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2017 Porsche 718 Boxster

2017 Porsche 718 Boxster High Resolution Exterior
- image 663470
  • Porsche 718 Boxster
  • Year:
    2017
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    flat-4
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    300 @ 6500
  • Torque @ RPM:
    280
  • Displacement:
    2.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    4.9 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    170 mph
  • Price:
    56000
  • Price:
  • car segment:
  • body style:

The Porsche Boxster has received its most comprehensive facelift yet, gaining a new name, a more aggressive design, and turbocharged, flat-four engines.

The 1997-2004 Porsche Boxster was introduced in 1996 as an entry-level, mid-engined sports car. It was Porsche’s first road-going roadster since the 550 Spyder. Although it was received with mild criticism and was seen as a departure from Porsche tradition, the Boxster quickly grew on enthusiasts to become the company’s biggest volume seller until the Cayenne SUV was launched in 2003. Twenty years have passed since its debut and the roadster received the most important facelift of its life.

Much like the new 911 Carrera, the Boxster has ditched its naturally aspirated engine in favor of turbocharged units, as part of Porsche’s new strategy to reduce emissions and improve efficiency. More importantly, the said turbo mills use a different, flat-four configuration instead of the traditional flat-six, making the Boxster the first Porsche sports car to use a four-cylinder in several decades. The facelift also brings a name change to the lineup, with the Boxster to be sold as the 718 Boxster from now on.

Although new to the Boxster, the "718" denomination isn’t new to Porsche. The Germans used the same nameplate for a lightweight sports car built between 1957 and 1962. The fact that Porsche decided to revive the name with the Boxster is no coincidence, as the 718 also used four-cylinder engines. On top of that, the original 718 was quite a successful race car, winning the Targa Florio, European Hill Climb championship, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans (class win), so it’s natural for the automaker to want to exploit its motorsport heritage.

The 718 name will also be used for the Cayman once the coupe gets its update, but until that happens, let’s have a closer look at the revamped Boxster in the review below.

Update: 05/21/2016: We’ve made a new video highlighting the Porsche 718 Boxter. Press "play" to check it out.

Continue reading to find out more about the 2016 Porsche Boxster.

 

Latest Porsche Boxster news and reviews:

Would You Pay $3,000 For A Dual-Clutch Transmission in Your Porsche 718 Boxster or Cayman GTS?

Would You Pay $3,000 For A Dual-Clutch Transmission in Your Porsche 718 Boxster or Cayman GTS?

Porsche updated the 718 Boxster and Cayman. New PDK transmission available

The GTS 4.0 versions of the Porsche 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, basically the only naturally aspirated models you can buy, are now available with a new seven-speed, dual-clutch transmission (PDK).

These gearboxes are similar to those offered in the 718 Boxster Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4. They make both models quicker from 0 to 62 mph, but they also cost £2,300, which converts to roughly $3,000 as of September 2020. Is the premium worth it? Let’s find out!

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Apparently You Can Turn the Porsche Boxster Into a 1960s F1 Car

Apparently You Can Turn the Porsche Boxster Into a 1960s F1 Car

This 1960s-inspired Formula One car started out as a Porsche Boxster

As a fan of 1960s Formula One racing, it’s really painful to watch the modern version of the sport, which is more about technology and strategy rather than talent and innovation. And you can’t really own 1960s F1 cars since they’re massively more expensive than classic road cars from the era. But a dedicated enthusiast took matters into his own hands and turned an old Porsche Boxster into an F1 car inspired by the 1960s design.

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Here's the Evolution of the Porsche Boxster and How It Saved Porsche In the Early 1990s

Here’s the Evolution of the Porsche Boxster and How It Saved Porsche In the Early 1990s

This dynamic infographic will teach you everything you need to know about the Porsche Boxster

Porsche may be a successful company right now, but it had it’s fair share of financial difficulties in the past. The early 1990s were pretty rough for the Germans, as sales had dropped from more than 50,000 units a year in 1986 to only 14,000 examples in 1993. Porsche had to do something about it and a new 911 model wasn’t enough. So the German company started exploring other possibilities, including a replacement for the front-engined, entry-level line that previously included the 924, 944, and 968. Some say that Porsche looked to the success Mazda was having with the Miata and opted to design a new mid-engined roadster inspired by the iconic 550 Spyder of the 1950s. It was dubbed the Boxster, it was cheaper than the 911 but still fast and powerful, and it saved Porsche from bankruptcy. The folks over at Car Evolution just posted a cool video that show how this nameplate evolved in almost 25 years on the market.

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2021 Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman: What's New?

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman: What’s New?

Porsche is keeping its entry-level sports cars fresh with a host of new updates

Taking care of the models in your lineup, upgrading them on a yearly basis or simply applying a nip and tuck every now and then is pretty much like nurturing children.

For the 2021MY, Porsche is making sure the 718 Boxster and Cayman brothers are in top shape to perform in the market but most importantly, on the road, too.

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You Can Now Have a Porsche Boxster Shooting Brake, But Is It Blasphemy?

You Can Now Have a Porsche Boxster Shooting Brake, But Is It Blasphemy?

The jury is still out on this one, so we need your opinions

Look. We’d take a wagon over a high-riding SUV any day of the week. Perhaps that’s why the undersigned loved the Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo so much that he pledged to buy one someday.

The thing is, however, Porsche and station wagons don’t exactly go hand in hand. People went out of their minds when the carmaker introduced the Cayenne, so we doubt that an out-and-out family hauler built by Porsche would get the fans jumping for joy. That said, what about a Boxster-based shooting brake? Is that something you’d take out for a spin to the hypermarket and back?

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10 of the Fastest Cars Available for Under $15,000

10 of the Fastest Cars Available for Under $15,000

There are excellent examples out there, provided you are okay with buying pre-owned cars

There are a lot of benefits in buying a pre-owned car. Instead of being stuck on a particular segment due to budget constraints, you can actually choose a car from the higher tiers when you look at the used market. You don’t have to worry about the depreciation hit in the car as well. And, when it comes to fast, cool cars, you don’t have to wait for the run-in period to complete and you can redline it from day one. In fact, if you spend some time researching, you can find some real treasures as well. To help you out, we’ve listed ten of the fastest cars that you can get for less than $15,000.

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2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0

The naturally aspirated flat-six makes a comeback!

The 2021 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 is a naturally-aspirated version of the existing 718 Boxster. Essentially an update for the current 718 Cayman GTS, the GTS 4.0 ditches the turbocharged, 2.5-liter flat-four engine in favor of a 4.0-liter flat-six mill.

The engine is shared with the range-topping 2020 718 Boxster, but detuned in order to slot the GTS 4.0 lower in the lineup. Unveiled alongside an identical version of the 718 Cayman, the 2021 718 Boxster GTS 4.0 hits the road with 394 horsepower and various suspension components borrowed from the 911 GT3.

The GTS 4.0 also marks the return of the naturally aspirated engine in the 718 Boxster lineup (beyond the Spyder model of course), but it will probably be offered only for a limited time. Let’s find out more about it in the review below.

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A PDK is Coming for the Porsche 718 GT4 Boxster & Cayman By the End of the Year

A PDK is Coming for the Porsche 718 GT4 Boxster & Cayman By the End of the Year

Sorry, purists, but the PDK is quicker and it doesn’t murder fun

A lot of Porschephiles gave a standing ovation in front of their news feeds back in the summer of 2019 when Porsche introduced the 2020 718 Cayman GT4 and its topless twin, the 718 Boxster Spyder GT4.

Those same aficionados might not be so eager to jump for joy as Porsche plans to fit the 718 GT4 siblings with its lightning-quick PDK gearbox. Fret not, though: the manual won’t be dropped.

