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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
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  • Porsche 718 Cayman GT4
  • Year:
    2020
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    flat-6
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    414 @ 7600
  • Torque @ RPM:
    309 @ 6800
  • Displacement:
    4.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    4.2 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    188 mph (Est.)
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • size:
  • Purpose:
  • body style:

The most radical Cayman to date breaks cover with more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 is the highest performance version of the 982-generation Cayman. An upgrade to the GT4 model from 2016, the 718 GT4 is the quickest and most potent Cayman ever built. And surprisingly enough, it still features a naturally aspirated flat-six engine, whereas all other Caymans have turbocharged power.

Originally rumored to arrive with an "RS" badge, the beefed-up Cayman carries over with the simpler GT4 nameplate. Unveiled alongside the 718 Boxster Spyder, the new 718 Cayman GT4 is significantly more potent than its predecessor, and it’s the first Cayman to develop more than 400 horsepower. Find out more about that in the review below.

 

Latest Porsche 718 news and reviews:

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

The same flamboyant package with a Porsche motorsport design twist in and out

Porsche’s a big fan of letting the world know about its motorsport roots. After all, the brand’s success on the race track is something that deserves to be put out there, and the same applies to any sort of motorsport-related Porsche anniversary.

Meet the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition, a limited special-edition model that features a motorsport-inspired design and an interior that’s been luxed-up by Porsche’s very own Exclusive Manufaktur to mark the 15th anniversary of the customer and club sport series “Porsche Sports Cup Germany.”

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1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

What you get if you work hard at improving the 550 Spyder

How often do you see an ex-works Porsche race car hit the auction block? It rarely happens and this is one of the few that were sold publicly in recent history. This is a 1960 Porsche 718 RS 60, member of the 718 RS family of open-top sports cars built and raced by Zuffenhausen for half a decade beginning with the RSK in 1957. The RS 60 appeared at a time when sports car manufacturers started realizing that mounting the engine behind the cockpit might be beneficial to the performance of the car after witnessing Jack Brabham muscling his way to the title in F1 in 1959. Porsche was already doing it and had been doing it for years, beginning with the 550 Spyder, a car infamous for having an important part to play in actor James Dean’s death but one that was, more importantly, a successful car in road racing.

The RS 60 Spyder raced everywhere around the world, following the trek of the World Endurance Championship and, along the way, ticking starts at Le Mans, the Nurburgring, and Targa Florio. Only 18 were built in period and the factory kept for its own use a mere four examples and this, according to RM Sotheby’s, was "the only to likely become available". Powered by a four-cam engine - first a 1.6-liter mill and, in 1961, a 2.0-liter one - the car you see in the pictures, chassis #044, doesn’t boast with the most enviable of racing records having retired out of both the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans race and all of the three major races it contested in 1961: the 12 Hours of Sebring, the 1,000-kilometer race at the Nurburgring-Nordschleife and the Targa Florio in Sicily. Having said that, it must be said that the car was fast, taking pole position outright in the Italian road race before being raced extensively by Bob Holbert, father of Porsche legend Al Holbert, an amazing driver in his own right - both behind the wheel of Porsches and, later, Cobras. It is, then, no wonder that chassis #044 sold for over $5.0 million back in mid-August during the Monterey sale. That’s one expensive aluminum Spyder!

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The Next-Gen Porsche 718 Cayman Might be All-Electric - Could This Lead to an Electric Toyota MR2 Spinoff?

The Next-Gen Porsche 718 Cayman Might be All-Electric - Could This Lead to an Electric Toyota MR2 Spinoff?

A Porsche-Toyota partnership is looking more feasible than ever

Thanks to a recent report, we’ve learned that Porsche is considering making the next-gen 718 Cayman an all-electric sports car. In fact, it’s currently the “favored option within the company,” even though a final decision has yet to be made. The heavy brass at Porsche will make that decision within the next 12 months, so the 718 could end up being Porsche’s second all-electric car. This got me to thinking about the news last month that Tetsuya Tada, the Chief Engineer of the Toyota Supra, was very adamant about working with Porsche for its next sports car – the one that would serve as the final piece to the puzzle that is the three brothers, and the car that could revive the MR2 moniker.

Oddly enough, this falls right in line with one of my predictions for potential partnership between Toyota and Porsche. Well, sort of.

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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

The most radical Cayman to date breaks cover with more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 is the highest performance version of the 982-generation Cayman. An upgrade to the GT4 model from 2016, the 718 GT4 is the quickest and most potent Cayman ever built. And surprisingly enough, it still features a naturally aspirated flat-six engine, whereas all other Caymans have turbocharged power.

Originally rumored to arrive with an "RS" badge, the beefed-up Cayman carries over with the simpler GT4 nameplate. Unveiled alongside the 718 Boxster Spyder, the new 718 Cayman GT4 is significantly more potent than its predecessor, and it’s the first Cayman to develop more than 400 horsepower. Find out more about that in the review below.

