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2021 Porsche 993 Speedster Remastered by Gunther Werks Debuts At The 2021 Monterey Car Week

2021 Porsche 993 Speedster Remastered by Gunther Werks Debuts At The 2021 Monterey Car Week

Limited to just 25 examples, find out why this bespoke creation could cost upwards of half a million dollars

The American Porsche tuning specialist, Gunther Werks unveiled the 2021 version of the Porsche 993 Speedster Remastered at Monterey Car Week in California. The firm, in fact, showed off the 993 Speedster earlier this year.

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This 1996 Porsche 993 911 Turbo Gemballa GTR 600 Redefines Bespoke Design

This 1996 Porsche 993 911 Turbo Gemballa GTR 600 Redefines Bespoke Design

It took two tuning phases to bring this 911 to its current state

Gemballa didn’t make a name for itself with tame builds. Everything that comes out of the Porsche-centric tuner’s workshops is fast, powerful, and loud. And we’re not even talking about exhaust sounds. Just check out this Gemballa GTR 600.

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2021 Porsche 993 Speedster by Gunther Werks

2021 Porsche 993 Speedster by Gunther Werks

It doesn’t have a roof and it’s more powerful than the first 993 Remastered Porsche 911

Gunther Werks’ remastered 993-generation Porsche 911 now has a drop-top sibling. The new model, called the 993 Speedster Remastered, is the latest bespoke creation from the California-based tuning firm. It’s more powerful than its coupe counterpart, and with the roof get lopped off, it also looks like a true speedster. Only 25 units of the 993 Speedster Remastered will be built. There’s no word yet on pricing, but with the coupe version fetching $565,000, expect the speedster to carry a price that’s closer to $600,000.

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Watch the Gunther Werks "Remastered 993" Porsche 911 Lap Laguna Seca in 1:30.99

Watch the Gunther Werks "Remastered 993" Porsche 911 Lap Laguna Seca in 1:30.99

The Gunther Werks 993 is the ultimate air-cooled Porsche 911!

1998 was a big year for the Porsche 911. That’s when the German company introduced the 996. The first major redesigned since the 911 came to life in the 1960s, the 996 also marked the end of the air-cooled era, as the popular engine was replaced by a water-cooled flat-six. The switch was controversial and many purists considered it to be the end of the true 911. If you like air-cooled power, you can still find older 911s on the market. But what if you also want the modern technology that did not exist back in the 1990s? Well, Gunther Werks will give you the best of both worlds through its remastered 993. And you can check out how fast and dynamic it is on this footage from Laguna Seca.

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Check Out This Awesome Review of a Street-Legal Gunther Werks 993 Porsche 911

Check Out This Awesome Review of a Street-Legal Gunther Werks 993 Porsche 911

This modified Porsche 993 will make you forget about the modern GT3 RS

Because the Porsche 911 is a very popular car, the market is now packed with tuners that modify the German sports car. Among them, there are a few shops that do older 911s. Gunther Werks is one of them, and its reinterpretation of the 993-generation 911 is impressive, to say the least. And it’s not just a beefed-up 911, but a full-fledged race car that’s road legal.

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Meet the Guntherwerks 400R - a 25-Year-Old Porsche 911 That's Faster Than Today's GT3!

Meet the Guntherwerks 400R - a 25-Year-Old Porsche 911 That’s Faster Than Today’s GT3!

This is the best of all the worlds!

Are you bored of resto-modded Porsches? Good, because neither are we and since we’re talking old Porsches that are made to beat whatever Stuttgart’s got on its production lines right now, let’s take a look at the Guntherwerks 400R, namely the production version of a car we first heard about back in 2018.

It’s been improved in many areas since then and now Guntherwerks is ready to begin making this half-a-million-dollar 993 on steroids. You can still probably get one but you gotta act quick - they’ll only be making 25 400Rs.

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This Rendering of a 993-Gen Porsche 911 Safari Will Make You Question Your Automotive Beliefs

This Rendering of a 993-Gen Porsche 911 Safari Will Make You Question Your Automotive Beliefs

We know you like it in secret

Old Porsche 911s turned rally cars are not a novelty. We’ve seen a couple of them over the years and all we can say is that our garages wouldn’t mind one. Actually, Porsche built such contraptions in the early 1970s, after it got out of racing in the WRC, and while there are no such plans for the future, here’s a batch of 993-based 911 ’Safari’ renders that might turn into reality should someone crazy enough see them.