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The New Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS 4.0 Are Here to Please Purists

The New Porsche 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS 4.0 Are Here to Please Purists

The flat-six is back for the 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS under the 4.0 nameplate

Gone is the 2.5-liter flat-four that motivated the previous-gen 718 Boxster and Cayman GTS.The new 718 duo adds the 4.0 badge and with it, a naturally-aspirated flat-six mill that’s bound to tickle the fancy for a lot of Porsche purists.

What’s more, the 4.0-liter engine is the exact same one currently found in the Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4, but it’s been detuned a little. Oh, and according to Autoblog3, the four-cylinder-powered models will be retired after the 2019 model year.

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Watch a Volkswagen Golf R Go Head-to-Head With a Porsche Boxster GTS and a Renault Megane Trophy RS

Watch a Volkswagen Golf R Go Head-to-Head With a Porsche Boxster GTS and a Renault Megane Trophy RS

It’s a triple threat throwdown of epic proportions!

The term “performance car” has taken on an entirely new meaning these days, so much so that even small compact hatchbacks can be identified as a performance car if it, well, performs like one. Take the Volkswagen Golf R and the Renault Megane RS Trophy, for example. You wouldn’t think of them as pocket rockets when you first see them, but they’re more than capable of turning your world upside down if you underestimate their performance capabilities. The all-wheel-drive Golf R and the front-wheel-drive Megane RS Trophy are bullets wrapped in an automotive body. But can they actually beat a car that was bred to be a performance savant like the Porsche 718 Boxster GTS?YouTube channel carwow sought to find out, and the results were, shall I say, interesting.

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2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

The 2020 Boxster Spyder remains naturally aspirated, packs more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder is the range-topping version of the 982-generation Boxster. Based on a sports car introduced in 2016, the 2020 Boxster Spyder is the first to wear a "718" badge. Launched alongside the 718 Cayman GT4, its coupe counterpart, the Boxster Spyder features the largest and most powerful engine ever fitted into Porsche’s entry-level model.

The Boxster Spyder, inspired by the 718 race car from the 1950s, came to life in 2009 and returned for the 2016 model year. For 2019, the Spyder remains a limited-edition model that will probably earn collectible status in the near future. But does it have what it takes to compete with other similar sports cars, especially given its expensive price tag? Let’s find out in the review below.

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2020 Porsche 718 GT4 and 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder Quirks and Features

2020 Porsche 718 GT4 and 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder Quirks and Features

The new 718 Cayman GT4 and the 718 Spyder could be the most appealing Porsche sports cars on sale right now

While quicker and more responsive than ever, the latest line of Porsche 718 cars received a mixed response from Porsche enthusiasts and owners. Integration of four-cylinder engines completely changed the nature of them, but Porsche is trying to save what it can by the introduction of the new generation Porsche 718 GT4. This one, unlike lesser models, gains an all-new 4.0-liter, flat-six with more than 400 horsepower on tap and a manual transmission. It is, by far, the most alluring 718 that ever appeared and, to some, the most appealing Porsche of the new generation. I will give you here the most essential quirks and features about it.

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Porsche 718 Spyder Debuts with Flat-Six Engine and Sub-$100K Price

Porsche 718 Spyder Debuts with Flat-Six Engine and Sub-$100K Price

What happened to the turbo flat-four?

It’s been three years since Porsche redesigned the Boxster and we’re finally witnessing the return of the iconic Spyder model. First introduced in 2009 and relaunched in 2015, the Boxster returns wearing the iconic "718" badge, which makes it the first car to wear the full name of its spiritual predecessor, the 718 Spyder of the 1960s. Just like the previous Boxster Spyder, the new sports car features a flat-six engine, as surprising choice given that the current 718 Boxster is a turbo, flat-four-only vehicle.

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A Roofless Porsche Cayman Is Here To Remind You Of The Bergspyder, a 847-pound racer

A Roofless Porsche Cayman Is Here To Remind You Of The Bergspyder, a 847-pound racer

The Porsche 909 Bergspyder remains the lightest Porsche ever, lighter even than the Porsche 804 F1 car, and this Cayman follows in its footsteps

Porsche likes keeping secrets. With a vault full of priceless cars and many projects ongoing at the same time, we sometimes get surprised when something new comes out of Wiessach, and this is just such a moment. What you’re looking at is a roofless Cayman with one seat and a minimalistic roll hoop or, to be more pedantic, a Boxster from the third generation modified to be lighter than ever. It’s inspired by the 909 Bergspyder from 1968, and it only weighs 2,422 pounds, a whopping 741 pounds lighter than a Boxster GTS with the PDK transmission and 476 pounds lighter than the Boxster Spyder.

Now, all of you Porsche fanatics out there, don’t jump on your computers dropping emails to Porsche asking about this thing, officially known as the Boxster Bergspyder, because it’s not really real. I mean, it is real, the car in the shots does exist, but that’s it. Porsche built only one to mark the 50th anniversary of the 909 Bergspyder and, due to potential registration issues, decided to break the mold after that. So, yes, if you want an ultra-light Boxster you still have to wait for the 718 Boxster Spyder but you can already be sure it won’t be as light as this one because it can’t be. Also, what’s cool about the 981-generation Boxster Bergspyder is that it’s powered by the 3.8-liter mill from the 2016 Cayman GT4 so there’re no turbos. Oh, how we wish Porsche would change its mind...

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If You Like to Keep it Simple, the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman T or 718 Boxster T Might be for You

If You Like to Keep it Simple, the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman T or 718 Boxster T Might be for You

The no-nonsense T treatment extends beyond the 911 Carrera

A no-nonsense, old-school take on the modern Porsche 911, the Carrera T has been a big hit with enthusiasts. Porsche is now building on the momentum with T-badged versions of the 718 Boxster and Cayman.

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Would You Pay $5,000 More to Own a 2020 BMW Z4 Over a 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster?

Would You Pay $5,000 More to Own a 2020 BMW Z4 Over a 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster?

These two Teutonic titans of open-top motoring look like they’re headed for a showdown!

After several years left on the shelf to rot, the Z4 nameplate is making its comeback. Official details are still trickling out, but now we’ve got a sneak peek at the goods thanks to a number of documents that just leaked online.

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I Drove 1,780 Horsepower Worth Of Cars In France On Possibly The Best Tires On Earth

I Drove 1,780 Horsepower Worth Of Cars In France On Possibly The Best Tires On Earth

I Am Amazed By The New Black Chili Filled Continentals

Continental AG invited me to spend three days in Nice, France, drive really nice cars, experience its #blackchili driving experience and gorge on vine and fish of all kinds prepared by some of the best chefs around.

I said yes.

This is what I saw, drove and experienced there.

1,780 horsepower worth of cars were parked down the alley of a hotel with a golf course. All of them were white, all of them had OEM Continental tires on them. UUHP tires, mind you. That is short for Ultra Ultra High Performance and all of them had striking, yet subtle Continental decals. Right from the get-go, it was clear this wasn’t going to be a classic journalist driving event. It was more of a celebration and a party. I liked it.

The weather was at nice 78 degrees Fahrenheit, without a single cloud on the perfectly blue sky over the Cote d’Azur. Down at that parking - 10 cars - two Mercedes-AMG C43 Cabrios, two BMW M240i xDrive Convertibles, two Porsche 718 Boxsters, two Tesla Model Ss, and two Audi RS3 Sportbacks.

FYI, the Porsche was the least powerful one there. And when the Porsche is the least powerful at a car event, things are off to a good start.