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2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

The 2020 Boxster Spyder remains naturally aspirated, packs more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder is the range-topping version of the 982-generation Boxster. Based on a sports car introduced in 2016, the 2020 Boxster Spyder is the first to wear a "718" badge. Launched alongside the 718 Cayman GT4, its coupe counterpart, the Boxster Spyder features the largest and most powerful engine ever fitted into Porsche’s entry-level model.

The Boxster Spyder, inspired by the 718 race car from the 1950s, came to life in 2009 and returned for the 2016 model year. For 2019, the Spyder remains a limited-edition model that will probably earn collectible status in the near future. But does it have what it takes to compete with other similar sports cars, especially given its expensive price tag? Let’s find out in the review below.

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Wallpaper of the Day: 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

Wallpaper of the Day: 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

If you are anything like us, then we’re expecting your devices - laptop, phone, or tablet - to feature a cool photo of a car? Why is that? Because in the year 2019, our childhood posters have been transferred to our personal (digital) items, which means your friends will also see it and as far as we’re concerned, you must make an impression. In the wake of Porsche’s big reveal of the track-ready 2020 718 Cayman GT4, we thought a selection of proper wallpapers would make a porscheist’s day. Heck, looking at how rad these shots are, they’ll definitely make everyone’s day, Porsche fan or not. So without further ado, be our guest and download any of these gems you like. We know, making a choice is tougher than you think, right?

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Porsche 718 Spyder Debuts with Flat-Six Engine and Sub-$100K Price

Porsche 718 Spyder Debuts with Flat-Six Engine and Sub-$100K Price

What happened to the turbo flat-four?

It’s been three years since Porsche redesigned the Boxster and we’re finally witnessing the return of the iconic Spyder model. First introduced in 2009 and relaunched in 2015, the Boxster returns wearing the iconic "718" badge, which makes it the first car to wear the full name of its spiritual predecessor, the 718 Spyder of the 1960s. Just like the previous Boxster Spyder, the new sports car features a flat-six engine, as surprising choice given that the current 718 Boxster is a turbo, flat-four-only vehicle.

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The 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 has a new 414 horsepower 4.0-liter boxer-six

The 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 has a new 414 horsepower 4.0-liter boxer-six

The track-focused 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman is here and it’s awesome

Porsche’s press blurbs are usually more about a car’s technical prowess, the engineering behind it, and yet, for the new 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4, the tone is a bit different. The automaker is trying to emphasize the fact that the new GT4 stirs your emotions and that the experience of driving it is joy, most of which is derived from the flat-six engine that powers it..

This is a significant difference to all other models in the 718 lineup, all of which are now powered by new turbocharged four-cylinder horizontally-opposed engines and the consensus is they don’t really sound especially exciting. That’s where this new 718 GT4 comes in as it not only brings back the evocative six-pot soundtrack, but it offers it in a more hardcore, track-focused package that will appeal to real enthusiasts.

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Ranked: The Most Powerful Four-Cylinder Production Cars (and One From 1911)

Ranked: The Most Powerful Four-Cylinder Production Cars (and One From 1911)

Right now, the car world is swamped with turbocharged engines. This means high specific output per liter of capacity, lots of torque, massive horsepower numbers and incredible specs for the cars equipped with such tech. While trying to figure out how to present the most powerful four-cylinder production cars, I thought of listing them by the highest specific output of the engine. Yet, listing five with 350+ horsepower feels more fun. It is quite incredible to see to what lengths the producers are willing to go in order to convince us that turbocharging and four-cylinder engines are just enough for basically anything, including high-end performance. These five cars with four-cylinder engines have so much power they will make you forget about a V-8.

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2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T

2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T

Driving pleasure in its purest form

The 718 Boxster T is the first Porsche, alongside the 718 Cayman T, to sport the "T" badge, which stands for "Touring," after the 911 Carrera T. Unveiled in December 2018, it’s based on the base 718 Boxster but comes with a few extra standard features.

The "T" badge turns the already sporty 718 Boxster into a no-nonsense car that offers driving pleasure in its purest form. Although it’s powered by the company’s base engine for the Boxster and Cayman lineup, it’s equipped with chassis upgrades, the Sport Chrono package, and an infotainment system delete. It’s also a bit more affordable than the regular Boxster, with Porsche claiming you can save up to 10 percent compared to a similarly specced model. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

Update 3/13/2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T from the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. Check them out in the gallery at the bottom of this page!

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2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

A Cayman with more go-fast goodies

Introduced in 2005 as a hardtop coupe iteration of the ever-popular Porsche Boxster roadster, the Cayman gets all the same good stuff as its topless sibling, plus the added rigidity and aggressive looks of a fixed roof. The latest fourth-generation was introduced in 2016, dubbed the 718 after the racer Porsche built in the late ‘50s. Now, Porsche is adding a new GTS iteration for the 2018 model year, and although we’ve seen a Cayman GTS in the past, this is the first time the formula has been applied to the fourth-gen 718. Per usual, the upgrades include a marginal power increase, more standard equipment, blacked-out trim pieces, and high-end interior materials.