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The Interior of This Porsche 993 "Greenwich" By Gunther Werks is the Epitome of Perfection

The Interior of This Porsche 993 "Greenwich" By Gunther Werks is the Epitome of Perfection

Gunther Werks stole our hearts with the beastly 400R and they’re doing it again with this gem

Gunther Werks is back at it again. The crew that brought us the limited-edition $525,000 400R is working on another 993 model dubbed the Greenwich Commission. It’s not fully revealed yet, but Gunther Werks isn’t shying away from bumping our heart rates with a set of interior pictures.

Yes, we’re drooling. But as awesome as it might be, we expect the Greenwich Commission’s interior to be backed up by an exterior and an engine that are least on par when it comes to divine attention to detail and exquisite craftsmanship. Could that be just enough to give Singer a run for its money?

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A $50,000 Windshield Isn't the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

A $50,000 Windshield Isn’t the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

You need to pony up if you want to recreate one of the rarest Porsche models of all time

The Porsche 911 (993) is one of the most sought-after Porsche 911 models in history. Its place in history is secure as the last 911 generation to feature an air-cooled engine. It’s considered the grail among grails, the kind of car that routinely sells for around $200,000. Now imagine a scenario where the grail among grails gets even rarer. Should we call it the grail among the grails among grails? That’d be too confusing so let’s just call it by its actual name: the Porsche 911 (993) Speedster.

The 993 Speedster is so rare that Porsche actually built just two units of the model, one for Ferdinand Alexander Porsche for his 60th birthday in 1995 and another for TV comedian Jerry Seinfeld. In other words, you have a better shot at finding Narnia than spotting an actual 993 Speedster on the road. But, just because these two models are a sight unseen, that doesn’t mean that we can’t see proper replicas that carry the exclusive essence of the 993 Speedster in the proudest way imaginable.

That’s the case with John Sarkisyan, who many of you know is an ace in the classic car restoration and modification scene. Sarkisyan is the man responsible for the Steampunk Porsche 911 and the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, both of which were created on the bones of different models. Sarkisyan’s latest project is this stunning Porsche 993 Speedster, which started its life as a 993 Convertible. This is proper aftermarket tuning done to the absolute peak of its powers. It’s no wonder that, in recreating the 993 Speedster, Sarkisyan ponied up a significant amount of money, including dropping $50,000 on the car’s windshield. Believe it or not, the $50,000 windshield isn’t the only outrageously expensive part of this recreated Porsche 993 Speedster. Then again, that’s the kind of price you have to pay if you want to build yourself a model where there are only two actual ones in existence.

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Porsche 911 GT2 RS - From 444 to 700 Horsepower

Porsche 911 GT2 RS - From 444 to 700 Horsepower

A history of GT2 drivetrains

Porsche has been offering high-performance versions of the 911 since the early 1970s, with the most iconic model being the Carrera 2.7 RS. But once the Germans adopted turbocharging, the traditional RS stepped down, making room for a new range-topping sports car, the 911 GT2. First introduced in 1993, the GT2 is now in its fourth generation, which is based on the 991.2 model. It’s faster, more powerful, and more aerodynamic than its predecessor, while also boasting more technology than ever. Thenew GT2 RS is a massive departure from the first GT2 from more than two decades ago under the skin, and we’re going to look at those changes in a drivetrain comparison for all four generations.

The GT2 was born out of the 993-generation 911 as a homologation vehicle for motorsport purpose. Built to meet GT2 class regulations, the road cars were named accordingly and the nameplate survived to this day. The first GT2 was discontinued in 1998, but Porsche revived the badge in 2002 for the 996 model. After three years, it was again discontinued, only to return as the 997 GT2 in 2008. The 997 was also the first GT2 to get an RS designation, which was offered in very limited numbers from 2010 to 2012. Come 2017 and the GT2 returns to the market as an RS model only. Since 1993, the drivetrain not only swapped air-cooled for water-cooled engines, but also gained more displacement a lot more power. Let’s find out more about that below.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

What you’re looking at here is a 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR that has a bit of a history – in a good way. This particular car was delivered in 1995 as supercup and eventually homologated into GT Championship racing as a 3.8 RSR. The car continued racing in GT Championship until 2002, when it was then used for club and historic races. If you’re wondering about race wins, this car recently won the 2015 FFSA GT Classic championship, beating out cars like the 993 GT2 and even the Dodge Viper.

Included with the purchase of this car, and available for inspection, are maintenance invoices dating back to 2010 that show $109,000 worth of maintenance over the past 6 years. Both the engine and transmission were completely rebuilt during a detailed inspection back in October of 2015, and results from an engine dyno test are available. Items like the shocks and the clutch all have less than eight hours of use on them, and as you can tell from the images, the car is in great condition inside and out.