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1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986)

1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986)

A 911 droptop for the everyman

Although it might look like Porsche is at the top of its game these days, the Stuttgart brand has seen plenty of rough spots over the years. For example, back in the ‘90s, Porsche went through a period of stagnation and financial difficulty that very nearly killed the brand, but luckily, Porsche managed to put together just the right recipe to bring it back from the brink of bankruptcy. It’s called the Boxster..

Framed as a more accessible entry into the Porsche lifestyle, the Boxster 986 was the first model to carry the Boxster nameplate, with the first-gen lasting from 1996 to 2004. The name itself is an amalgamation of the words “roadster,” a nod to the car’s body style, and “boxer,” which is a nod to the car’s engine configuration. Equipped with classic Porsche styling, faultless handling characteristics, and a rev-happy powerplant, the Boxster was a smash hit for sales, and it is now credited with playing an integral part in Porsche’s late-‘90s renaissance.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986).

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Porsche Says No to All-Electric 911, But Maybe to an All-Electric Porsche 718

Porsche Says No to All-Electric 911, But Maybe to an All-Electric Porsche 718

And, the Plug-in 911 is still a few years out...

Porsche has done as good a job as any automaker in adapting to the times while still keeping its brand identity intact. A good example of that is the upcoming, high-performance plug-in hybrid version of the Porsche 911. We already know that the model is going to happen, but just because the 911 will be offered as a plug-in hybrid, that doesn’t mean Porsche is ready to take it a step further and offer an all-electric version of its most iconic nameplate. A Porsche 911 EV is not happening, though if you cross fingers, an all-electric powertrain could make it eventually find its way to the 718 twins.

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A Porsche with Less Than 2.0-liters of Displacement? Probably Not Going to Happen

A Porsche with Less Than 2.0-liters of Displacement? Probably Not Going to Happen

It’s possible to go that route, but it doesn’t make sense from a business perspective

Porsche’s decision to fit a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine inside the 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster models didn’t sit too well with some of the brand’s most hardcore supporters. Fortunately, they shouldn’t worry about seeing a smaller engine on future models because Porsche has no plans of ever going that route. The German automaker indicated that it could do it if it wanted to, but it’s not considering that option because it doesn’t make sense from a performance point of view.

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The Porsche 718 Twins Come to L.A. with Extra Horsepower and GTS Badges

The Porsche 718 Twins Come to L.A. with Extra Horsepower and GTS Badges

The 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster are more potent than ever before

There are plenty of reasons to love the Porsche 718 Cayman and the 718 Boxster. Their “S” variants pack 350 horsepower and 350 pound-feet of torque, good enough to get them to run at speeds that approach 180 mph. But in the event that those performance numbers aren’t enough to satisfy your thirst for speed, Porsche has a solution in the new 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster GTS models. The two units made their debuts at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show, and they come packing more power to go along with the three-letter nomenclature that has come to define many Porsche models in the past.

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2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

New turbocharged engine makes it quicker and more fuel efficient

First introduced in 1996 as the company’s entry-level sports car, the Porsche Boxster is now in its third generation, and it just received the GTS treatment with exclusive features and more power. Redesigned to include styling cues from the 911 and 918 Spyder, the third-gen Boxster also received a new, more rigid chassis, revised engine, and a small weight reduction compared to its predecessor. The engine lineup included three flat-six units at first, but this changed in 2016 when a comprehensive facelift replaced them with smaller, turbocharged flat-four powerplants. The update also brought a new name, with the "718" denomination added to the "Boxster" badge as a tribute to Porsche’s iconic race car from the late 1950s. With both the base model and the higher-performance S version already in showrooms, Porsche just expanded the Boxster family with the higher performance GTS version.

Spotted testing in the wild since 2016, the GTS is one of two higher performance versions of the Boxster. While not as aggressive and exclusive as the Spyder, the GTS is indeed a significant upgrade over the Boxster S. Lighter, more powerful, and fitted with extra gear; it gives owner access to more speed and quicker sprint times. When GTS prototypes were first spotted on the road, the first question that came to mind was whether or not the nameplate would also make a switch to turbocharged engines. As it turns out, the naturally aspirated Porsche is slowly dying, and the Boxster GTS also embraced forced induction. How does it compare to the previous model? Find out in the review below.

Updated 2-11-2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS taken at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show. Check them out in the gallery below!

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Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

For this kind of money you can lease a very nice vehicle... or maybe two

We’ve heard the story before, and for some reason, the idea keeps coming around. So what is it that I’m talking about? Well, I’m talking about car subscription services. And, the latest to jump into the ranks is Porsche with a new program that will let you pay a monthly fee for access to cars like the Porsche 718 Boxer, Cayman S, Macan S and the Cayenne. The monthly fee? Oh, just $2,000. For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars. If you want more, you can level up from the “launch” package to the “accelerate” package for an extra $1,000 – bringing the monthly total to $3,000. With that subscription, you’ll get access to models like Macan GTS, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Panamera 4S, and the Carrera S. Basically, “Launch” gives you the basic, entry-level models while “Accelerate” gives you access to the higher trim levels.

Now, the first thought that really comes to mind is that the price seems quite high, and that wouldn’t necessarily be a wrong thought, but it does include at least some incentives. First off, the subscription includes vehicle tax and registration, insurance, maintenance, and detailing. It’s all based on a mobile phone app, and there is a one-time activation fee of $500 as well. Plus, you’ll have to pass a credit and background check too. Once users receive their first vehicle same day or future vehicle exchanges can be requested via the app. For now, the program is available to those residing in the metro Atlanta area and is made available through a collaboration between Clutch Technologies LLC and Porsche Passport. So, how does this subscription service stack up against purchasing your own Porsche? Well, let’s take a look.

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Porsche Will Sell Watered Down Versions Of These Models In China

Porsche Will Sell Watered Down Versions Of These Models In China

Like just about every automaker in the industry, Porsche counts China as one of its biggest and most important markets. The German automaker admittedly hasn’t reached the heights it wants in the country, so to remedy that, it’s planning to offer cheaper and less powerful versions of the latest Boxster and Cayman models.

The move comes in the wake of tepid sales for the German automaker’s sports car line, a far cry from the popularity of the Cayenne SUV in the market. Speaking with Automotive News Europe, Jan Roth, the head of Porsche’s 718 model line, lamented that the company’s primary issue involves the pricing of the two models. The flat-six version of the Cayman, for example, was priced at 700,000 renminbi, which converts to about $105,000 based on current exchange rates. But according to Roth, Chinese customers are more inclined to purchase a sports car that sells for less than 600,000 (about $90,000), calling the amount the “magical threshold for customers in China.”

So to appease the market, Porsche is planning to develop “China-specific” Boxster and Cayman models to persuade reluctant buyers to consider the two models. Not much is known about how the company plans to specifically package these models, but one certainty is that both base versions of the Boxster and Cayman will utilize a 2.0-liter four-cylinder boxer engine that produces 250 horsepower. It’s a slight drop in power from the traditional, 275-horsepower base Cayman model that all other markets will have, but it could spell the difference between attracting more Chinese customers to the table, especially if Porsche prices it right at the level that customers are willing to spend for the car.

That’s going to be the big question now that Porsche appears to be gearing up for this move. How much will these two base Boxster and Cayman models be priced? If Roth’s comments are any indication, somewhere in the 600,000 renminbi range is as good a guess as any at this point.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2017 Porsche 718 Boxster

2017 Porsche 718 Boxster

The Porsche Boxster has received its most comprehensive facelift yet, gaining a new name, a more aggressive design, and turbocharged, flat-four engines.