Update 02/12/2019: We’ve updated this review with images taken at the Chicago Auto Show. This time around, the 718 Cayman GTS was dressed in a luxurious yellow that will just tickle your soul. Check out our fresh batch of images in the gallery at the bottom of this page!

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2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

Now with a Trackday version for amateur racers!

The Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a track-only version of the 718 Cayman developed for customer use. It replaces GT4 Clubsport that Porsche introduced in 2015 and represents a notable update over the outgoing model. Unlike its predecessor, it’s offered in two distinct versions: Trackday and Competition. The GT4 Clubsport Trackday was built specifically for amateur racing drivers that like to spend weekends at the race track without participating in FIA events. The Competition model features a more complex suspension system, and it’s a direct replacement for the old GT4 Clubsport, as it is eligible for GT4-spec competitions in Europe, North America, and Asia. According to Porsche, the new race car features improved driveability, and it’s capable of quicker lap times.

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The 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is Here and the German Competition Should be Scared

The 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is Here and the German Competition Should be Scared

The new version looks almost identical to the old one, even down to the presentation livery

Porsche’s new Cayman GT4 Clubsport comes with the same 3.8-liter boxer engine that’s capable of 425 horsepower thanks to a new intake manifold and a six-speed PDK dual-clutch gearbox. All of which, by the way, is hidden underneath an aluminum body that’s strikingly similar to the 2015 model, save for a bigger rear wing and a more aggressive splitter up front. Two versions will be available: a track day one and another that’s suited for full-blown competition.

The GT4 category in circuit racing has been burgeoning in the past few years. A decade ago, puny BMW Z4s, Nissan 350Zs or other sports cars with a virtually showroom-stock appearance to them romped away in this category. Now, however, things are vastly different. Huge automakers have put their money where their mouths were and invested in highly-advanced racing cars to race in this revamped category that, while still a step below GT3, is very serious indeed but still friendly enough to cater for gentleman drivers.

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8 Little Known Facts About The 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T and Cayman T

8 Little Known Facts About The 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T and Cayman T

The awesome Porsche 718 made a whole lot better

Widely known as Porsches you can have the most fun with, the 718 Boxster and the 718 Cayman were just updated for 2019. Revealed in red, the 718 Boxster T and the 718 Cayman T feature some added gear never before offered for entry-level cars and at a discount, too. In order to make both of them even better than before, Porsche reached into its bin of wonders and integrated some serious gear into the 718 Ts. Yet, the path to driving fun and saving weight led it to make some serious sacrifices. If you really want the purest possible experience, prepare to drive without navigation and without a radio. That’s how the 718 T is rolling.

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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman T

Extra sporting cred for the Stuttgart bantamweight

While most automakers these days are occupied with searching for new methods of extracting more and more power from their sports coupes, Porsche seems more concerned with something even more elusive - lower weight. As such, the German automaker has given birth to a string of lightness-adding model variants, including the likes of the 911 Carrera T. Now, Porsche is applying a similar performance philosophy to the Cayman. Like its 911 big brother, this fresh two-door takes the name “T” and offer a more driver-focused experience thanks to slightly less heft, a variety of standard performance equipment, and a few new aesthetic upgrades.

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If You Like to Keep it Simple, the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman T or 718 Boxster T Might be for You

If You Like to Keep it Simple, the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman T or 718 Boxster T Might be for You

The no-nonsense T treatment extends beyond the 911 Carrera

A no-nonsense, old-school take on the modern Porsche 911, the Carrera T has been a big hit with enthusiasts. Porsche is now building on the momentum with T-badged versions of the 718 Boxster and Cayman.

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Porsche Runs the New Breed at Monza: Video

Porsche Runs the New Breed at Monza: Video

All of Posche’s race cars together on Italy’s GP track

A micro-Rennsport Reunion took place at Monza over the past weekend when Porsche took a number of their new racing, as well as street cars, and pushed them to their limits on the F1 Grand Prix circuit near Milan.

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Wallpaper of the Day: 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

Wallpaper of the Day: 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

With the fourth-generation of the 718 Cayman coming to life in 2016 it didn’t take long for Porsche to pump out the Cayman GTS with a little extra power, nicer materials, some blacked out trim, and more features as standard equipment. It’s a car that looks fabulous in the garage and it can look fabulous on your desktop as well. So, check out our hand-picked wallpapers below and download one of five — the choice is yours.

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Porsche Says No to All-Electric 911, But Maybe to an All-Electric Porsche 718

Porsche Says No to All-Electric 911, But Maybe to an All-Electric Porsche 718

And, the Plug-in 911 is still a few years out...

Porsche has done as good a job as any automaker in adapting to the times while still keeping its brand identity intact. A good example of that is the upcoming, high-performance plug-in hybrid version of the Porsche 911. We already know that the model is going to happen, but just because the 911 will be offered as a plug-in hybrid, that doesn’t mean Porsche is ready to take it a step further and offer an all-electric version of its most iconic nameplate. A Porsche 911 EV is not happening, though if you cross fingers, an all-electric powertrain could make it eventually find its way to the 718 twins.

