Sign us up if this is what a future electric shooting brake will look like

Italdesign Giugiaro has a habit of using the Geneva Motor Show as a showcase for some of its creations. Some of its past works include the Gea, the Brivido, and the Parcour. This year, the Italian coach builder is coming back to the scene of its greatest triumphs with a new project that once again proves that when it comes to Geneva, Italdesign isn’t pulling any punches. The model is called the GTZero, a conceptual shooting brake electric vehicle that pushes the boundaries of conventional design.

If Italdesign was going for “futuristic” with the GTZero, then consider the final product a job well done. If anything, it’s going to be a hard car to miss at Geneva. The overall design looks sharp and at certain angles, it looks like a million bucks. But it does have one glaring eyesore, something I will dive into after the jump. Its powertrain comes in the form of three electric motors that work in concert to produce an impressive amount of power, at least as far as electric vehicles are concerned.

Italdesign doesn’t usually build the cars it presents in auto shows like Geneva so don’t expect to see the GTZero in production form anytime soon. But for what it’s worth, the concept succeeds in giving us a nice look at what makes for an outstanding electric shooting brake vehicle.

Continue after the jump to read the full review.

Exterior

2016 Italdesign GTZero Concept High Resolution Exterior
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The design of the GTZero perfectly embodies the ideals of creating a modern-day design by using styling cues from past models. Italdesign itself admitted that the concept’s look was derived from a number of models in the past. The long hood and the pitched tail, two of the concept’s most noticeable features, are taken from the 1995 Daewoo Bucrane. Meanwhile, the truncated rear comes from the 1968 Bizzarini Manta, while the active hood flaps were lifted from the 1997 Alfa Romeo Scighera. All of these models are related to one another in the sense that they were all penned by Italdesign Giugiaro. So it’s fitting that the coach builder went to its archives to create a car that draws inspiration from its past works.

The long hood and the pitched tail, two of the concept’s most noticeable features, are taken from the 1995 Daewoo Bucrane

The original styling cues play well with all of the “inspired” design cues. The front end, for instance, is defined by that swooping hood, but the slit-like headlights, large air intakes, and the front spoiler all come together to create a clean and balanced look that has become a trademark for the coach builder. The side profile is just as impressive. The butterfly doors may have been predictable, but the long sweeping roof that suddenly cuts off at the rear gives the car that unmistakable shooting brake look. The concept really is brimming with a masculinity that’s further enhanced by the massive set of 22- and 23-inch, seven-spoke wheels that are wrapped in Pirelli P Zero Nero tires. The window cuts are pretty small, which might make outside visibility a problem, but overall, it’s a small inconvenience for a car that looks like the peg for all future shooting brake models.

Having gushed about the GTZero’s design, I do have one issue with it. The hexagonal rear window doesn’t work for me. I get that it fits with the dimensions of the concept, but it doesn’t jive well with the rest of the body. It takes up too much space at the back to the point that the taillights don’t come in their traditional form anymore. Notice how Italdesign literally worked around the massive window just to fit those lights. The whole thing doesn’t convey the balance that was so striking in the front and sides of the concept.

Still, the GTZero looks incredible and I wouldn’t mind seeing it out on the road in the future.

Interior

2016 Italdesign GTZero Concept High Resolution Interior
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Italdesign doubled down on the futuristic identity of the GTZero by dressing up the interior with no physical controls in it other than the paddle shifters and the parking brake

Italdesign doubled down on the futuristic identity of the GTZero by dressing up the interior with no physical controls in it other than the paddle shifters and the parking brake. Everything else is coursed through a massive OLED touchscreen display that rests diagonally and occupies the entire center console. Even the instrument cluster is completely digital and comprises one of four displays arranged at three different depths showing a variety of useful information like gear, speed, rpm, and navigation data. Two of the other monitors can be found on opposite ends of the dash with the last one occupying the space just above the sliding OLED touchscreen display.

To its credit, the coach builder also didn’t forget its Italian roots in dressing up the cabin with premium leather it commissioned from Italian leather goods company Piquadro. The handcrafted leather was used on the seats and the dashboard, creating a nice contrast with the futuristic center console and the satin aluminum and carbon finishes spread throughout the cabin. Comfort was also a requirement for the interior, something Italdesign addressed by configuring the cabin with four independent seats, two in the front and two in the back. These seats can be controlled electronically to ensure maximum comfort and convenience.

Drivetrain

2016 Italdesign GTZero Concept High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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The GTZero gets its power from three electric motors, two of which can be found on the front axle and one on the rear axle. The configuration is interesting, especially since the concept also comes with an all-wheel drive system and four-wheel steering. In any event, the three electric motors work hand-in-hand to produce a total of 483 horsepower. The two motors on the front are good for a combined 295 ponies with the rear electric motor supplying 188 ponies for good measure. Italdesign says that the three motors have a range of 310 miles to go with a top speed of 155 mph. The latter is electronically limited, but in a perfect world where limiters don’t exist, the GTZero would be much faster. Charging the motors to 80 percent capacity only takes 30 minutes.

Conclusion

2016 Italdesign GTZero Concept High Resolution Exterior Wallpaper quality
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We’ve come to expect a specific standard for Italdesign and its latest creation doesn’t disappoint. The hexagonal rear window is probably the only sore spot to this concept. But other than that weird addition, the GTZero fits into what we want to see from a shooting brake model. I don’t know if we’ll ever get to see it past Geneva, but if any automaker is taking notes on the design evolution of the shooting brake model, the GTZero is the perfect car to study.

  • Leave it
    • * That rear window isn’t cutting it for me
    • * Not headed for production
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