The 1997-2004 Porsche Boxster was introduced in 1996 as an entry-level, mid-engined sports car. It was Porsche’s first road-going roadster since the 550 Spyder. Although it was received with mild criticism and was seen as a departure from Porsche tradition, the Boxster quickly grew on enthusiasts to become the company’s biggest volume seller until the Cayenne SUV was launched in 2003. Twenty years have passed since its debut and the roadster received the most important facelift of its life.

Much like the new 911 Carrera, the Boxster has ditched its naturally aspirated engine in favor of turbocharged units, as part of Porsche’s new strategy to reduce emissions and improve efficiency. More importantly, the said turbo mills use a different, flat-four configuration instead of the traditional flat-six, making the Boxster the first Porsche sports car to use a four-cylinder in several decades. The facelift also brings a name change to the lineup, with the Boxster to be sold as the 718 Boxster from now on.

Although new to the Boxster, the "718" denomination isn’t new to Porsche. The Germans used the same nameplate for a lightweight sports car built between 1957 and 1962. The fact that Porsche decided to revive the name with the Boxster is no coincidence, as the 718 also used four-cylinder engines. On top of that, the original 718 was quite a successful race car, winning the Targa Florio, European Hill Climb championship, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans (class win), so it’s natural for the automaker to want to exploit its motorsport heritage.

The 718 name will also be used for the Cayman once the coupe gets its update, but until that happens, let’s have a closer look at the revamped Boxster in the review below.

Update: 05/21/2016: We’ve made a new video highlighting the Porsche 718 Boxter. Press "play" to check it out.

Continue reading to find out more about the 2016 Porsche Boxster.

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New Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled

New Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled

More speed, more power, old school name

It’s been two decades since Porsche first gave us the Boxster, and now Stuttgart is revitalizing the old standby mid-engine roadster with a new generation. It’s called the Porsche 718, and it takes inspiration from the winning flat-four-engined cars of the ‘50s and ‘60s. More importantly, it’s sharper, more powerful, and of course, even faster than the outgoing Boxster.

Let’s start with the powerplant. Customers will have two new engines to choose from, starting with a turbo 2.0-liter in the base 718 Boxster. Output is rated at 300 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque between 1,950 and 4,500 rpm. Next up is the 718 Boxster S, which gets a turbo 2.5-liter with 350 horsepower and 309 pound-feet of torque between 1,900 rpm and 4,500 rpm.

Those are significant gains over the outgoing model, which makes the 718 faster, too. Equip the base model with the optional PDK transmission and Sport Chrono Package, and you’re looking at a 0-to-60 mph time of 4.5 seconds, a 0.7-second improvement. Top speed is 170 mph, an 8-mph gain. Put the PDK and Sport Chrono Package on the S, and 0-to-60 mph is dispatched in 4.0 seconds (half a second quicker), while top speed is 177 mph (5 mph faster). Interestingly, Porsche claims both engines are also more efficient, and will provide exact EPA figures at a later date.

A six-speed manual comes standard. To complement the new engines, Porsche retuned the suspension and upgraded the brakes. The electric steering is now 10 percent quicker. Lateral acceleration enthusiasts are encouraged to opt for the Porsche Active Suspension Management system, which lowers ride height by 10 mm on the base model and 20 mm on the S.

Aesthetically, Porsche says it changed every body panel except the luggage compartment lids, windshield, and convertible top. There are larger intakes up front, as well as new headlights with a bi-xenon lighting element and LED DRLs. Full LED headlights with four-point DRLs are optional. The S gains standard 19-inch wheels with the option for 20-inchers. The rear is equipped with LED taillights.

Inside, the cabin gains a new dash. A touchscreen, 110-watt stereo, and Porsche Communication Management are standard, while navigation with voice control is optional.

The 718 and 718 S will arrive in U.S. dealerships late this June. Pricing starts at $56,000 for the base model, and $68,400 for the S. Expect a public debut at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

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Porsche Cayman And Boxster Will be Renamed To 718 Cayman And 718 Boxster

Porsche Cayman And Boxster Will be Renamed To 718 Cayman And 718 Boxster

The Porsche Boxster and Cayman are set to receive significant changes beginning with the 2016 models of both mid-engine sports cars. For starters, both the Boxster and the Cayman are scheduled to get new names. Taking a page from its traditional style of naming its vehicles, the Boxster and the Cayman will be renamed the 718 Boxster and the 718 Cayman.

Porsche made the announcement in a press release, even though it didn’t exactly explain the reason behind the decision to add the historically significant “718” name to both mid-engined sports cars. Porsche purists know that the 718 designation is a reference to the ground-breaking, open-top race car that Porsche built from 1957 to 1962. The original 718 was a two-seater, 1.5-liter sports car that was adapted to compete in a number of different formulas during its years with Porsche, most notably in 1961 when it competed in Formula One and propelled driver Dan Gurney to a fourth place finish in the driver’s championship.

Neither the Boxster nor the Cayman have any historical ties to the original 718 so it’s interesting to hear why Porsche decided to dust off the name and give it to both models. Whatever rationale Porsche has, it does look more and more certain that we’re going to see the legendary 718 name back into the fold. Younger fans of Porsche may not be familiar with it, but rest assured, the historical significance attached to the name speaks to the rich and oftentimes successful history Porsche has in motorsports.

Both the 718 Boxster and the 718 Cayman will be next-generation models when they make their debuts in 2016. Details have been scant at this point, but Porsche did say that the two models will be more similar than they have been in the past. That’s interesting considering both are already nearly identical to each other except for a few notable exceptions.

Continue reading for the full story.

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EVO Reviews the Porsche Boxster Spyder: Video

EVO Reviews the Porsche Boxster Spyder: Video

The 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder is the fastest Boxster to date by some margin. Its 3.8-liter flat-six produces 375 horsepower and is the same engine found in both the 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 and 2015 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS. It’s also the first Boxster to be faster than a base model 911 Carrera, so our pals at Evo Magazine decided to drive one on some spectacular roads in Northern Italy to see what the new, range-topping Boxster is all about. They were also nice enough to document the entire thing on video.

First, a roof demonstration. Unlike the standard Boxster, which has an auto-folding soft top, the Spyder has a much more rudimentary top that needs to be manually fitted and removed from outside the car. It’s stored under the rear deck, which includes two speedster humps, and saves a bit of weight over the standard Boxster’s auto roof. But, you don’t buy a Boxster Spyder because of its roof, you buy it for open-top driving awesomeness. The lack of roof makes the 3.8-liter that extra bit more vocal from within the cabin — a trait put on display here when Henry Catchpole drives it through a tunnel — and provides a panoramic view of gorgeous environs like Northern Italy.

The Spyder is sort of the roofless equivalent of the Cayman GT4, but unlike the GT4, it wasn’t honed by Porsche’s ‘GT’ division. It doesn’t have the same front axle assembly and is a bit down on power to the 385-horsepower GT4, but it does retain an honest-to-God six-speed manual transmission and typically excellent Boxster dynamics.

Check out the video and then read our full review of the Boxster Spyder.

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Porsche Boxster Facelift Caught Testing In Stuttgart: Spy Shots

Porsche Boxster Facelift Caught Testing In Stuttgart: Spy Shots

The 2014-2015 Porsche Boxster is about to get a mid-cycle refresh for the 2017 model year, and a new batch of spy shots are giving us our best idea yet of what we can expect. Our photographers recently caught this preproduction prototype driving on the streets of Stuttgart near Porsche headquarters, wearing little more than some transportation protection and foil on the headlamps.

The front fascia has been re-sculpted and appears to jut out more in the lower section. The grill is still partitioned into the three sections, but the middle appears to be blocked off with an optic sensor (likely optional) for assisted driving. The two larger grills on either side now have three horizontal slats instead of two, and redesigned LED strips. The headlights are redesigned too, but unfortunately obscured here.

