Cars Plymouth Plymouth Superbird

Plymouth Superbird

1970 Plymouth Superbird

1970 Plymouth Superbird
- image 82455
plymonth superbird
  • Plymouth Superbird
  • Year:
    1970-
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    426 Hemi V8
  • Transmission:
    4-speed manual
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    425@5000
  • Torque @ RPM:
    490@4000
  • Displacement:
    6982.1 L
  • 0-60 time:
    4.8 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    200 mph
  • car segment:

The NASCAR special for the regular guy

The Plymouth Superbird is an American automotive legend and icon – both on and off the NASCAR circuit. In 1970, Chrysler needed a car that could compete and win races on high-speed tracks, primarily those over a mile in length known as Superspeedways. Speeds were steadily increasing and Chrysler needed something to cut the air better than the competition.

The previous year, Dodge had built the Charger Daytona – a highly modified version of the Charger that included a nose cone and tall rear wing. The Charger Daytona was in fact the first American car ever designed (or more specifically, modified) in a wind tunnel. The Charger Daytona’s 1969 NASCAR season was successful, having been the first car to break the 200 mph barrier in a race, along with numerous wins including Talladega.

But for the 1970 season, NASCAR changed the rules regarding the required number of production cars that needed to be sold in order for a particular model to race. In fact, the number jumped from 500 cars sold in 1969 to a ratio of one car per every two dealerships. This, along with Plymouth’s attempts to win back Richard Petty who had left the Plymouth team for Ford in 1968, resulted in the Superbird – a modified version of the Road Runner. Petty won eight races in 1970 from within the Superbird, while placing well in several others.

Though Dodge and then Plymouth had successful runs in NASCAR with the Charger Daytona and Superbird, their respective homologation specials were the real success – at least in the big picture. Neither car sold well initially, with reports saying consumers didn’t like the aero packages. There’s even reports of the cars sitting unsold on deal lots for several years.

Nowadays, the cars – especially those with the 426 Hemi – are worth anywhere between $200,000 and $350,000. Only 1,920 examples were built, though legend has it Plymouth made several more. Either way, Superbirds are a rare bird indeed.

Continue reading for the full review

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Latest Plymouth Superbird news and reviews:

Jay Leno Meets a Plymouth Superbird: Video

Jay Leno Meets a Plymouth Superbird: Video

It’s one of only 58 models with a HEMI engine and a four-speed manual transmission

A 1970 Plymouth Superbird is considered a unicorn by today’s standards. What most people don’t know is that this outrageous machine wasn’t a hot pancake back in the day. Dealers struggled to sell them because of how they looked and some even resorted to removing the nose and wing to make them look like a typical Plymouth Road Runner. But the Superbird now holds a special place in the hearts of muscle car collectors, including comedian Jeff Dunham, who happens to own one of just 58 Superbirds with a HEMI engine and a four-speed manual transmission. Of course, a car of this stature, with a celebrity owner to boot, found its way to Jay Leno’s Garage.

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Last Plymouth Superbird Ever Built Sold For $165K

Last Plymouth Superbird Ever Built Sold For $165K

Racing homologation has provided us with some incredible road-going cars over the past five decades. Be it the 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429, the 1986 BMW M3 E30 or the Porsche 911 GT2, homologation cars have brought racing to the streets and given birth to some of the rarest and most sought-after production vehicles the world has seen. In the U.S., NASCAR has also been responsible for a great batch of road racers, but none was as spectacular as the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona and 1970 Plymouth Superbird. The latter was built in less than 2,000 units in 1970, but it has become one of America’s most iconic muscle cars.

Dubbed the "Aero Warrior", the Superbird can now fetch in excess of $300,000 if it comes with the 426 Hemi engine (only 100 units built) and it has been maintained in tip-top shape. The "lesser" Super Commando 440-engined Superbirds sell for significantly less than that, but some of them are known to cost more than a new Porsche 911 Turbo. Such is the case for this Lime Light-painted model that, according to its owner, is the very last one ever built.

The winged muscle car, which comes with complete documentation and registry information and only 57,800 miles on the odo, has just found a new owner on eBay for $165,000. Now that’s a rare bird and likely a future museum piece right there.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1970 Plymouth Superbird being sold for $3 million?

1970 Plymouth Superbird being sold for $3 million?

There are a lot of things you can buy for $3 million dollars. Heck, you can buy an all-new Bugatti Veyron and still have a little under a million tucked under your pillow. Paying $3 million for a car is understandable, given of course, if the car in question warrants such a lavish price tag. A 1970 Plymouth Superbird is not one of them.

Apparently, Brian Chaffee, a resident of Middlefield, Connecticut, disagrees with our sentiment given that he hopes to sell his ’70 Superbird for a cool $3 mil. According to Chaffee, he spent part of three years restoring this car back to its glory days in the ‘70’s when it was racing not just with cars, but with jets taking off.

Granted, the car looks good and it’s got some history attached to it, but $3 million may just be a tad overboard, especially when you discover that this particular Superbird does not come with a Hemi engine – a pretty big deal for a car to have to justify a $3 Million price tag.

Continued after the jump.

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1970 Plymouth Superbird

1970 Plymouth Superbird

The NASCAR special for the regular guy

The Plymouth Superbird is an American automotive legend and icon – both on and off the NASCAR circuit. In 1970, Chrysler needed a car that could compete and win races on high-speed tracks, primarily those over a mile in length known as Superspeedways. Speeds were steadily increasing and Chrysler needed something to cut the air better than the competition.

The previous year, Dodge had built the Charger Daytona – a highly modified version of the Charger that included a nose cone and tall rear wing. The Charger Daytona was in fact the first American car ever designed (or more specifically, modified) in a wind tunnel. The Charger Daytona’s 1969 NASCAR season was successful, having been the first car to break the 200 mph barrier in a race, along with numerous wins including Talladega.

But for the 1970 season, NASCAR changed the rules regarding the required number of production cars that needed to be sold in order for a particular model to race. In fact, the number jumped from 500 cars sold in 1969 to a ratio of one car per every two dealerships. This, along with Plymouth’s attempts to win back Richard Petty who had left the Plymouth team for Ford in 1968, resulted in the Superbird – a modified version of the Road Runner. Petty won eight races in 1970 from within the Superbird, while placing well in several others.

Though Dodge and then Plymouth had successful runs in NASCAR with the Charger Daytona and Superbird, their respective homologation specials were the real success – at least in the big picture. Neither car sold well initially, with reports saying consumers didn’t like the aero packages. There’s even reports of the cars sitting unsold on deal lots for several years.

Nowadays, the cars – especially those with the 426 Hemi – are worth anywhere between $200,000 and $350,000. Only 1,920 examples were built, though legend has it Plymouth made several more. Either way, Superbirds are a rare bird indeed.

Continue reading for the full review

Read more