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A Porsche with Less Than 2.0-liters of Displacement? Probably Not Going to Happen

A Porsche with Less Than 2.0-liters of Displacement? Probably Not Going to Happen

It’s possible to go that route, but it doesn’t make sense from a business perspective

Porsche’s decision to fit a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine inside the 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster models didn’t sit too well with some of the brand’s most hardcore supporters. Fortunately, they shouldn’t worry about seeing a smaller engine on future models because Porsche has no plans of ever going that route. The German automaker indicated that it could do it if it wanted to, but it’s not considering that option because it doesn’t make sense from a performance point of view.

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The Porsche 718 Twins Come to L.A. with Extra Horsepower and GTS Badges

The Porsche 718 Twins Come to L.A. with Extra Horsepower and GTS Badges

The 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster are more potent than ever before

There are plenty of reasons to love the Porsche 718 Cayman and the 718 Boxster. Their “S” variants pack 350 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque, good enough to get them to run at speeds that approach 180 mph. But in the event that those performance numbers aren’t enough to satisfy your thirst for speed, Porsche has a solution in the new 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster GTS models. The two units made their debuts at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show, and they come packing more power to go along with the three-letter nomenclature that has come to define many Porsche models in the past.

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2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

New turbocharged engine makes it quicker and more fuel efficient

First introduced in 1996 as the company’s entry-level sports car, the Porsche Boxster is now in its third generation, and it just received the GTS treatment with exclusive features and more power. Redesigned to include styling cues from the 911 and 918 Spyder, the third-gen Boxster also received a new, more rigid chassis, revised engine, and a small weight reduction compared to its predecessor. The engine lineup included three flat-six units at first, but this changed in 2016 when a comprehensive facelift replaced them with smaller, turbocharged flat-four powerplants. The update also brought a new name, with the "718" denomination added to the "Boxster" badge as a tribute to Porsche’s iconic race car from the late 1950s. With both the base model and the higher-performance S version already in showrooms, Porsche just expanded the Boxster family with the higher performance GTS version.

Spotted testing in the wild since 2016, the GTS is one of two higher performance versions of the Boxster. While not as aggressive and exclusive as the Spyder, the GTS is indeed a significant upgrade over the Boxster S. Lighter, more powerful, and fitted with extra gear; it gives owner access to more speed and quicker sprint times. When GTS prototypes were first spotted on the road, the first question that came to mind was whether or not the nameplate would also make a switch to turbocharged engines. As it turns out, the naturally aspirated Porsche is slowly dying, and the Boxster GTS also embraced forced induction. How does it compare to the previous model? Find out in the review below.

Updated 2-11-2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS taken at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show. Check them out in the gallery below!

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2018 Porsche 718 GTS Unveiled

2018 Porsche 718 GTS Unveiled

A little extra get-up-and-go for the Stuttgart standard

Porsche just announced new GTS iterations for the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, offering more power, more standard equipment, and blacked-out exterior trim. The star of the show is the mid-mounted, turbocharged, 2.5-liter flat-four engine, which gets a power boost thanks to a new intake plenum and turbo optimization. Peak output now comes 365 horsepower, a 15-horse increase compared to the existing 718 S. Making the cog swaps is a standard six-speed manual, although a seven-speed PDK automatic is also available. Torque is rated at 317 pound-feet if you get the PDK and 309 pound-feet for the manual. Acceleration to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds with the PDK, while top speed is rated at 180 mph.

Helping it corner is a standard mechanical rear-differential lock and Porsche Torque Vectoring. The Sport Chrono Package, Porsche Active Suspension Management, and a sport exhaust are also standard.

Aesthetically, the new GTS models get black 20-inch wheels, as well as a tweaked front fascia, tinted lights, black badges and trim, and black tips for the exhaust. Inside, you get a standard chronometer on the dash, as well as standard sport seating with the GTS logo embroidered into the headrests. Alcantara is the material of choice for the upholstery, and can also be found on the steering wheel, center console, and armrests.

Pricing starts at $79,900 for the Cayman and $81,900 for the Boxster, which is about $26,000 more than the standard models. Order books are open now, with deliveries expected for March of next year.

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Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

For this kind of money you can lease a very nice vehicle... or maybe two

We’ve heard the story before, and for some reason, the idea keeps coming around. So what is it that I’m talking about? Well, I’m talking about car subscription services. And, the latest to jump into the ranks is Porsche with a new program that will let you pay a monthly fee for access to cars like the Porsche 718 Boxer, Cayman S, Macan S and the Cayenne. The monthly fee? Oh, just $2,000. For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars. If you want more, you can level up from the “launch” package to the “accelerate” package for an extra $1,000 – bringing the monthly total to $3,000. With that subscription, you’ll get access to models like Macan GTS, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Panamera 4S, and the Carrera S. Basically, “Launch” gives you the basic, entry-level models while “Accelerate” gives you access to the higher trim levels.