The new side intakes are the same size, but they’re now surrounded by some new brightwork with two horizontal slats. The door handles are new too.

Moving around to the back we see a pair of redesigned tail lamps with two smaller light housings lower down on the rear fascia. The black lower section has been redesigned too, and, going by this car’s two circular exhaust outlets, this appears to be a Boxster S we’re looking at.

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2016 Mazda Miata VS 2015 Porsche Boxster

2016 Mazda Miata VS 2015 Porsche Boxster

In its 26 years of history until 2015, the Mazda MX-5 Miata saw three generations, several design updates, and numerous engine changes. Conceived as a rear-wheel-drive, compact roadster that was both affordable and fun to drive, the Miata quickly became a hit with sports car enthusiasts and one of the hottest-selling convertibles on the market. For 2016, the Japanese roadster received an extensive overhaul inside and out, along with a new, powerful, yet still fuel-efficient engine.

The fourth-generation Miata came in a time when both the Honda S2000 and Toyota MR2, its traditional rivals, are no longer on the market. With both the Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Sky also gone — along with the brands that sold them — and the Mini Roadster discontinued as of 2015, the Miata is pretty much alone in its niche.

With no other roadster is as affordable as the MX-5, Mazda is now aiming the 2016 Mazda Miata at the 2013-2015 Porsche Boxster, which is both more expensive and significantly more powerful. In the real world, the Miata would be no match for the German. However, Mazda set out to prove that the Boxster isn’t that much better than the Miata in a comparison made by Mazda Parts USA that takes both performance and pricing into account. We decided to add our own input to this virtual test and have a look at the styling and amenities that come with each roadster as well.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Porsche Shows What "Exclusive" Can Do

Porsche Shows What "Exclusive" Can Do

Porsche Exclusive is a great way for Porsche drivers to personalize their new car or SUV, and while the whole point is to make the buyer the designer of their own vehicle, the program also brings some pre-selected goodies to the table. For 2015, Porsche Exclusive has created a full lineup of Porsche cars and SUVs to give a small idea of what types of personalization Porsche customers can experience, but the one that caught our eye was the Porsche Exclusive Boxster S in Guards Red.

If there’s any possibility of Porsche’s Guards Red hue being called subtle, it’s on this Porsche Exclusive Boxster S where the changes require a keen eye. On the outside of the Boxster, Porsche Exclusive has added sportier front and rear fascias from the SportDesign package, and the standard center outlet exhaust looks even better with the rear diffuser.

Other small exterior touches include the tinted taillights, “Boxster S” written on the door, 20-inch five-spoke SportTechno wheels and the painted door mirrors, side vents and roll bars. Inside, the Porsche Exclusive Boxster S gets instrument gauges and a Sport Chrono stopwatch in Guards Red, Alcantara steering wheel and shift lever, leather slats on HVAC vents and carbon accents on the center console, instrument panel and door trim.

Porsche has not said how much the Porsche Exclusive Boxster S models will cost or what their availability will be, but considering these cars are meant to be a showcase of Porsche Exclusive’s unique level of customization, there’s a good bet these cars will be expensive and hard to find. In addition to the Guards Red Porsche Exclusive Boxster S, customers also can opt for this roadster in varying levels of customization painted in Riviera Blue, Racing Yellow and White.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder Caught Testing: Video

Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder Caught Testing: Video

Porsche’s 981 Boxster and Cayman siblings are in for some fairly significant updates for the 2016 model year, and we’re starting to get a pretty good idea of what they will look like, thanks to this brief clip of a new, barely disguised 981 Boxster out for spin in Stuttgart, Germany.

The front gets a resculpted front fascia with what appear to be larger, more squared-off air intakes. The rear fascia gets a refresh too, with a more pronounced black plastic lower section. The elliptical exhaust exit has been ditched in favor of trapezoid-shaped item. This test mule appears to be using headlight and taillight units from the current Boxster, but expect those to be updated as well. However, the biggest news isn’t what on the outside; it’s what’s under the rear deck lid.

That both the next Cayman and Boxster are getting flat-four powerplants isn’t exactly a secret anymore, but Porsche CEO Mathias Mueller recently confirmed to Automotive News that both will indeed be sold in the United States. The new engine will almost certainly be turbocharged, with a 2.0-liter version for the standard Boxster and a 2.5-liter for the Boxster S.

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Porsche Boxster And Cayman Will Get Four-Cylinders Engine In 2016

Porsche Boxster And Cayman Will Get Four-Cylinders Engine In 2016

By mid-2016, Porsche will begin outfitting the Boxster and Cayman with four-cylinder engines, replacing the six-cylinder mills. The confirmation comes after years of rumors and speculation as to what Stuttgart has in store for the two iconic sports cars, with the upcoming refresh for the 2017 model year.

The news comes courtesy of Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller, who spoke with Automotive News recently about the German automaker’s plans for the new engine, saying, “First of all, we will have it in the Boxster and Cayman successor. And then we will see how it works and how successful it is and how the customers will react on that, and then we will take the next decisions.” That leaves the door open for other models in the Porsche lineup to receive the new four-cylinder.

While official details are currently hazy, we do know the pistons will be arranged in a horizontally opposed layout and will probably be boosted by a turbocharger. Expect 2.0-liter and 2.5-liter engines. Output could be as high as 395 horsepower.

That would trump the Boxster Spyder’s 375 horsepower and the Cayman GT4’s 385 horsepower, both of which come from detuned versions of the naturally aspirated 3.8-liter flat-sixes plucked from the 911 Carrera S. 

The last four-cylinder Porsche sold in the U.S. was two decades in the past with the 968 in 1995. The German marque currently sells four-banger versions of the Macan in British and Chinese markets.

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Porsche Trademarks GT5 Name

Porsche Trademarks GT5 Name

Porsche as thus far refused to comment on it, but we now know that the German sports car maker has been given a trademark for the GT5 name. And since there is no official word, that means we get to engage in our favorite gearhead hobby: wild speculation. This seems like it should be a pretty straightforward thing to figure out. Porsche said recently that there will be no GT version of the Panamera, or of any SUV. Moreover, Porsche has a strict brand hierarchy, and since the Boxster slots in under the Cayman and 911, a Boxster GT5 should slot in below the Cayman GT4 and 911 GT3 in the exact same way.

But it might not be that simple. The GT4 and GT3 aren’t arbitrary names; they correspond with FIA classifications for GT racing. There is no FIA GT5, so the moniker won’t correspond with anything, and therefore won’t be locked to any specific sort of car. So even though we’ve been told there won’t be a Panamera GT, there is still the possibility of a Pajun GT5. Or even, unusual as the naming structure would be for Porsche, a 918 GT5.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2016 Porsche Boxster Black Edition

2016 Porsche Boxster Black Edition

Since it redesigned the Boxster for the 2013 model year, Porsche has released a couple of cool versions of its compact roadster. The GTS arrived for 2015 with more power under its belt, while the Spyder came for 2016 as the most powerful Boxster ever built. Now, Stuttgart is rolling out a special-edition model that’s not about unbelievable horsepower, improved lightness or race-bred underpinnings, but a unique exterior appearance Johnny Cash himself would have loved to be photographed with. Meet the Porsche Boxster Black Edition.

If you’re familiar with the latest Boxsters crafted by Porsche’s Exclusive division, then you already know what the Black Edition is all about. Special paint, optional headlamps and wheels and a handful of optional features added as standard. It might not sound like much given Boxster can be customized like never before, but the Black Edition sports that specific look you’re not likely to find in a dealership. Keep reading to find out what makes it special.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Boxster Black Edition.

