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The Interior of This Porsche 993 "Greenwich" By Gunther Werks is the Epitome of Perfection

The Interior of This Porsche 993 "Greenwich" By Gunther Werks is the Epitome of Perfection

Gunther Werks stole our hearts with the beastly 400R and they’re doing it again with this gem

Gunther Werks is back at it again. The crew that brought us the limited-edition $525,000 400R is working on another 993 model dubbed the Greenwich Commission. It’s not fully revealed yet, but Gunther Werks isn’t shying away from bumping our heart rates with a set of interior pictures.

Yes, we’re drooling. But as awesome as it might be, we expect the Greenwich Commission’s interior to be backed up by an exterior and an engine that are least on par when it comes to divine attention to detail and exquisite craftsmanship. Could that be just enough to give Singer a run for its money?

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A $50,000 Windshield Isn't the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

A $50,000 Windshield Isn’t the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

You need to pony up if you want to recreate one of the rarest Porsche models of all time

The Porsche 911 (993) is one of the most sought-after Porsche 911 models in history. Its place in history is secure as the last 911 generation to feature an air-cooled engine. It’s considered the grail among grails, the kind of car that routinely sells for around $200,000. Now imagine a scenario where the grail among grails gets even rarer. Should we call it the grail among the grails among grails? That’d be too confusing so let’s just call it by its actual name: the Porsche 911 (993) Speedster.

The 993 Speedster is so rare that Porsche actually built just two units of the model, one for Ferdinand Alexander Porsche for his 60th birthday in 1995 and another for TV comedian Jerry Seinfeld. In other words, you have a better shot at finding Narnia than spotting an actual 993 Speedster on the road. But, just because these two models are a sight unseen, that doesn’t mean that we can’t see proper replicas that carry the exclusive essence of the 993 Speedster in the proudest way imaginable.

That’s the case with John Sarkisyan, who many of you know is an ace in the classic car restoration and modification scene. Sarkisyan is the man responsible for the Steampunk Porsche 911 and the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, both of which were created on the bones of different models. Sarkisyan’s latest project is this stunning Porsche 993 Speedster, which started its life as a 993 Convertible. This is proper aftermarket tuning done to the absolute peak of its powers. It’s no wonder that, in recreating the 993 Speedster, Sarkisyan ponied up a significant amount of money, including dropping $50,000 on the car’s windshield. Believe it or not, the $50,000 windshield isn’t the only outrageously expensive part of this recreated Porsche 993 Speedster. Then again, that’s the kind of price you have to pay if you want to build yourself a model where there are only two actual ones in existence.

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Porsche 911 GT2 RS - From 444 to 700 Horsepower

Porsche 911 GT2 RS - From 444 to 700 Horsepower

A history of GT2 drivetrains

Porsche has been offering high-performance versions of the 911 since the early 1970s, with the most iconic model being the Carrera 2.7 RS. But once the Germans adopted turbocharging, the traditional RS stepped down, making room for a new range-topping sports car, the 911 GT2. First introduced in 1993, the GT2 is now in its fourth generation, which is based on the 991.2 model. It’s faster, more powerful, and more aerodynamic than its predecessor, while also boasting more technology than ever. Thenew GT2 RS is a massive departure from the first GT2 from more than two decades ago under the skin, and we’re going to look at those changes in a drivetrain comparison for all four generations.

The GT2 was born out of the 993-generation 911 as a homologation vehicle for motorsport purpose. Built to meet GT2 class regulations, the road cars were named accordingly and the nameplate survived to this day. The first GT2 was discontinued in 1998, but Porsche revived the badge in 2002 for the 996 model. After three years, it was again discontinued, only to return as the 997 GT2 in 2008. The 997 was also the first GT2 to get an RS designation, which was offered in very limited numbers from 2010 to 2012. Come 2017 and the GT2 returns to the market as an RS model only. Since 1993, the drivetrain not only swapped air-cooled for water-cooled engines, but also gained more displacement a lot more power. Let’s find out more about that below.

Continue reading for the full story.

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1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR

What you’re looking at here is a 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR that has a bit of a history – in a good way. This particular car was delivered in 1995 as supercup and eventually homologated into GT Championship racing as a 3.8 RSR. The car continued racing in GT Championship until 2002, when it was then used for club and historic races. If you’re wondering about race wins, this car recently won the 2015 FFSA GT Classic championship, beating out cars like the 993 GT2 and even the Dodge Viper.