Now, the first thought that really comes to mind is that the price seems quite high, and that wouldn’t necessarily be a wrong thought, but it does include at least some incentives. First off, the subscription includes vehicle tax and registration, insurance, maintenance, and detailing. It’s all based on a mobile phone app, and there is a one-time activation fee of $500 as well. Plus, you’ll have to pass a credit and background check too. Once users receive their first vehicle same day or future vehicle exchanges can be requested via the app. For now, the program is available to those residing in the metro Atlanta area and is made available through a collaboration between Clutch Technologies LLC and Porsche Passport. So, how does this subscription service stack up against purchasing your own Porsche? Well, let’s take a look.

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2017 Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt

2017 Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt

German automaker’s newest Cayman variant gets the attention of a famous Porsche tuner

My colleague, Jonathan Lopez, made a compelling argument on why the Geneva Motor Show is the best annual auto show in the world. I wholeheartedly concur. At the very least, it’s without question the biggest and most attended auto show as automakers from all over the world showcase their latest wares, and in many cases, preview what’s to come. Aftermarket tuners are also heavily involved in Geneva with their new tuning programs and this year’s Geneva is no different with the likes of TechArt bringing with it a new tuning kit for the Porsche 718 Cayman.

As one of the industry’s leading tuners with anything related to Stuttgart’s finest, TechArt’s portfolio of Porsche tuning programs is as good as it gets. It’s worked on just about every iteration and variant of the 911. It also has experience working with the Panamera and Porsche’s two SUVs, the Cayenne and the Macan. Now, the German tuner is setting its sights on the newest member of the Cayman family with an extensive aftermarket upgrade program that tackles all important aspects of the sports car. Exterior upgrades? Check. Interior appointments? Check. Engine update? Check. Chassis and wheels? Check and check.

The result is what you’d expect from a tuner who knows its business like TechArt. Not only was it successful in dramatically altering the 718 Cayman’s appearance, but it also managed to bring more life to the sports car that only a tuner that knows what it’s doing can do.

The 718 Cayman tuning package is all set to make its debut at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. From there, expect the program to become available to eager-beaver owners of the sports coupe who are in the market for some aftermarket loving’ for their brand new Caymans.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt.

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2017 Porsche 718 Cayman

2017 Porsche 718 Cayman

Gains turbo-four power, new name

The mid-engined Porsche Cayman was launched in 2005. Essentially a coupe version of the Boxster, the Cayman has become increasingly popular with customers as a more affordable and balanced proposition to the range-topping 911. The first-generation coupe came with 2.7-, 2.9-, and 3.4-liter, flat-six engines with as many as 321 ponies and 273 pound-feet of torque. A facelifted Cayman was introduced in early 2009, while the redesigned model arrived in showrooms in 2013, this time powered by 275-, 325- and 340-horsepower engines. As we’re moving closer to the 2017 model year, the Germans are preparing a mid-cycle refresh for the still-new Cayman.

As with most Porsche facelifts, the Cayman was originally expected to receive minor exterior and interior changes, as well as a mild output increase. However, the unveiling of the revised Boxster made it clear that the Cayman was in for a more comprehensive update.

Aside from the usual upgrades inside and out, Stuttgart’s entry-level sports car also received a pair of brand-new engines and a name that harkens back to one of the company’s most iconic race cars. Specifically, the Cayman dropped its flat-six engine in favor of turbocharged, flat-four units and will be marketed as the 718 Cayman starting in 2016.

Another premier is that the Cayman now features the same output specs as the Boxster, with the two now set apart only by their body configurations. What’s more, for the first time the Cayman is priced below the roadster, in a similar way to the 911 model. Find out more about that in our review below and have a look at the first official photos of the 718 Cayman, which was unveiled at the 2016 Beijing Auto Show.

Updated 06/03/2016: Porsche announced that the new 718 Cayman just had a successful production launch at the company’s plant in Stuttgart. With the production launch of the new 718 cayman, Porsche hopes to increase production numbers to a total of 240 vehicles per day by August - up from the current 220.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman.

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Five Minutes With Derek Bell And The Porsche 718 RS 60: Video

Five Minutes With Derek Bell And The Porsche 718 RS 60: Video

Petrolicious gives us an uncut look at Derek Bell’s drive around the Targa Florio

Remember that Petrolicious episode that featured legendary British racer Derek Bell driving the 1960 Targa Florio-winning Porsche 718 RS 60 around the famous Italian circuit? Well, it appears Petrolicious hasn’t forgotten that memorable episode because it has just released a video of one of Bell’s drive runs around Targa Florio.

The video is completely uncut and there’s no narration either. It’s just one camera, positioned from the rear of the 718 RS 60 facing Bell’s back as he drives the car around the circuit with the expertise of someone who has three Daytona titles and a couple of World Sportscar Championships in his sparkling resume.

