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Sourcing Parts for Your Classic Nissan is About to Get Easier

Sourcing Parts for Your Classic Nissan is About to Get Easier

And, they’ll be OE parts too

Owning a classic car, regardless of make and model, can be a very rewarding thing. On the flip side, it can also be very frustrating if you happen to need a replacement part that’s not made anymore, or only available in the aftermarket. The latter of which can be pretty hit and miss, as oftentimes aftermarket parts for classic cars are far from OE standards and will either fail early on or potentially lead to damaging your baby. Well, if you own a classic Nissan, things are about to get a little easier, as it has just announced a new “Heritage Parts Program.” This new program will operate as a new division of Nismo and will kick things off by offering a whole host of OE spare parts for the R32 Skyline GT-R. Nissan has said the program will expand to other classic performance models but has yet to elaborate on what models will be next.

This move puts Nissan into a group of elite manufacturers like Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, and even BMW — all of which offer similar programs for their classic cars as well. It’s likely that the next cars added to this program will be the R33 and R34 skyline as well, and hopefully, we’ll see support for models like the Fairlady Z or 300zx, Pulsar GTi-R, and the Primera GT, among others. There’s no word on whether or not this program will be available to those in the U.S., but considering there’s a decent market for older imported skylines here in the U.S. (thanks to U.S. import laws that force us to wait what seems like a lifetime,) I would have to say that at least certain parts offered under this new program will eventually be available here. If not, you can always overnight parts from Japan, right?

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Vintage Datsun Fairlady Travels 30k Miles to Help Owner Rediscover Life

Vintage Datsun Fairlady Travels 30k Miles to Help Owner Rediscover Life


We cover a lot of automotive-related material here at TopSpeed. From the latest and greatest vehicles with promises of fast quarter-mile times, insane 0-to-60 sprints, and the occasional gravel-shredding off-roader, it’s all about the newest and fastest.

But sometimes, you just have to slow down and enjoy the drive — to bask in every last mile of a pure driving experience in a pure sports car. That’s exactly what one man set out to do.

Scott Fisher and his beloved 1967 Datsun Fairlady Roadster are on a meandering mission to travel the United States in a clockwise fashion, while soaking in the experience on the timeless journey. No schedules needed.

Fisher started his epic journey last spring from his home in Las Vegas after selling his manufacturing business that he ran for 16 long years. It has since taken him over 30,000 miles through the American heartland, rolling over local highways and byways, while avoiding major routes and interstates “like the plague.” And it was all done in his beautiful ’67 Fairlady.

“I knew I needed to kinda’ get out, and unwind, and get my mojo back,” the 45-year-old man says. His journey has taken him north through the Pacific Northwest and over through the flyover states. Fisher’s goal was to stay up north during the summer months to avoid the extreme heat and sun exposure. “[It’s] allowed me to keep the top down, maybe 80 percent of the time.”

Click past the jump to keep reading about Scott’s amazing travels

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Video: A Garage Chock-Full with Classic Nissan and Datsun Vehicles

Video: A Garage Chock-Full with Classic Nissan and Datsun Vehicles

Not many Japanese automakers quite have the storied history of Datsun and Nissan. Even the now dominant Honda lineup is little more than a teenager in comparison to Nissan’s worldwide presence. With all of this history comes a lot of heritage, and it is obvious that Nissan and Datsun took and still do take this heritage very seriously, as they have over 400 various Datsun and Nissan vehicles dating back to the 1933 Datsun 12.

Recently, Nissan and Renault CEO, Carlos Ghosn, got to pay this warehouse turned pseudo museum a visit. He didn’t just waltz in and take a quick look at cars, as most of us do when we go to car shows. Nope, he hopped into a nearly 75-year-old, mint condition Datsun 17 Phaeton and went for a spin around the entire facility.

Seeing this warehouse full of classic cars that we rarely get to see is amazing in itself. The fact that Nissan takes special care to make sure these cars remain in impeccable shape truly shows how much Nissan respects its past. We all know that manufacturers hold back special models and keep them in good condition to show them off at later dates, but to see it on this scale and not dealing only with special models is impressive.