Included with the purchase of this car, and available for inspection, are maintenance invoices dating back to 2010 that show $109,000 worth of maintenance over the past 6 years. Both the engine and transmission were completely rebuilt during a detailed inspection back in October of 2015, and results from an engine dyno test are available. Items like the shocks and the clutch all have less than eight hours of use on them, and as you can tell from the images, the car is in great condition inside and out.

So, now that we’ve covered a little history of this 993, 3.8 RSR, let’s dive into it and take a closer look at this car and what is so great about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1995 Porsche 993 Cup 3.8 RSR.

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1993 - 1998 Porsche 911 (993)

1993 - 1998 Porsche 911 (993)

The last of the air-cooled Porsches, the 993 generation of the iconic 911 is seen by some hardcore Porsche purists as the last truly great model in its long lineage, despite the fact that in terms of performance, comfort and safety it has been obviously surpassed by all subsequent generations. Launched at the end of 1993, it was the third all-new 911 in the history of the Zuffenhausen sports car maker, albeit it did feature some carryover parts from the 964 generation.

Penned by Tony Hatter, who is still working at Porsche and recently penned the second-generation Cayman, the 911 (993) brought an air of modernism at the German carmaker, especially when seen from the rear. Featuring wider wheel arches but a much more subdued and somewhat slippery overall look, the model was still very much part of the classic 911 lineage in terms of styling, although sprinkled with many contemporary design motifs. It was under the body shell where most of the novelties resided, with the model featuring a revised flat-six engine lineup and an entirely new suspension that worked to reduce much of the snap-oversteer tendencies of its predecessors.

Built over a span of just under five years, the 993 family featured three body styles, two types of traction and at least six official engine variants. The base model, christened 911 Carrera Coupe, was equipped with an evolution of the 3.6-liter, boxer engine from the 911 (964), first offering 272 horsepower and then 285 horsepower after Porsche upgraded its induction system to VarioRam in 1995. The most powerful variant of this flat-six was found in the hardcore GT2 and the 911 Turbo S, which came with a more-than-satisfying 450 horsepower.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 (993).

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1995 - 1998 Porsche 911 GT2 (993)

1995 - 1998 Porsche 911 GT2 (993)

Porsche is known for many things, but one of its most important achievements is that it has become the most successful brand in motorsport, scoring more than 28,000 victories as of 2015. As a brand, Porsche began tackling the major motorsport events in the early 1950s, but it wasn’t until the 1970s and 1980s that the Stuttgart-based company became a dominant force. From the 911 Carrera Turbo of 1974 to the 911-based 934 and 935, Porsche demolished everything in its path in Group 4, Group 5 and IMSA racing through the mid-1980s.

As soon as the 964-generation 911 arrived in 1989, the Germans began experimenting with turbocharged racing versions of it, creating the Turbo S LM-GT. The car was raced with moderate success at Sebring and Daytona, but the development work behind it was far more important than its results, as it helped Porsche create the amazing 911 GT2. But to take it to the track, Stuttgart had to meet the FIA’s stringent requirements and build a road-legal homologation run. Thus the 993-generation 911 GT2 was born.

Introduced in 1995, two years after the 993 911 had been launched, the sports car was based on the 911 Turbo and built to GT2 class regulations, with Porsche naming it accordingly. Read on for a full trip down memory lane with the first incarnation of Porsche’s iconic track beast.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Carerra GT2 (993).

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1996 - 1998 Porsche 911 Targa (993)

1996 - 1998 Porsche 911 Targa (993)

Produced between 1993 and 1998, the 993 was the last of the air-cooled Porsches, making it a favorite amongst hard-core 911 extremists for its similarities to the original late-60s 911. For those five short years, it was only within the final three that Porsche created its Targa variant. In the time leading up to its release, Stuttgart claimed that it would not produce such a model, but as soon as 1995 rolled around, there it was, featuring a convertible body with a retractable glass roof.

The 993 breached the market just as Porsche was beginning its slow recovery from a series of financial troubles wrought by the recession of the late 80s and early 90s. The German automaker desperately needed a hit, and thankfully, the 993 delivered.

For many folks, the 993 represents a final expression of purity in motoring experience, with a dearth of driving aides and electronic supervision provided for those behind the wheel. The horizontally opposed, six-cylinder engine is mounted in the correct place, and even though the suspension was updated, anyone who took a corner with any kind of alacrity was advised to keep his or her foot down. A novice-move like lifting mid-corner was usually something that would end with a pirouette into the surrounding terrain, which is just one reason fans love this vehicle.