Even though Petrolicious says that no speed records were attempted during this run, it’s clear by the way Bell is driving the 718 RS 60 that he was pushing it to its limits. The throaty roar of the car’s engine is clearly audible and just as it’s exhilarating to listen to that sound, watching Bell’s drive from this specific angle makes it fell like you’re actually in the car and having your hair your blown up by the wind.

As far as weekend videos are concerned, this one is as good as any video you’ll watch. Who knows, you might even be inspired to go on a joyride or two after watching it.

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Derek Bell Drives The Porsche 718 RS 60 Around Targa Florio: Video

Derek Bell Drives The Porsche 718 RS 60 Around Targa Florio: Video

Hands down one of the best episodes of Petrolicious

There are certain episodes of Petrolicious’ incredible web series that just hits you right in the sweet spot. This particular one counts as one of them because it shines the spotlight on the original Porsche 718, the open-cockpit race car that Porsche built from 1957 and 1962. Just as important is the man on the video. For those who don’t know, that is Derek Bell MBE, the iconic British racer who has won the Le Mans 24 hours five times, the Daytona 24 three times, and the World Sportscar Championship twice. That’s quite a resume, huh?

The episode is as much about him as it is the 718, or to be more specific, the 718 RS 60, the same race car that won the Targa Florio back in 1960. And as fate would have it, Bell had never raced in the iconic Italian race track until he got a chance to do it with the 718 RS 60. Truth be told, this is probably one of the most important episodes Petrolicious has ever developed.

Here you have one of the most iconic British racers in history and one of only a few to actually be bestowed with an MBE title for his contributions to British motorsport and here he is driving one of the most successful race cars Porsche has ever created. It’s the kind of episode that gives you goosebumps, knowing the kind of achievements both the driver and the car have had in motor racing lore. The fact that Bell was driving around Targa Florio only adds to the incredible story of this episode.

I could go on and on, or I could just leave it to the episode to steer you through the whole viewing experience. It’s 11 minutes long and if you make it to the end – as you should – you’ll realize why the Porsche 718 is so important to Porsche, or at least important enough to be revived in the guise of the new 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster.

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2017 Porsche 718 Boxster

2017 Porsche 718 Boxster

The Porsche Boxster has received its most comprehensive facelift yet, gaining a new name, a more aggressive design, and turbocharged, flat-four engines.

The 1997-2004 Porsche Boxster was introduced in 1996 as an entry-level, mid-engined sports car. It was Porsche’s first road-going roadster since the 550 Spyder. Although it was received with mild criticism and was seen as a departure from Porsche tradition, the Boxster quickly grew on enthusiasts to become the company’s biggest volume seller until the Cayenne SUV was launched in 2003. Twenty years have passed since its debut and the roadster received the most important facelift of its life.

Much like the new 911 Carrera, the Boxster has ditched its naturally aspirated engine in favor of turbocharged units, as part of Porsche’s new strategy to reduce emissions and improve efficiency. More importantly, the said turbo mills use a different, flat-four configuration instead of the traditional flat-six, making the Boxster the first Porsche sports car to use a four-cylinder in several decades. The facelift also brings a name change to the lineup, with the Boxster to be sold as the 718 Boxster from now on.

Although new to the Boxster, the "718" denomination isn’t new to Porsche. The Germans used the same nameplate for a lightweight sports car built between 1957 and 1962. The fact that Porsche decided to revive the name with the Boxster is no coincidence, as the 718 also used four-cylinder engines. On top of that, the original 718 was quite a successful race car, winning the Targa Florio, European Hill Climb championship, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans (class win), so it’s natural for the automaker to want to exploit its motorsport heritage.

The 718 name will also be used for the Cayman once the coupe gets its update, but until that happens, let’s have a closer look at the revamped Boxster in the review below.

Update: 05/21/2016: We’ve made a new video highlighting the Porsche 718 Boxter. Press "play" to check it out.

Continue reading to find out more about the 2016 Porsche Boxster.

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Autocar Reviews The Porsche 718 Boxster S: Video

Autocar Reviews The Porsche 718 Boxster S: Video

Answering the $68,400 question with a turbo

Earlier this year, when Porsche dropped the official details on the next-gen Boxster (aka the 718), you could almost hear the collective gasps of Stuttgart loyalists. Sure, there was new styling, a retuned suspension, and a revamped interior, but it’s what Porsche mounted under the rear engine cover that got people talking. Replacing the outgoing naturally aspirated flat-six is a new turbo flat-four, a move that’s seen as sacrilege to some. But is boost and two fewer cylinders enough to ruin something as brilliant as the Boxster? Autocar decided to find out in this six-minute video.

Set against the rolling English countryside, Autocar’s chief tester, Matt Prior, starts by leading us through the logic of why a turbo Boxster could draw such ire. Sure, more power and efficiency are both good things, but with a turbo flat-four, the characteristic Porsche wail is altered. Significantly.