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2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

Having already showcased the track-focused 2016 Cayman GT4 and 2016 911 GT3 RS at the Geneva Motor Show, Porsche used the 2015 New York Auto Show to unveil the Boxster Spyder. The nameplate returns after a four-year absence as the most powerful and quickest Boxster.

The 2010 Boxster Spyder was first launched at the 2009 Los Angeles Auto Show as a roadster that took inspiration from the 718 Spyder of the 1960s. Essentially identical to its standard sibling from the waist down except for "Spyder" badging, side skirt stripes and lightweight wheels, the Spyder ditched the Boxster’s conventional soft top in favor of a manually operated canvas top. The design also included a pair of roll-over hoops behind the seats, a feature that also harks back to the open-top race cars of the 1960s. Porsche’s aim with the Spyder was to offer a lighter and more powerful Boxster that would sit above the then-range-topping S model. By removing various convenience features and adding a stiffer suspension on top of a 320-horsepower flat-six, Porsche built what would soon become a modern classic.

Can the new Spyder live up to its predecessor’s cult status and does it have what it take to stand out in a lineup that also includes the 911 GT3 and the Cayman GT4? Read on to find out.

Updated 04/15/2015: Porsche dropped a new promo video for its Boxster Spyder, which explains why the car can be described as "unfiltered". Enjoy!

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder.

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Porsche Could Offer Boxster Spyder GT4

Porsche Could Offer Boxster Spyder GT4

When Stuttgart unveiled the new Cayman GT4, performance enthusiasts everywhere went bananas. The two-door sports car embraces a focused approach to driving purity, with a variety of components pulled from the 911 GT3 that make for a vehicle that’s highly capable both on back roads and the race track. Demand for the GT4 is much higher than Porsche expected, so the German automaker is rumored to be considering a GT4 version of the new Boxster Spyder.

“We are looking at it right now,” said an anonymous senior source at Porsche, as reported by the UK-based publication AutoCar. “Much of the engineering has already been done for the Cayman, so we think this might be a good direction for us.”

A new top-range Boxster may crowd Porsche’s catalog slightly, especially considering the minor price disparity between the Spyder and Cayman GT4. However, a roofless GT4 may entice buyers looking for higher speeds combined with unlimited headroom. 

The same 3.8-liter flat-six engine shoehorned into the Cayman GT4 can currently be found in the Boxster Spyder. Upgraded equipment for a Boxster GT4 would probably include adjustable suspension components and brakes pilfered from the GT3 parts bin. The aerodynamics package would also most likely get an aggressive refresh.

Continue reading to learn more about the future possible Porsche Boxster Spyder GT4.

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Alfa Romeo 4C Spider Vs. Porsche Boxster

Alfa Romeo 4C Spider Vs. Porsche Boxster

Alfa Romeo has slowly but surely become a shadow of its former self after Fiat took over the helm in 1986, but the little Italian carmaker that could is planning a return to its past glory. The first step was a relaunch of the Alfa Romeo brand in the U.S. - currently with just one model, the sexy little 4C. Since the 4C coupe was more than once pitted against the Porsche Cayman, the newly unveiled 4C Spider can only go against the Cayman’s open-top brother, the Boxster.

Both the 4C Spider and the Boxster are mid-engine, lightweight, and have similar specifications, with the higher power of the Porsche being compensated for by the lower weight of the Alfa. But they are still very different, so I decided to see which of the two would come on top when their features are examined closely.

Continue reading to learn which model we like better: the Alfa Romeo 4C Spyder or the Porsche Boxster.

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Porsche Confirms New Boxster Spyder Is Coming

Porsche Confirms New Boxster Spyder Is Coming

We’re barely past the first quarter and 2015 already seems to be the year of Porsche, at least when it comes to the introduction of new models. With the 2015 Geneva Motor Show bringing us the mighty 911 GT3 RS and the analog Cayman GT4, Porsche has now confirmed that a new Boxster Spyder is also on the way later this year. The confirmation doesn’t exactly come as a surprise though, since preproduction prototypes of the model have been caught by spy cameras for months.

Set to pack a flat-six engine that may be close in horsepower to the Cayman GT4’s 385, the 2016 Boxster Spyder should be yet another delight for old-school enthusiasts, especially since it is also expected that the only transmission available will be a six-speed manual. The model’s name isn’t confirmed though, as Porsche may choose to call it the RS Spyder as a tribute to some of its past no-nonsense sports cars.

Sporting a soft top that harks back to the roadsters of old, the upcoming Spyder will have a minimalist interior and as few creature comforts as possible, with the main focus being put on razor-sharp handling and a more pronounced driver involvement. Porsche may even go as far as leaving aside essential features like an audio or infotainment system for the standard version. There is no official ETA for the car, but a 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show unveiling is not out of the question.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Boxster Spyder.

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Porsche Boxster Will Get a Hardcore Version in 2016

Porsche Boxster Will Get a Hardcore Version in 2016

One of the coolest versions of the Porsche Boxster since the car’s debut almost 20 years ago is easily the 2011 Porsche Boxster RS Spyder. With a simple focus on weight savings, the Boxster Spyder was even more fun to drive than the Boxster S and was arguably better looking, too. Well, it sounds like Porsche is getting ready to launch a new version of Boxster in a similar vein as the Spyder with a reduced curb weight as well as some improved suspension components for improved handling.

According to AutoCar, this new Porsche model will benefit from many of the reduced curb weight and chassis tuning tactics being developed for the upcoming Cayman GT4, but it will not see any increase over the Boxster GTS’ 325-horsepower output. While few details exist about this car, Wolfgang Hatz, Porsche’s head of research and development, has said that it will not wear the GT4 moniker. AutoCar is speculating that Porsche could revive the Club Sport name for this new Boxster model – an idea that seems to make even more sense following Porsche’s recent introduction of the 911 Club Coupe.

Spy shots show that whatever this new Boxster is called, it will wear a more aggressive body including a new front fascia, larger side air intakes and new V-spoke wheels. Pricing would almost certainly be above the $73,500 price tag of the current Boxster GTS, but we probably won’t know for sure until the car officially goes on sale sometime in 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about Porsche’s future Boxster version.

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Next-Generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman Will be Renamed 718

Next-Generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman Will be Renamed 718

So Porsche’s plan to develop an entry-level sports car to be called the 718 is dead. Porsche head of R&D Dr. Wolfgang Hatz made that clear to Autocar. But just because the project itself has gone to the scrap heap, that doesn’t mean the “718” nomenclature went with it. A new report from Automobile Magazine is now suggesting that instead of building a completely new entry level-model and call it the 718, Porsche is now planning on using the name on the next-generation Boxster and Cayman models.

Noted auto journalist and Automobile Mag’s European bureau chief Georg Kacher disclosed these new developments, saying that the 718 will be used similar to how Porsche uses the 911 to represent a slew of models that fall under its name. The same thing will be applied in this case for the Boxster and Cayman, giving way to a family of new Porsche Boxster and Cayman models under the 718 name.

According to Kacher, Porsche will still use its new four-cylinder engine for this lineup, specifically in low-range models that are being tapped to make up the entry-level versions of the 718. Likewise, a number of four-cylinders with different displacements will be used on other versions of the 718, including the possibility of a turbocharged 718 that will sit as the range-topper of the entire line.

With the arrival of the four-cylinder engine, it’s likely that Porsche will have no place for the six-cylinder engines that the Boxster and Cayman currently use.

So basically, the 718 is still alive, albeit packaged in a different way than Porsche originally intended. The first derivative of this new line could arrive in 2016.

