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Porsche GT3

2018 Porsche 911 GT3

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Exterior
- image 710291
  • Porsche 911 GT3
  • Year:
    2018
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Model:
  • Engine:
    flat-6
  • Transmission:
    PDK
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    500 @ 8250
  • Torque @ RPM:
    339
  • Displacement:
    4.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    3.2 sec.
  • Top Speed:
    198 mph
  • car segment:
  • body style:

The manual transmission returns!

Sold out since early 2015, the current-generation Porsche 911 GT3 has finally returned into dealerships with updates similar to the 991.2 911. Unveiled at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, the track-prepped 911 is making a comeback after nearly two years with revised styling, a retuned chassis, and more importantly a new drivetrain.

Not surprisingly, the race-bred coupe didn’t change much inside and out, and most of the new stuff is borrowed from the regular 911 that was upgraded in 2016. However, the revised chassis brings new dynamics, while the troublesome 3.8-liter flat-six was replaced by the slightly bigger, 4.0-liter unit from the GT3 Cup race car and the range-topping GT3 RS. The really big news about the new 911 GT3 is that Porsche finally brought the manual transmission back, giving enthusiasts a new reason to celebrate.

Developed on the same test track and manufactured on the same production line as the 911 race cars, the GT3 returns to a market that has a brand-new competitor, the Mercedes-AMG GT R. Launched in 2016, the AMG GT R is the first track-prepped car to actually compete in the same niche, something that hasn’t happened in quite a few years. Will the 911 GT3 continue to dominate this demanding segment? Let’s find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Porsche 911 GT3.

230 photos / 2 videos

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Germany’s latest track-toy is here, and it’s pretty fast!

Launched in 2015, the 991-generation GT3 RS was a significant update over the GT3 and a big departure from the previous car design-wise, having borrowed base bodywork from the Turbo model. On the other hand, the 4.0-liter inline-six was pretty much identical to the 997-generation GT3 RS 4.0 model, as was the 500-horsepower output, a bit of letdown for those expecting a more powerful car. This minor inconvenience was fixed with the upgraded GT3 RS, which gained a more potent engine now that the standard GT3 has been updated to the same 4.0-liter mill. Set to make its public debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the 991.2 GT3 RS might just be the last naturally aspirated GT3 model.

Unleashed on public roads in early 2017 as a prototype, the new GT3 RS isn’t exactly new. Heavily based on the GT3, it shares many features with its non-RS sibling and it takes a closer look to spot the differences inside and out. But it’s the engine that sets the RS apart thanks to an extra 20 horsepower, as well as the fact that you can’t get it with a manual transmission. The chassis setup is also different, so the RS is bound to be quicker on the race track. Just don’t expect it to be very different on the outside. Let’s find out more about that below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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The Porsche 911 GT3 RS Configurator is Online and Boy Does it Have Some Crazy Options

The Porsche 911 GT3 RS Configurator is Online and Boy Does it Have Some Crazy Options

Lizard Green everything!

There was a time when online configurators for new cars took a few days (or even weeks) to become available. That’s a thing of past now, especially when talking about sports cars. Performance vehicles from Porsche, Ferrari, and Lamborghini don’t spend too much time in showrooms, and it’s exactly why customers are given the opportunity to customize their ride as soon as the first official details are out. It’s been just a few hours since the updated Porsche 911 GT3 RS was launched and you can already configure your dream model. Ready to have some fun?

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Word Has it that the Next Porsche 911 GT3 Will go Turbo, PDK Only, and Deliver 550 Ponies

Word Has it that the Next Porsche 911 GT3 Will go Turbo, PDK Only, and Deliver 550 Ponies

Sing a ballad for what looks like the last 911 GT3 to feature a naturally aspirated engine

The exodus away from naturally aspirated engines appears to have claimed another soul. We’ve already lost our fair share of sports cars and supercars that have crossed over to the land of turbos, and now, according to Motor Australia, we may lose another titan in the form of the next-generation Porsche 911 GT3. While there hasn’t been any confirmation from Stuttgart, the report claims that the “992” 911 GT3 — that’s the next-generation model — will ditch its current 4.0-liter six-cylinder engine in favor of a turbocharged flat-six. If that’s not bad enough, the same report says that the next-gen 911 GT3 will use an eight-speed PDK transmission. As for a manual box? Well, we might be lighting a candle for that one, too.

