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2021 Nissan Ariya

2021 Nissan Ariya

Nissan flexes its EV muscle harder with the 2021 Ariya all-electric crossover

In the wake of the success it had with the LEAF EV, Nissan is extending its ambitions in the crossover segment with the futuristic-looking Ariya, an all-electric crossover based on the Ariya prototype shown in 2019 in Tokyo.

As you’d expect, the styling cues flaunted by that Ariya - inside and outside - have a clear correspondent in Japanese tradition. The Ariya is available in 2WD and 4WD guise. Customers can also pick from one of the two available battery packs. We’ll get into more detail below.

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2019 Nissan Note e-Power Nismo S

2019 Nissan Note e-Power Nismo S

Nissan has made the Japan-only Note e-Power Nismo even faster than before, with the new Note e-Power Nismo S. That “S” entails it has some extra power thanks to a boost in its electric output.

The Note e-Power Nismo, as its name suggests, is a Nismo-tuned version of the already existing Note e-Power and the Nismo S is one additional tier above. It features not only a power boost over the regular Note e-Power, but also gets a reinforced chassis as well as a much sportier suspension setup to transform its driving experience.

This extra performance is also mirrored in the way it looks, with new red-accented bumpers and side skirts and obligatory Nismo S badges front and rear - on the sides; the e-Power badge is displayed instead. According to Nissan, the car should provide “exhilarating acceleration,” while at the same time also being quiet and is touted as a new kind of Nismo experience.

In order to avoid confusion - Nissan also sells non-electrified Nismo and Nismo S versions of the Note, alongside the electrified ones. This new model detailed here is the e-Power Nismo S, which is a range extender hybrid.

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2018 Nissan Leaf

2018 Nissan Leaf

Shots Fired: The second-gen EV is coming to take on the Chevy Bolt and Tesla Model 3

The Nissan Leaf came to be in 2010 as the company’s first mass-produced, all-electric passenger car. Built on a bespoke platform based on the familiar Nissan B architecture it uses a synchronous electric motor and a range of battery packs that deliver up to 107 miles per charge. Although it has proven quite popular in several markets around the world, the first-generation Leaf has become rather dated now that GM has launched the Chevrolet Bolt and Opel Ampera-e, while Tesla rolled out the Model 3. Nissan is looking to catch up with the competition with a redesigned model that broke cover ahead of the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show.

With more than 283,000 units sold globally as of September 2017, the Nissan Leaf is still the world’s best-selling affordable, mass-produced electric vehicle. But with the Chevy Bolt and Tesla Model 3 now in the picture, Nissan may have to cope with losing some of that market share. But the Japanese are ready to put up a good fight, as the new Leaf is a significant departure from the first-generation model. Sportier and more appealing to look at, it has a more upscale interior with new technology and a revised drivetrain with significantly more power and better range. Will it have what it takes to compete with the world’s most advanced EVs? Let’s find out below.

Continue reading to find out more about the upcoming Nissan Leaf.

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2013 Nissan Bladeglider Concept

2013 Nissan Bladeglider Concept

The Tokyo Motor Show opens its doors for the public in two weeks time. As we know, Nissan will make an exciting announcement at the show. Yes, it is the Nissan GT-R Nismo that debuts on November 19th, 2013. The company will also disclose the Nurburgring lap time set by the Nismo GT-R. But that’s not all, as Nissan will also showcase the Bladeglider concept.

Along with the concept car, Nissan will also reveal a concept prototype based on the Bladeglider, but toned down for actual production. The production version will have its sights set on attacking rival cars, like the Toyota GT 86 and Subaru BRZ. Andy Palmer- VP at Nissan told Motortrend that the Bladeglider will be the car for the young generation.

The origins of the Bladeglider concept can be traced back to the Nissan ZEOD RC racer, and that’s where the unconventionality begins. The designers of the Bladeglider concept describe it as "an extreme interpretation" of what a car can be. The thought behind the concept is to offer an affordable and appealing sports car to young people, according to Andy Palmer of Nissan.

Click past the jump for more on the Nissan Bladeglider Concept

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2014 Nissan Altima Hybrid

2014 Nissan Altima Hybrid

The new Nissan Altima is enjoying a sales up-swing at the moment following a $580 price cut that took effect May 3 of this year. The cheapest Altima’s are now just below $22,000 up to just above $30,000 for the loaded V-6 SL model. This comes on the back of poor launch sales and critiques of the marshmallow driving characteristics.

The big news for the 2014 Altima is the introduction of an all-new, Nissan-developed hybrid drivetrain option.

From extensive technical previews of the new supercharged 2.5-liter four plus Li-Ion battery packs, Nissan is clearly proud of the system and will also roll it out on the 2014 Pathfinder Hybrid for the first time.

Pre-2011 Ford and Nissan hybrids used technology from the Toyota Prius for the electrified system components including the transmission, power inverter, battery, and charging control unit via a licensing agreement. The Toyota-supplied components were then married to Ford or Nissan platform and engine designs.

As a result, the Altima Hybrid drove a lot like the Prius despite using a more-powerful gasoline engine for primary power. This is set to change with the new 2014 Altima Hybrid. The supercharged four-cylinder should deliver good torque and the use of lithium-ion batteries will mark a first for a mainstream, value-oriented hybrid sedan.

Will one Hybrid be enough to battle the Camry Hybrid, the Plug-in Honda Accord and the two hybrid variants of the Ford Fusion?

Click past the jump for the full review of the new Nissan Altima Hybrid.

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2000 - 2006 Nissan Tino Hybrid

2000 - 2006 Nissan Tino Hybrid

Before the Toyota Prius and Honda Insight opened the green road of hybrid cars, another Japanese model, namely the Nissan Tino, was laying the first inches of pavement. But unlike the Prius and Insight that were built from the ground up as hybrids, the Tino was just a normal passenger car fitted with Nissan’s NEO HYBRID system.

The standard Tino was released in 1998, while the Hybrid arrived two years later in 2000. The vehicle was produced in a limited number of 100 units and was available solely on the Japanese market, being considered by many as only a prototype used to test the public’s reaction to this type of technology.

Compared to its gasoline-engine brother, the Tino Hybrid improved fuel economy by more than twofold, while also cutting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by over 50%.

Hit the jump to read our full review on the Nissan Tino Hybrid.

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