So, now that we’ve covered a little history of this 993, 3.8 RSR, let’s dive into it and take a closer look at this car and what is so great about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR.

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1993 - 1998 Porsche 911 (993)

1993 - 1998 Porsche 911 (993)

The last of the air-cooled Porsches, the 993 generation of the iconic 911 is seen by some hardcore Porsche purists as the last truly great model in its long lineage, despite the fact that in terms of performance, comfort and safety it has been obviously surpassed by all subsequent generations. Launched at the end of 1993, it was the third all-new 911 in the history of the Zuffenhausen sports car maker, albeit it did feature some carryover parts from the 964 generation.

Penned by Tony Hatter, who is still working at Porsche and recently penned the second-generation Cayman, the 911 (993) brought an air of modernism at the German carmaker, especially when seen from the rear. Featuring wider wheel arches but a much more subdued and somewhat slippery overall look, the model was still very much part of the classic 911 lineage in terms of styling, although sprinkled with many contemporary design motifs. It was under the body shell where most of the novelties resided, with the model featuring a revised flat-six engine lineup and an entirely new suspension that worked to reduce much of the snap-oversteer tendencies of its predecessors.

Built over a span of just under five years, the 993 family featured three body styles, two types of traction and at least six official engine variants. The base model, christened 911 Carrera Coupe, was equipped with an evolution of the 3.6-liter, boxer engine from the 911 (964), first offering 272 horsepower and then 285 horsepower after Porsche upgraded its induction system to VarioRam in 1995. The most powerful variant of this flat-six was found in the hardcore GT2 and the 911 Turbo S, which came with a more-than-satisfying 450 horsepower.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 (993).

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1995 - 1998 Porsche 911 GT2 (993)

1995 - 1998 Porsche 911 GT2 (993)

Porsche is known for many things, but one of its most important achievements is that it has become the most successful brand in motorsport, scoring more than 28,000 victories as of 2015. As a brand, Porsche began tackling the major motorsport events in the early 1950s, but it wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that the Stuttgart-based company became a dominant force. From the 911 Carrera Turbo of 1974 to the 911-based 934 and 935, Porsche demolished everything in its path in Group 4, Group 5 and IMSA racing through the mid-1980s.

As soon as the 964-generation 911 arrived in 1989, the Germans began experimenting with turbocharged racing versions of it, creating the Turbo S LM-GT. The car was raced with moderate success at Sebring and Daytona, but the development work behind it was far more important than its results, as it helped Porsche create the amazing 911 GT2. But to take it to the track, Stuttgart had to meet the FIA’s stringent requirements and build a road-legal homologation run. Thus the 993-generation 911 GT2 was born.

Introduced in 1995, two years after the 993 911 had been launched, the sports car was based on the 911 Turbo and built to GT2 class regulations, with Porsche naming it accordingly. Read on for a full trip down memory lane with the first incarnation of Porsche’s iconic track beast.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Carerra GT2 (993).

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1996 - 1998 Porsche 911 Targa (993)

1996 - 1998 Porsche 911 Targa (993)

Produced between 1993 and 1998, the 993 was the last of the air-cooled Porsches, making it a favorite amongst hard-core 911 extremists for its similarities to the original late-60s 911. For those five short years, it was only within the final three that Porsche created its Targa variant. In the time leading up to its release, Stuttgart claimed that it would not produce such a model, but as soon as 1995 rolled around, there it was, featuring a convertible body with a retractable glass roof.

The 993 breached the market just as Porsche was beginning its slow recovery from a series of financial troubles wrought by the recession of the late 80s and early 90s. The German automaker desperately needed a hit, and thankfully, the 993 delivered.

For many folks, the 993 represents a final expression of purity in motoring experience, with a dearth of driving aides and electronic supervision provided for those behind the wheel. The horizontally opposed, six-cylinder engine is mounted in the correct place, and even though the suspension was updated, anyone who took a corner with any kind of alacrity was advised to keep his or her foot down. A novice-move like lifting mid-corner was usually something that would end with a pirouette into the surrounding terrain, which is just one reason fans love this vehicle.

Given the “last is best” mentality of buying an historic sports car, the 993 is highly desirable in the used-car market, with the rare Targa model even more so. It’s certainly a favorite amongst Porsche lovers, and well-maintained examples often command a surprisingly high price tag.

As technology continues its relentless march into infinity, with hybrid systems, autonomous-driving, and alternative fuels eventually permeating each and every vehicle niche out there, that price will no doubt continue to rise, lending further credit to the 993 Targa’s claim to automotive sainthood.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Targa (993).

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