Given the “last is best” mentality of buying an historic sports car, the 993 is highly desirable in the used-car market, with the rare Targa model even more so. It’s certainly a favorite amongst Porsche lovers, and well-maintained examples often command a surprisingly high price tag.

As technology continues its relentless march into infinity, with hybrid systems, autonomous-driving, and alternative fuels eventually permeating each and every vehicle niche out there, that price will no doubt continue to rise, lending further credit to the 993 Targa’s claim to automotive sainthood.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Targa (993).

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1995 - 1996 Porsche 911 Carerra RS (993)

1995 - 1996 Porsche 911 Carerra RS (993)

No water cooling and analog everything; that was the beauty of the Porsche 911 Carerra RS (993)

It’s been over 15 years since Porsche started selling 911 with radiators, but now, perhaps more than ever, the simple, mechanical nature of pre-996, air-cooled 911s is more desirable than ever. In world of sports cars with numb electro-hydraulic steering racks, hybrid drivetrains and idiot-proof chassis management systems, an old 911 offers a purity of purpose that’s extremely desirable and increasingly hard to find in a new car.

The 993 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 3.8 is arguably the logical and ultimate conclusion of this philosophy. We automotive journalists like to throw around the term “racecar for the road,” but in this case, it’s justified. A direct ancestor of modern RS Porsches, the Euro market-only Carrera RS 3.8 is based on the Carrera Cup competition car and was built as a homologation special to allow the enlarged 3.8-liter engine to be fitted to the 911 RSR racers competing throughout Europe in the late 1990s.

This is no boulevard cruiser. Porsche engineers put the Carrera RS 3.8 on a ruthless crash diet by removing the headliner, electric windows, electric mirrors, central locking, intermittent windshield wipers, radio speakers, power-adjustable seats, rear defroster, airbags and sound insulation. By comparison, it makes the amenities available for modern GT3s and GT3 RSs look like a Maybach. It’s a car for driving for the sake of driving.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Carerra RS (993).

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1998 Porsche 911 ANDIAL 3.8 C2S

1998 Porsche 911 ANDIAL 3.8 C2S

Established in 1975 in Fountain Valley, California, ANDIAL is more than just a tuning house. While the company may not be as famous as Gemballa or TechArt when it comes to beefed-up Porsches, ANDIAL is a big name in racing, helping the Germans win numerous events. Porsche scored six 24 Hours of Daytona victories, four Pikes Peak class titles, the IMSA GT and Supercar Series championships, as well as the SCCA World Challenge using ANDIAL-prepped engines, which says a lot about the California-based tuner. Now a part of Porsche Motorsport North America, who purchased the historic name in 2013, ANDIAL has also delivered some exciting road-going cars over the last two decades. One of them is the 911 3.8 C2S, which was launched in the late 1990s.

Based on the 993-generation 911, the last of the air-cooled 911s, the C2S is the best example of what ANDIAL was capable of back in the day. Don’t mind the lack of visual upgrades, this 911 is about enhanced performance, with all the tweaks operated under the shell. It’s a race car in disguise, one you simply can’t ignore if you’re into true blue sports cars.

Click past the jump to read more about the 1998 Porsche 911 Andial 3.8 C2S.

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Video: Porsche 911 Record at the Silverstone Classics 2013

Video: Porsche 911 Record at the Silverstone Classics 2013

At the end of July, Porsche set a new record for the largest parade of 911 models, with 1,208 different 911s lapping Silverstone at once. Now, two weeks later Porsche decided to finally unveil the video of the record parade.

The parade was part of the celebration of the 911’s 50th anniversary and was organized by Porsche Club Great Britain. Along with bringing together this amazing number of 911s from all generations, the parade also brought into focus legendary drivers and Mark Porsche, the son of Ferdinand Alexander ’Butzi’ Porsche who designed the original 911.

The parade brought together classic Carreras, 911 RSs, RSRs, 911 GTs, Speedsters, Targas, and 911 Turbo and you can spot them all in this short video. Check out the video and try to see how many models can you recognize and which ones would you like to own. We’ll take them all...

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Porsche Sets Record for Largest Parade of 911 Models

Porsche Sets Record for Largest Parade of 911 Models

Porsche continues to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the legendary 911 in some of the coolest ways imaginable.

It’s already checked the special-edition 911 Carrera off its list. Now, it’s taking a completely different approach by hosting a record-breaking parade of Porsche 911 sports cars at the Silverstone Grand Prix over the past weekend.

All in all, 1,208 classic and modern 911s attended the event, all squeezing into what eventually became a completely packed and cramped Silverstone race track. It’s hard enough to see hundreds of 911s in one location but to see well over 1,000 in one location was a completely surreal sight.