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Hulk-Green 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Leaks Prior to Debut

Hulk-Green 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Leaks Prior to Debut

20 extra horsepower and new aerodynamics

The Porsche 911 GT2 RS may be the hottest sports car the German automaker has launched in 2017, but a revised version of the 911 GT3 RS is just around the corner. And based on a handful of photos that just surfaced the Interwebz, it’s just as exciting. Spotted testing many times last year, the facelifted GT3 RS is set to arrive sometime in 2018. An official date isn’t yet available, but this leak confirms that we’re just a couple of weeks — if not days — away from seeing it in the metal.

The photos were first posted by Australia’s Drive, but they have since been removed. Fortunately, the folks over at Motor1 managed to save them, and we can now have a closer at the upcoming GT3 RS. And it’s finished in a bright share of green that reminds me of old first-generation 911 models. So, what’s new? Read on to find out.

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Looking For A Porsche 911 GT3? How Does A Fleet Of 18 Never-Driven Examples Sound?

Looking For A Porsche 911 GT3? How Does A Fleet Of 18 Never-Driven Examples Sound?

No worries if you stuff it, there’s plenty to spare...

We like the Porsche 911 GT3 – quite a lot, actually. It’s purposefully built, looks great, and goes like stink. However, this classified ad seeking a buyer for 18 fresh in-the-box examples looks to be a whole new level of devotion to the Stuttgart superstar.

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

Porsche gives birth to a purist-focused 911 that we can all get our hands on

Say what you will about Porsche’s tendency to get a little carried away with its niche variants for the 911, but credit should be heaped on the company for being aware of what customers want. Take the Porsche 911 GT3 for example. By every sports car metric, the 911 GT3 is a shining example of the best of Stuttgart engineering. The only problem with it is that it’s far from being the most understated 911 in the market, no thanks to its attention-grabbing aero bits. Then there’s the 911 R, the answer to prayers coming from Porsche purists who were crossing their fingers for a manual transmission 911. The 911 R was the answer to those prayers, except it was limited to just 991 units. Enter then the Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package. Think of it as the love child between the 911 GT3 and the 911 R, carrying elements from both models and wrapping them all up in one scintillating package.

The car’s name may not roll off the tongue as smoothly as I’d like, but remember, there is a precedence in Porsche’s history of the “Touring” name being used on a 911, specifically the 1973 Porsche Carrera 911 RS Touring. So we’ve established the roots of the 911 GT3 Touring. But far more than just being a product of Porsches-gone-by and previous iterations of the current-generation 911, the 911 GT3 Touring is a car of its own devices, understated in appearance yet ferocious in performance. In my view, this is the Porsche 911 variant that purists have been waiting for.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

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Latest Geneva Motor Show:

Porsche 911 GT3 Goes Stealth Mode In Frankfurt

Porsche 911 GT3 Goes Stealth Mode In Frankfurt

New Touring package keeps the good stuff, dials back visuals

With its enormous rear wing and track-bred attitude, the Porsche 911 GT3 is not traditionally the sort of car you want if you’re looking to fly under the radar. Now, however, Porsche is offering a stealthier alternative in the form of the new Touring package for its high-strung two-door. Following in the foot steps of the updated 2018 911 GT3 introduced earlier this year at the Geneva Motor Show, the Touring package promises a purist’s approach to going quick. For starters, the old look-at-me aero in back was replaced with a far more understated trailing lip, drawing its design inspiration from the 911 Carrera. Inside, there’s oodles of leather added everywhere. What’s more, the GT3 Touring is only offered with a six-speed manual transmission. Cue enthusiast celebration.