Click past the jump to read more about the next-generation Porsche Boxster/Cayman.

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2016 Porsche Boxster GT4

2016 Porsche Boxster GT4

Porsche has received a lot of criticism in recent years for not letting the Boxster and Cayman models live up to their potential. It’s a well known fact that in order to protect the iconic 911, the Germans have been keeping their entry-level models from becoming too powerful. Fortunately, that’s about to end once the current Cayman receives its mid-cycle update in 2016, as the mid-engined coupe is set to receive a GT4 version similar to the GT3 package the 911 has had since 1999. As 2014 comes to an end, there’s more good news coming from Stuttgart, in the form of what appears to be a GT4-spec Boxster. While Porsche has yet to confirm such a roadster is underway, a new Boxster prototype that surfaced in Germany suggests the drop-top sports car could be in for a similar update.

We should find out more about that in the first half of 2015, but if the Boxster GT4 is indeed on its way, it is likely to arrive in dealerships for the 2016 model year as the most powerful and most track-focused Boxster yet. Meanwhile, read on to find out what we know so far about the roadster that’s set to climb above the GTS as the range-topping Boxster.

Updated 12/16/2014: Based on the recent spy shots, we created a rendering for the future Boxster GT4. Check it out after the jump.

Click past the jump yo read more about the 2016 Porsche Boxster GT4.

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Video: Porsche Returns to the Nurburgring With Four-Cylinder Prototypes

Video: Porsche Returns to the Nurburgring With Four-Cylinder Prototypes

The folks over at Porsche are definitely up to something these days at the Nurburgring track, as two more prototypes have joined the 911 Convertible and the Cayenne GTS for extensive testing on the track. This time around, the Germans were spotted hooning a couple of mid-engined Boxster and Cayman sports cars. Although both look like plain, flat-six-powered vehicles from the company’s current lineup, there’s more to these black-painted Porsches. And it all comes down to the engine note bursting from those center-mounted exhaust pipes.

Both cars sound different than any Boxster and Cayman we’ve heard up until now, and this can only mean one thing: Porsche is these shells and chassis to test its upcoming four-cylinder engines. Stuttgart has already confirmed there’s a flat-four underway, but the Germans have declined to reveal further details. We expect the new powerplants to arrive in the facelifted versions of the current Boxster and Cayman. Three different units are rumored to emerge, with 1.6-, 2.0-, and 2.5-liter displacements. Each of them will be accompanied by turbochargers, with ouput to range between 210 and 360 horsepower.

There’s no indication as to how big the engines hidden in these test cars are, but they do sound quite impressive under full throttle. Combine that with a hefty reduction in CO2 emission, improved fuel efficiency and a lower curb weight, and the result is downright impressive. All of a sudden downsizing sounds like a terrific idea! Hit the play button and tell us what you think.

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TopSpeed Podcast Episode 019 LIVE

TopSpeed Podcast Episode 019 LIVE

It was a day early, but we hope you enjoyed this week’s episode of the TopSpeed Podcast. There was the usual bit of silliness, a fair amount of arguing and we even managed to talk about some car stuff.

As always, we want to say a very special thanks to our live viewers.

For Weekly Wheels, I discuss my time with the Prius V, Mark talks to us about what he thinks I got wrong with the Lexus RX 450h, and Justin tells us how much he liked the new 2015 Honda Fit.

For news stories we cover the new fourth-generation Miata engine and reveal date, talk about Mercedes bringing back the Maybach name, and we cover our exclusive news of Kahn Design moving into car production.

After that we spend some time with Mark talking about the 100-year anniversary of Dodge, how they are celebrating with a 707 horsepower Challenger, and end with a look at the future of the rock-crawling Jeep Wrangler. To finish the news, I had a few things to say about a faster Alfa Romeo 4C and looked at how you can buy a cheap Porsche Boxster or Cayman next summer.

For our viewer-question segment we talk about cars that can do epic burnouts, cars we want to see do epic burnouts and then we talk about racing video games. With the video games we take a second to look at our all-time favorite games and touch on the games that are coming out in the next six to nine months. There is even a sneak peak at a new piece I am working on.

To end the show we do our traditional Own, Drive, Burn and it was easily the hardest one we had yet. We have to choose between a legendary classic Porsche, Ferrari and Lamborghini.

If you liked the show, let us know in the comments. If you didn’t like the show, let us know that too. Apart from the comments, you can reach us on Twitter @TopSpeedPodcast or by email, Podcast@TopSpeed.com. Don’t forget, if you like the show but can’t always make it the to site to watch or listen, you can subscribe to our cast on iTunes.

Stay safe this weekend, and we will see you guys next week.

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2013 - 2015 Porsche Boxster

2013 - 2015 Porsche Boxster

Porsche has spent years working on the 911, but while that might be its ultimate sports car, the Boxster is one of its best sellers. When the Boxster debuted in 1997, enthusiasts first saw it as a disgrace to the Porsche name, as it was smaller and not as powerful as the iconic 911. The second-gen Boxster hit the market for the 2015 model year with a light nip-and-tuck job on the exterior and a huge overhaul on the inside. In 2013, the third-gen Boxster arrived with another evolutionary change to the body and a revised cabin. This look carries into the 2015 model year with only minor changes.

The Boxster and its hardtop sibling, the Cayman, are now an accepted part of the Porsche family. In fact, some enthusiasts consider them better driving than the 911, thanks to their mid-mounted engine, as opposed to the 911’s rear-mounted unit.

This belief that the Boxster may be a better driver was only compounded with the release of the GTS model for 2014. This model gained 20-inch wheels, Porsche Active Suspension Management and the Sport Chrono package. Oh, and I almost forgot that the GTS gained an extra 35 horses and 7 pound-feet of twist to go with its better handling.

Updated 07/03/2014: Porsche announced a series of upgrades for the 2015 Boxster which is now on sale. Changes include new exterior colors, new two-tone leather and a series of new options.

Hit the jump to read more on the Porsche Boxster.

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2014 Porsche Boxster S in Riviera Blue by Porsche Exclusive

2014 Porsche Boxster S in Riviera Blue by Porsche Exclusive

The age of customized and personalized vehicles is alive and strong. In fact, many manufacturers have taken this route to ensure a level of uniqueness for their customers. One such automaker is Porsche, and judging by how it spruced up this Boxster S in a sparkling in blue, you can tell that the German automaker’s Porsche Exclusive program is doing quite well on its own.

There aren’t a lot of wholesale changes made to this Boxster S to make it look completely new. On the contrary, it’s full of subtle modifications that all add up to an incredible visual treat, the kind that customers will definitely want to get their hands on.

The Porsche Exclusive options fitted into this sports roadster includes a the new Riviera Blue paint job that is nicely complemented by doses of black on the exterior mirrors, the headlight cleaning system covers, the rear side air intake grilles, the "Boxster S" graphics on the doors. All these new trimmings were specifically modified to give a smooth blue-and-black look to the Boxster S, and yes, they do bring out a new level of sporty aggression to the baby Porsche, don’t they?

There is a handful of other upgrades to this particular Boxster S, details of which you can check out after the jump.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Boxster S in Riviera Blue by Porsche Exclusive.

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2015 Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder

2015 Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder

Well we know it is coming, but we finally have the first solid, rolling evidence of the new four-cylinder Porsche Boxster.

Our spy photographers have captured a new mule doing the rounds at the Nürburgring. While there are no visual cues that this taped up convertible is only running on four-cylinders, our spies report that the exhaust note was anything but the traditional flat-six wail the usually exits the rear of the Porsche.

