starting with the 1SS for $37,900. This, of course, replaces the four- and six-cylinders with an all-atmosphere 6.2-liter V-8 making 455 horsepower, while the standard 18-inch wheels are swapped for 20-inch aluminum units wrapped in summer performance fun-flat rubber. The brakes are also upgraded the Brembo discs, while the headlights receive HID lighting elements to complement the LED lighting signatures.

At the top of the line is the 2SS for $42,900, which adds to the 1SS with nicer interior features like heated and ventilated seats covered in leather. Once again, the driver gets 8-way power adjustability and the passenger gets 6-way power adjustability. There’s also dual-climate control, an 8.0-inch color touchscreen, and a premium sound system courtesy of Bose.

Available packages include the RS appearance pack for the LT, which tosses in aesthetic enhancements like 20-inch aluminum wheels finished in grey, HID headlights, LED taillights, a unique grille, and a decklid spoiler for $1,950.

Then there’s the V6 1LE Track Performance pack, which includes a black hood wrap, a black finish for the exterior side view mirrors, a reshaped front intake, aero enhancements like a front splitter and rear blade spoiler, 20-inch aluminum wheels staggered with high-performance tires, a suede-covered flat bottom steering wheel, 4-piston Brembo brakes up front, suspension bits from the Camaro SS, upgraded cooling, a dual-mode exhaust system, and limited-slip differential, all for $4,500.

Further potential upgrades include the Technology pack ($800), Ground Effects pack ($2,250), Performance Enthusiast pack ($2,550), and Winter Protection pack ($475).

2017 Camaro Pricing

Camaro 1LS $26,900
Camaro 1LT $27,595
Camaro 2LT $31,400
Camaro 1SS $37,900
Camaro 2SS $42,900

Conclusion

2018 Ford Mustang High Resolution Exterior
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2016 - 2017 Chevrolet Camaro High Resolution Exterior
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Ford Mustang pictured on the left, Chevrolet Camaro pictured on the right.

Both of these cars come with a long lineage of performance machines, bearing a heavy burden to uphold the performance cred of their respective brands. Without a doubt, both cars accomplish this task with style and poise, and are surefire winners in the minds of any enthusiast branded by either a Blue Oval or a Bowtie.

However, in a head-to-head comparison, it’s the Camaro that comes away looking like the better muscle car.

Sorry Mustang fans, but it’s the Camaro that comes away looking like the better muscle car.

That isn’t to say the Mustang isn’t without its merits. While both offerings are comfortable and well equipped, the Mustang looks like the better option for daily duties, especially the EcoBoost model. Not only does it get the nicer interior, but it’s cheaper as well, which means a little leftover for upgrading the stereo, upholstery, or whatever else suits your fancy. It’s also somewhat efficient, all while looking the part of a high-speed ‘Stang.

But if it’s real speed you’re after, something with a rip-snorting muscle-machine attitude that can talk the talk and walk the walk, plus sports-car like agility and deeply impressive acceleration, the Camaro SS is what you need. Throw on a performance pack, and you’ll be sitting pretty wherever you choose to unleash all 455 horses, be it a drag strip or a road course.

Sure, the Camaro is more expensive, especially with additional speed options on deck. But it’s absolutely worth it if going fast is what you care about. And something tells me you do.

Other Options And Cars Worth Considering

While both the Mustang and the Camaro are fantastic cars, they aren’t the only options out there. Here are four more to consider when looking into this segment.

Dodge Challenger

2015 Dodge Challenger
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2015 Dodge Challenger
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Like the Ford and Chevy product highlighted above, the Dodge Challenger is another modern take on a classic muscle car. It’s got a variety of specs and trim levels to offer the customer, starting with a 3.6-liter V-6 making just over 300 horsepower. Step up to the V-8 and you’ll get 375 ponies, while the Scat Pack tosses in a 6.4-liter Hemi making 485 horsepower. You can even get it with AWD with the GT model. But of course, if you really wanna go crazy, look into the outrageous 707-horse Challenger Hellcat.

Read the full review here.

Dodge Charger

Here’s another option from Dodge, but this one’s a little more user friendly given its sedan body style. Thankfully, it’s still got all the speed you’d expect, starting with a 3.6-liter V-6 and 295 horsepower, and up the 485-horsepower 6.4-liter V-8. And like the Challenger, the Charger can also be had in ludicrously overpowered Hellcat trim, complete with 707 horsepower.

Read the full review here.

Chevrolet SS

2016 Chevrolet SS High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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2016 Chevrolet SS High Resolution Exterior
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Speaking of sedans, the Chevy SS promises the same fun as the Camaro, but in a four-door package. Making it go is 415 horsepower from a 6.2-liter V-8, which hits the rear wheels with enough muscle to propel it to 60 mph in just 4.6 seconds. It’s also got standard magnetic ride handling, plus big Brembo brakes for the stops. Unfortunately, production ended in February, so finding one may be a bit trickier than you’d expect.

Read the full review here.

Nissan 370Z

2011 Nissan 370Z Coupe High Resolution Exterior
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2011 Nissan 370Z Coupe
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Here’s a bit of an outlier for ya – if JDM performance is more your style, then Nissan has a solution in the form of the 370Z coupe. Power is derived from a naturally aspirated 3.7-liter V-6 engine mounted in the nose, which sends 332 horsepower to the rear axle for 60 mph in 5.1 seconds. The Z is more of a grand tourer than a muscle car, but it’s still got the sharp performance attributes needed to hang with these other machines. Go for the Nismo version if you’re craving a bit more on top.

Read the full review here.

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