Power delivery is a bit delayed as well, although above 3,000 rpm, the response seems adequate. On the other side, the suspension is well sorted, as is the steering and shifting. Overall, much of the old car’s character remains, even with a new noise coming out the exhaust pipe.

Final verdict? Well, you’ll have to hit play to find that out.

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Porsche's GT5 Trademark: What Could It Be?

Porsche’s GT5 Trademark: What Could It Be?

News that Porsche was given a trademark for the GT5 name in May 2015 gave birth to rumors that Weissach might be planning to launch a new high-performance model in the future. The big question here is what Porsche model will get the GT5 badge?

It’s quite the mystery, as the iconic 911 has had the GT3 name for more than a decade, and the Cayman has just received a GT4 version. Moreover, the Boxster, also rumored to get a GT variant, regained its Spyder iteration, which is pretty much a GT4 without a rear wing. Squeezing a Boxster GT4 into the current lineup would be next to impossible. This leaves us with only three existing models that have yet to spawn GT versions, none of which are sports cars. I’m obviously talking about the Panamera sedan and the Cayenne and Macan SUVs.

But do any of these performance family cars really need a GT5 version with a bigger focus on track performance? After all, the Panamera and the Cayenne are already available in GTS specification, while the Macan is likely to get one too.

Could Porsche use this new trademark for a brand-new nameplate or an upcoming four-cylinder version of an already existing car? Obviously, there’s more than just one scenario here. We decided to have a closer look at them and decide which might make better sense for the GT5 trademark. Also, each of the speculative models below come with their very own rendering courtesy of our talented artist.

Continue reading to find out more.

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Stirling Moss' Porsche RS-61 Will Be Auctioned At Goodwood

Stirling Moss’ Porsche RS-61 Will Be Auctioned At Goodwood

It’s not everyday you have the chance to buy a car from a living legend, much less an incredibly rare Porsche race car, but here we are. Built in 1961, this 1-of-14 Porsche 718 RS 61 is being sold on behalf of Sir Stirling Moss at the Bonhams Auctions event at the 2015 Goodwood Festival of Speed in June, where it’s expected to fetch a staggering $3 million.

Sir Stirling has quite a history with the Porsche 718. He shared a 718 RS 60 (the nearly identical predecessor to the RS 61) with Graham Hill at the 1961 Targa Florio, a race won by 718s in 1956, 1959 and 1960. Unfortunately, the car’s transmission failed while leading, just a few miles from the finish line. He teamed up with Hill again in a 718 RS 61 for the Nürburgring 1,000 kilometer race. Amazingly, it snowed during the race (as if the Nürburgring weren’t terrifying enough), but the lightweight Porsche handled well in the abhorrent conditions. The duo almost worked their way into the lead, when, again, it broke.

Despite, his lousy luck with the car, Moss liked the 718 so much that he bought an RS 61, chassis No. 718-070, for himself a few years ago and drove it competitively in historic events, including Le Mans Classic and the Goodwood Festival of Speed. You can do the same if you’re able to find a few million dollars in your couch cushions.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Next-Generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman Will be Renamed 718

Next-Generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman Will be Renamed 718

So Porsche’s plan to develop an entry-level sports car to be called the 718 is dead. Porsche head of R&D Dr. Wolfgang Hatz made that clear to Autocar. But just because the project itself has gone to the scrap heap, that doesn’t mean the “718” nomenclature went with it. A new report from Automobile Magazine is now suggesting that instead of building a completely new entry level-model and call it the 718, Porsche is now planning on using the name on the next-generation Boxster and Cayman models.

Noted auto journalist and Automobile Mag’s European bureau chief Georg Kacher disclosed these new developments, saying that the 718 will be used similar to how Porsche uses the 911 to represent a slew of models that fall under its name. The same thing will be applied in this case for the Boxster and Cayman, giving way to a family of new Porsche Boxster and Cayman models under the 718 name.

According to Kacher, Porsche will still use its new four-cylinder engine for this lineup, specifically in low-range models that are being tapped to make up the entry-level versions of the 718. Likewise, a number of four-cylinders with different displacements will be used on other versions of the 718, including the possibility of a turbocharged 718 that will sit as the range-topper of the entire line.

With the arrival of the four-cylinder engine, it’s likely that Porsche will have no place for the six-cylinder engines that the Boxster and Cayman currently use.

So basically, the 718 is still alive, albeit packaged in a different way than Porsche originally intended. The first derivative of this new line could arrive in 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about the next-generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman.

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Porsche Officially Scraps 718 "Baby Boxster" Plan

Porsche Officially Scraps 718 "Baby Boxster" Plan

Despite having had a gestation period of at least three years, during which the project never actually made it past the drawing board, the plan for a new entry-level model in the Porsche lineup has been apparently been put not on the backburner but canceled altogether. The information comes straight from the head of R&D at Porsche, Dr. Wolfgang Hatz, who confirmed the somewhat sad news to the folks at Autocar.

"The project is stopped. We have a very good entry point to the range with the Boxster, and we see no reason to go below that. Porsche should remain exclusive, and you cannot chase volume when you are such a brand. The Boxster is our perfect entry point - we have already set the right entry level." Hatz told Autocar.