Porsche Club GB and Silverstone Classic took center stage in organizing the event and while it was initially pegged to attract hundreds of 911s to the event, not a lot of people expected to hit 1,000, let alone exactly 1,208 Porsche 911s that all trooped over to Silverstone to attend the record-breaking gathering.

If you’re a Porsche aficionado, this is like heaven on wheels. There are classic Carreras, 911 RSs, RSRs, 911 GTs, Speedsters, Targas, and 911 Turbos.

Needless to say, the expectations for the gathering were far exceeded, something Mark Porsche, the son of Porsche 911 designed founder Ferdinand Alexander ‘Butzi’ Porsche, said meant a lot to his family.

“Of course, the 911 means a great deal to me as it’s my father’s big design and it will always have a special place in my heart,” he said.

“It’s been a family member over all the generations of the 911 series and I’m very proud to be here today to represent the Porsche family at this great event. I think that to have these 1,200 cars on track is the attention that the 911 deserves for its 50th birthday. I can’t thank the Porsche Club GB enough for making this event possible.”

Click past the jump to read about the Porsche 911 Carrera 50th Anniversary Edition

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Video: New Porsche 911 Targa Caught Testing With its Fake Soft Top

Video: New Porsche 911 Targa Caught Testing With its Fake Soft Top

The soon-to-be-resurrected Porsche Targa has been caught testing many times, but the only thing we could bring you were some spy shots. Now, YouTube user DrGumoLunatic managed to catch on video the car testing somewhere in the district of Stuttgart, Germany with nearly no disguise on.

As previously rumored, the new Porsche Targa will bring back the famous fixed targa roof option offered for the first time in 1965. This video definitely offers up some confirmation of these rumors, even though the prototype caught testing here tried to hide the targa roof under that fake soft top.

The 911 Targa should be offered with a 3.4-liter direct-injected flat-six engine that delivers a total of 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque. We anticipate the top trim level of the targa model to feature a 3.8-liter flat-six engine with an output of 400 horsepower.

With the testing phase well under way, we expect to see the new 911 Targa unveiled by the end of 2013.

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Spy Shots: 2014 Porsche 911 Targa Still Carrying its Faux Convertible Top in Sweden

Spy Shots: 2014 Porsche 911 Targa Still Carrying its Faux Convertible Top in Sweden

A cult classic, the 911 Targa was phased out with the 964 generation, after living a long life that started in 1965. Rumors have been swirling around about its resurrection and our spy photographers have even caught this machine on the road a few times, but it was donning a not-so-impressive disguise: a canvas coating on the roof that made it appear to be just a simple convertible model.

Today, our spy photographers caught the upcoming Porsche 911 Targa for a second time. Unfortunately, it is still wearing its convertible disguise, but it is easy to spot the separation where the removable top is. The official details on the 911 Targa are still completely unknown and we are not too sure if it will be offered as a two-wheel- or four-wheel-drive model, or possibly the option of both.

You can expect to see the 911 Targa unveiled sometime later this year and it should be in stores in time to make it a 2014 model year.

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2013 Porsche 997 GT3 R by Falken Motorsports

2013 Porsche 997 GT3 R by Falken Motorsports

Falken Motorsports announced the first details on its upgraded Porsche 997 GT3 R that will be raced in this year’s VLN and Nürburgring 24 Hours events. The driver lineup will remain unchanged and will include: Sebastian Asch, Peter Dumbreck, Wolf Henzler and Martin Ragginger.

The 2013 GT3 R has been upgraded with a new aerodynamic package that includes wider wings, new splitter and double canards, plus a larger rear wing that helps increase downforce. Falken Motorsports also installed enlarged cooling vents around the front, while the wheel arches have also been enlarged to allow the car to ride on larger wheels and tires when compared to last year.

Under the hood, the car will keep the usual 4-liter, flat-six-cylinder engine that delivers a total of 500 horsepower.

First tests of the car will be made at the March, 16th at the annual VLN setup day.

Stay tune for more information.

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Porsche Celebrating the 911's Anniversary with Two Debuts in Geneva

Porsche Celebrating the 911’s Anniversary with Two Debuts in Geneva

Porsche is celebrating the 911’s anniversary with two surprises prepared for the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, and the German automaker describes one of them as "very exciting." No other details have been offered, but Porsche did confirm that it will offer "new engineering highlights, plus driving dynamics and driving excitement at an even higher level than before."

In its 50 years of production, the Porsche 911 delivered impressive result on both the road and the race track. With a total of 820,000 units built during this period, the 911 is the world’s most successful sports car ever.