While there have been some rumors that the upcoming four-banger Porsche may be using a more traditional in-line design engine than a flat-four setup, our spies were only able to catch it for two laps, so there was not enough listening time accurately gauge the engine note.

Beyond the engine note, this appears to be a fairly standard Porsche Boxster with some tape and sensors collecting loads of fancy data for the German engineers to salivate over.

If you ever really doubted all of Porsche’s plans to bring a four-cylinder car to market, this should finally put all those doubts to rest. We may even get shots of the new four-banger Cayman soon as well.

Expect to see a full announcement before the end of the year, with an on-sale date early in 2015.

Click past the jump for more photos of the new Porsche Boxster

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A 2014 Porsche Cayman S and the Blue Ridge Parkway Equal Perfection

A 2014 Porsche Cayman S and the Blue Ridge Parkway Equal Perfection

Few companies cater to the petrol-head quite like Porsche. Sure Ferrari provides excitement, and Lamborghini is the maestro of theater, but Porsche has cornered the market on feel and precision.

Beyond that, Porsche also seems to demonstrate a peculiar, un-German ability to create cars that are very pretty. Not the sensual beauty the Italians have mastered, but still pretty.

Late last year the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh decided that Porsche had done so much in the field of design, that it deserved to be recognized. They then began the laborious task of collecting an eclectic assortment of metal from the brand’s storied history; from the Type 64 of 1938 up to the 911 GTS R Hybrid race car.

As a man with a slight fetish for German autos, the exhibit intrigued me. The NCMA is only a six-hour drive from my house, through some of the most beautiful roads and scenery in the U.S., and I had just been granted the keys to a 2014 Porsche Cayman S.

It was a recipe that sounded like a Porsche enthusiast’s perfect weekend.

Read on to find out more about my journey, the Cayman S and the NCMA exhibit.

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2015 Porsche Boxster GTS

2015 Porsche Boxster GTS

The Porsche Boxster S and its hardtop twin the Cayman S are formidable sports cars with a capable engine, well-engineered transmissions, and enough track presence to out maneuver a majority of its competition. However, Porsche is pushing for more with the introduction of the souped-up GTS version of each car.

The GTS package simply brings more good stuff to the table. More power from the 3.4-liter flat-six engine, better handling thanks to revised suspension components, and a unique exterior appearance separating the GTS version from the less S models and lesser base Boxster and Cayman cars.

Diving into the details of the Boxster reveals an added 15 horsepower and 7 pound-feet of torque, bringing the total to 330 horses and 273 pound-feet. Porsche’s Sport Chrono package and Active Suspension Management (PASM) come with the package as well. Dynamic engine mounts, selectable damper stiffness, and throttle response are all modified at the push of a button. Put everything in sport mode, and a PDK-equipped Boxster will hit 62 mph in 4.7 seconds. For those who’d rather row their own gears, Porsche is offering the six-speed manual in the GTS, though its performance suffers a few tenths. Also optional are carbon ceramic brakes along with Porsche Torque Vectoring, the latter of which utilizes the brakes and a locking differential to control how torque is applied to the ground.

Separating the GTS from the lesser Boxsters are a number of GTS badges, including one on the headrest of the Alcantara-appointed sport seats. Like other GTS models, Alcantara is heavily used. The steering wheel, headliner, and center console are all covered in it. Blacked-out 20-inch wheels are unique as well as they match the subdued headlight surrounds.

Updated 03/24/2014: Porsche unveiled a new video showing the new Boxster GTS in action. Enjoy!

Click past the jump for the full rundown on the 2014 Porsche Boxster GTS

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Next-Gen Porsche Boxster and Cayman will Get a 395-Horsepower, 4-Cylinder Engine

Next-Gen Porsche Boxster and Cayman will Get a 395-Horsepower, 4-Cylinder Engine

There’s a lot of news coming out of Stuttgart these days, as Porsche has revealed a multitude of new developments regarding its future engine lineup. One, in particular, that has gathered a lot of steam is the recent confirmation coming from CEO Matthias Mueller that both the Porsche Boxster and Porsche Cayman are in line to receive a new 395-horsepower, four-cylinder engine.

Speaking with Auto Motor und Sport, Mueller the Porsche CEO specifically singled out the Boxster and the Cayman as two cars that will follow in this strategic downsizing of engines. Both models won’t receive the same four-cylinder as the 919 Hybrid because that one was specially modified for that particular vehicle.

Instead, the Boxster and the Cayman are expected to receive a new four-cylinder boxer engine that will reflect the company’s new engine direction, a strategy Mueller indicated was done to adhere to increasing industry practice of being more eco-friendly.

“We will not separate ourselves from efforts to reduce CO2,” the Porsche CEO said.

Mueller did not point to an exact number as far as the output that could be produced from these new four-cylinders, although he did say that the turbocharged engine could have in excess of 395 horsepower under its hood. That’s a significant increase from the current 3.4-liter, normally aspirated six-cylinder that powers the Boxster and Cayman, good enough to hit "only" 335 horsepower.

This, combined with the new GTS versions of the Boxter and Cayman, point toward just how important these two models are in Porsche’s future. These once-looked-down-upon models are primed to lead Porsche into the next generation of compact sports cars.

Click past the jump to read more about the new Porsche Cayman GTS.

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Range-Topping Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS Make Their Debut

Range-Topping Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS Make Their Debut

They’re finally here, folks, the Boxster and Cayman GTS. Let’s not beat around the bush, and we’ll dive right into the stuff that you really want to read about. Under the hoods of these two models is an updated 3.4-liter six-pot that pumps out an extra 15 horsepower. This puts the Boxster GTS at 330 horsepower and the Cayman GTS at 340 ponies. Each model also gained 10 Nm (7 pound-feet) of torque, driving them to 280 pound-feet in the Cayman and 273 pound-feet in the Boxster.

Both models come standard with a six-speed manual transmission and the Sport Chrono package. Optional on both models is the PDK transmission with the Sport Plus button. With the optional gearbox in place, the Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS hit 100 km/h (62 mph) in 4.7 and 4.6 seconds, respectively. With the manual transmission, the Cayman hits 285 km/h (177 mph) and the soft-top Boxster hits 281 km/h (175 mph). On top of this impressive performance, the newest additions to the GTS lineup are both Euro 6 compliant and have a fuel consumption rating of 8.2 l/100 km.

Keeping the new GTS models stable in the twist PASM, 235/35R20 and 265/35R20 on the front and rear, respectively, wrapped around Carrera S wheels.

The Boxster and Cayman GTS will hit dealers in May 2014 and will sit at the very top of their respective lineups. They won’t come cheap either, as the Boxster GTS checks in at €69,949 ($97,306 at the current exchange rates) and the Cayman comes in at €73,757 ($102,603), respectively, in Germany.

We have full reviews of both models in progress now, so stay tuned to TopSpeed to read all about the new GTS model.

Click past the jump to see some comparisons between the standard Boxster and Cayman, and the new GTS models.

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2013 Porsche Boxster S RED 7

2013 Porsche Boxster S RED 7

Until now, the new-generation Porsche Boxster hasn’t had a special edition released, but the first one has been announced today and it comes from Netherlands. This special model is called Red 7 and, as you probably have guessed it by its name, it is all about the color red and will be limited to only seven units.

The model has been designed by Porsche Exclusive Course and features a very cool Indian Red exterior paint combined with matte Platinum on the hood and trunk lid. The interior combines very cool black leather with Guard Red inserts and a special "personally built for 7" logo. Each customer will also get a matching protective cover and a coffee-table book with photos of the production process.

The new Red 7 will also be offered with a sports suspension that lowers the car’s ride and a sports exhaust system.

Hit the jump to read more about the standard Porsche Boxster.

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