Expected to slot beneath the Boxster in the Porsche lineup, the model had been rumored to wear the 718 moniker as a nod to the company’s mid-engine racing car from the late 1950s and early 1960s, which at the time was a very successful racing development of the famous 550 Spyder. Part of a project that would have unified the R&D programs of both Porsche and Volkswagen even more, the model would have been based on an all-new aluminum-intensive architecture with a mid-engine layout.

At Ingolstadt’s end of the deal, the Porsche 718 would have gotten the rumored Audi R4 as both a platform mate and a competitor, which is probably one of the reasons why the project’s business case didn’t exactly add up in the end. As some of you know, the Audi R4 is now also stillborn.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 718.

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Porsche Says 718 Won't Happen

Porsche Says 718 Won’t Happen

If you were hoping the rumors that Porsche was going to build the 718, a car smaller and cheaper than the current Boxster were true, I am about to break your heart. During the Paris Motor Show, Automotive News caught up with the CEO of Porsche North America, Detlev von Platen, to discuss the future of Porsche and he quickly shot down the idea. "You won’t see anything lower than the current Boxster model," he said. "We had many discussions about this in the group, and the decision was made that the time is not right."

It comes down to deciding what makes a proper “entry-level” car for the brand. If you take the label too far down the pricing range, you risk sacrificing brand cache that brings buyers into the higher tiers. According to von Platen, "Our entry model is our pre-owned program." So if you want a cheaper Porsche, go buy an old one.

Von Platen may have been forward with information regarding the small cheaper “718”, but remained exceedingly tight-lipped when it came to questions regarding the potential Ferrari-competitor “988” and the smaller "Pajun" sedan. Considering there was no out-right refusal about these new models, coupled with the unsurpassed demand for the new Macan, Porsche has plenty of resources to create a few new cars for the portfolio.

As always, keep it locked here on TopSpeed.com for the details on any of these new models as soon as we get them.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche’s rumored 718.

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TopSpeed Podcast Episode 013 - "Audi, Porsche and Nissan, Oh My!"

TopSpeed Podcast Episode 013 - "Audi, Porsche and Nissan, Oh My!"

Ladies and Gentleman, it is Thursday, and that means it is time for Justin, Mark, and myself to fill your ears with banter about the automotive universe.

It is time for the TopSpeed Podcast. No video this week folks, sorry, but we are working on getting a live show setup soon! That means you can see us and chat with us all in rel time. We hope to have it ready by next week.

We start the show in the usual fashion with Weekly Wheels. Justin has been driving the Mazda6, I spent some time with Nissan Juke Nismo, and Mark blasted around in the supercharged Audi S5.

For the news this week, we talk about Nissan’s love of fun cars, the Audi S7, and the changes coming to the 2015 Corvette Stingray.

We keep the horsepower high with talk about our exclusive image of some of the Challenger Hellcat’s cooling equipment, and we speculate on the upcoming small Porsche 718.

We conclude the news with a quick talk about my recent time with Grid Autosport.

Our Q/A segment features some talk of F1 cars, and we finish the show with Own, Drive Burn. This week we have a trio of the greatest supercars of all time. This one was far from easy.

As always, you can find us on iTunes. Feel free to rate, review and subscribe, it makes us all very happy. If you prefer the Twitter thing, you can find us @TopSpeedPodcast, and you can always reach us be email at Podcast@TopSpeed.com. Of course, we love the comments and enjoy chatting with you.

See you fine people next Thursday.

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2016 Porsche 718

2016 Porsche 718

Note: Porsche 550 rendered here.

The rumors about Porsche’s baby-Boxster roadster are swirling up again with new reports coming out of Germany. This time, the news suggests the new car will surface for the 2016 model year and sport two versions of a flat-four engine. Dubbed the 718, this rumored roadster will slot under the Boxster in terms of price, horsepower, and weight, while still offering plenty of go-fast performance for buyers looking to spend less than the Boxster’s $63,000 asking price.

The report from Focus pins the 718’s two four-cylinders as displacing 2.0- and 2.5-liters with horsepower outputs of 282 and 355, respectively. Porsche will combine these engines with a DSG gearbox and manual transmissions that will drive the rear wheels. The combination of a lighter, mid-mounted, four-cylinder engine and a lighter chassis means the 718 will surely be a hot performer.

Rumors also claim that Porsche engineers are using a modified Boxster platform with a reduction in mass coming from extensive uses of aluminum. It wouldn’t be surprising to see the new Roadster also use lots of carbon fiber, as the cost of CF production keeps falling and becomes more pervasive in the industry.

Though the official word isn’t out yet, experts say the car will cost roughly $53,000 — a solid $10K less than the base Boxster. That said, the 718’s upper trim level, which includes the 355-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder, will probably only undercut the Boxster by a few thousand. Either way, we appear to be getting a more pure drop-top from Stuttgart by 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 718.

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