Alongside these two new special editions, Porsche will also unveil the new-generation 911 GT3 Cup, which is "the best-selling and most successful sports car in the world."

Full details on these two new models will be unveiled during their official debut at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show on March 5th. Stay tuned for more!

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Porsche Recalls Carrera and Carrera 4 Over Faulty Exhaust

Porsche Recalls Carrera and Carrera 4 Over Faulty Exhaust

Porsche rarely ever has a recall, but today it has issued one because of a faulty exhaust system that can result in other drivers being in danger.

Porsche North America has issued a voluntary recall for 2012 to 2013 911 Carrera and Carrera 4 vehicles manufactured from March 7, 2012 through November 12, 2012 and equipped with a standard (not sport) exhaust system. According to the recall report, the tailpipe may crack, which can result in the pipe breaking free from the muffler and fall onto the road while you are driving, In such a case, the 911 may become a hazard for other vehicles on the road, increasing the risk of a crash.

Porsche announced that each owner will be notified and local dealers will replace the rear mufflers free of charge. Still, if you drive such a model you are being advised to contact Porsche at 1-800-767-7243.

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New Porsche 911 RSR Successfully Concludes Test Drives

New Porsche 911 RSR Successfully Concludes Test Drives

Porsche is almost done with its development of thenew-generation 991 RSR. The new 911 GT3 RSR will make its racing debut on April 14th and will be run exclusively by the Porsche AG Team Manthey works squad at the 24 Hours of Le Mans and in the World Endurance Championship (WEC).

Porsche is now finished testing the car on the Sebring International Raceway in Miami, Florida and it looks like the company is pretty excited about how the testing went. Until the race season kicks off in Silverstone, Porsche will conduct some final tests on other race tracks to be sure that the GT3 RSR is truly ready for the World Endurance Championship season.

Porsche revealed no details on the RSR just yet, but rumors suggest it will get ultra-wide fenders, a sharp aerodynamic package and, of course, extra air intakes for better engine cooling. The model will be powered by the same 4.0-liter six-cylinder boxer engine found in the standard GT3, but with an improved output.

Full details will be unveiled pretty shortly, stay tuned!

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Video: Marc Lieb Can Race Porsche, but He Sure Can't Park One

Video: Marc Lieb Can Race Porsche, but He Sure Can’t Park One

Marc Lieb has scored some pretty impressive stats -including three overall wins - during his 10 years of experience with the Porsche Racing team. However, when it comes to road driving, Lieb is pretty much like any other driver and apparently he has problems with reverse parking. Or at least this is what Porsche wants us to think!

The company is preparing a series of videos that will present us the real challenges of its drivers. You can imagine they have a lot to work, considering they have to participate in up to 25 races a year. According to Porsche, each driver needs to have "talent, learning aptitude, speed, stamina, discipline and flexibility.” Each day they need to prepare so they can adapt to fast changing situations on the race track!

Oddly enough, we guess Porsche doesn’t require their drivers how to park their Porsche…

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Video: Nissan Juke-R Vs. Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Video: Nissan Juke-R Vs. Porsche 911 GT2 RS

It was confirmed that the Juke-R will hit production, based on the 2012 GT-R specs, so this means it is time to pit it against some of the best sports cars on the planet. Car and Driver did just that with a great piece pitting the Juke-R against the best Porsche has to offer, the 911 GT2 RS. We need to keep in mind here that the test-model Juke-R is based on the initial run GT-R’s drivetrain, including its 495-horsepower, 3.8-liter (the video says 3.7-liter for some reason) V-6 twin-boost engine. The production Juke-R will come with the 2012 GT-R specs, including a boost to 530 horsepower, but will also cost about $590,000. No, that’s not a typo.

In the other corner sits the $245,000 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, which boasts a 620-horsepower 3.6-liter flat-6 and a significant weight advantage. In the video, this crazy driver decides to take the cars to Bedford Autodrome and put their lap times to the test. Following that test, the team hits up an airfield and puts the two to a 1-mile test.

Putting a 620-horsepower GT2 RS against a heavier Juke-R with a 125-horsepower deficiency typically means a win on all fronts for the GT2 RS. However, this test involves a slightly wet track and the Juke-R features the GT-R’s impressive AWD system, so the Juke-R just may come out on top.

To find out, you’re going to have to check out the video. Not only is the video chock-full of racing action, but it also features some kick-ass slow-motion scenes that will blow your mind and tons of sweet, sweet noise.

Enjoy!

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