Nissan actually houses a staff full former staff and volunteers to keep about 70 percent of these classic imports operating. The warehouse also houses several classic Nissan rally cars and a wide array of Nissan-produced police cars.

The coolest thing about this whole visit is that Nissan filmed it and posted it online for all to see (the video is above). This is extremely unique, given the fact that the general public does not have access to this extravagant collection.

This lack of access may soon change, as former Nissan SVP, Kenichi Sasaki, stated that he hopes to see a Nissan Museum built so the public can enjoy these classic models. Our collective hats go off to Nissan for keeping these cars in this great of condition and allowing us a sneak peek into this restricted warehouse.

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Toy car replica of 1970 Nissan Fairlady Z432 goes for $80,000

Toy car replica of 1970 Nissan Fairlady Z432 goes for $80,000

To be fair, it’s still cheaper than getting the original one but sarcasm aside, this one-of-a-kind replica of the 1970 Nissan Fairlady Z432 is just like any other toy – that is, if you think ‘toys’ are now made from platinum and come with a price tag of $80,000.

Given that Nissan only built 420 of these Z432s from 1969 to 1973, you can understand jeweler Ginza Tanaka’s choice of the Fairlady to commemorate the Japanese toy-car maker’s 40th anniversary seems to be a good choice.

The detailing of the platinum-made Fairlady is incredible and just to emphasize the toy car’s rarity and exclusivity, Tanaka didn’t settle for just any kind of packaging - even the car’s box is made from platinum.

In case you’re interested to have a closer look at this $80,000 toy, it’s going to be on-display at the Hong Kong International Jewelry Show for this whole month of March and will then move to the Osaka Tomica Fair in Japan next month.

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Video: Hakosuka GT-R

Video: Hakosuka GT-R

Back in February of 1969 the Prince Motor Car Company introduced a high performance racing version of their premium Skyline sedan for the streets, introducing the world to the first ever Nissan GT-R. The squared off Japanese super car immediately gained cult status by enthusiasts as the Hakosuka GT-R; hako coming from the word for box and the abbreviation for sukairain which stands for skyline. The Hakosuka GT-R was powered by a 2.0 Liter S20 inline six cylinder engine that produced a total of 160 HP. The cars were stripped of unnecessary equipment to be as light as possible for racing, which helped with the new sports car rack up over 50 race wins by 1972.

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Hakosuka GT-R on e-Bay

Hakosuka GT-R on e-Bay

Back in February of 1969 the Prince Motor Car Company introduced a high performance racing version of their premium Skyline sedan for the streets, introducing the world to the first ever Nissan GT-R. The squared off Japanese super car immediately gained cult status by enthusiasts as the Hakosuka GT-R; hako coming from the word for box and the abbreviation for sukairain which stands for skyline. The Hakosuka GT-R was powered by a 2.0 Liter S20 inline six cylinder engine that produced a total of 160 HP. The cars were stripped of unnecessary equipment to be as light as possible for racing, which helped with the new sports car rack up over 50 race wins by 1972.

As great as the Hakosuka GT-R was, Nissan never saw fit to import any of their flagship sports cars to the U.S. but thanks to the team at Right Hand Drive Japan in Torrance, California we now have the chance to own a piece of Japanese sports car history; sort of. According to the restoration specialists “This is a 1972 Nissan Skyline 2000GT GT-R Clone (it was converted from a 2000GT to a GT-R). This model Skyline is affectionately known by enthusiasts as the Hakosuka... Venerated by Skyline/GT-R and classic Japanese car enthusiasts as the birth of a legend, these vehicles are even very rare in Japan.”

Even though this is not the real McCoy, these Hakosuka Skyline 2000 GT-R clones offer an excellent and affordable alternative to the real thing. After all, owning and operating an authentic Hakosuka GT-R would be so nerve racking you would be hard pressed to take it out of the garage and the classic Japanese race car would be doomed to a life of dark damp days hidden away as opposed to being enjoyed outside for the world to see. Now all you need to do is find an even rarer S20 engine to complete the Hakosuka GT-R experience.

Hakosuka GT-R video after the jump.

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