This latest Touring Package is a nod to the past equipment package offered on the 1973 Carrera RS, but adds a touch of modernization on top. “This variant is aimed at fans of high-quality sports cars who particularly value an understated appearance and classic driving enjoyment,” says Porsche. The GT3 Touring Package is offered in conjunction with practically every other option on the 911 GT3 table, with the exception of the Clubsport and Alcantara lines. That means the branded ceramic brakes, Chrono Package, wheel options, and similar stuff is all fair game. The Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Package is available now for 152,416 euros in Germany, or $143,600 in the U.S., matching prices for the standard model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Package.

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Have Wing, Will Travel – The History of the Porsche 911 GT3

Have Wing, Will Travel – The History of the Porsche 911 GT3

Tracing the evolution of one of Stuttgart’s finest

To many, the Porsche 911 is the quintessential sports car, offering the perfect balance of grip, feel, downforce, and power. This is not a model for the timid or the foolish – the rear-engine, RWD drivetrain layout will quickly turn on any driver unfamiliar with handling eager rotation, and the output produced by the right pedal is more than enough to get you into big trouble in no time at all. But while the standard 911 is certainly an impressive machine, it’s the high-spec variants the truly make the nameplate shine. Enter the 911 GT3, a modern interpretation of the formula originally laid out by the legendarily good 911 Carrera RS. The specs on the GT3 read like a how-to for enthusiast cars – it’s lightweight, stripped down, and no nonsense, with a high-revving naturally aspirated powerplant behind the driver and even the option for a manual gearbox. The terms “track ready” and “race proven” come readily to mind.

The end result for the pilot is an extremely pure driving experience, like the distilled essence of performance, a machine that still feels mechanical, eager, and challenging. Not only that, but the GT3 is still driveable on the street, presenting relatively few issues when doing normal, everyday “car stuff.” And it’s for these reasons you can call us fans. Read on for a little background and history, as well as the facts and figures behind the badge.

Continue reading to learn more about the history behind the Porsche 911 GT3.

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You Won't Be Able To Take Your Eyes Away From The Sight Of A Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS Crashing

You Won’t Be Able To Take Your Eyes Away From The Sight Of A Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS Crashing

A Lego Porsche subjected to a scaled down crash test makes for a great viewing experience

There’s nothing more heartbreaking than to see a car like the Porsche 911 GT3 RS get turned into a crumpled heap. Fortunately, this video isn’t as jarring to the senses, at least if you take it in stride. See, it’s not an actual 911 GT3 RS that was used in this extraordinary video, but a Lego Technic 911 GT3 RS. There’s something mesmerizing about the Lego 911 GT3 RS barreling toward a wall in a scaled-down crash test simulated to the same standard as the Euro NCAP 40-percent offset test.

As you might expect, the results weren’t pretty. The crash is loud and scary in real time, but the real treat in this video is the slow-motion footage of the crash, which was captured by several high-speed cameras at a speed of 1,000 frames per second. The slow-motion build-up to the moment of contact is nerve-wracking and once the car meets the wall, all hell breaks loose as Lego pieces fly all over the place, including three of the car’s four wheels. The car’s rear-end even elevates off the ground from the sheer force of impact as other Lego pieces scatter around it. The result is both spectacular and devastating, kind of like the feeling of seeing $300 go to waste in a blink of an eye. Then again, it’s not my Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS that got completely annihilated here. Mine’s sitting pretty on my shelf, so this video didn’t break my heart as much as I thought it would. It’s still awesome to watch, although prepare yourselves to cringe while watching it.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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Porsche to Restrict sales to Known Resellers of Limited-Production Models

Porsche to Restrict sales to Known Resellers of Limited-Production Models

If you’re a car flipper, you might get denied

A lot of people have a side hustle. Some people buy things on the cheap and resell them online. Others buy broken down used cars, repair them, and sell them for a profit. The latter is a form of car flipping, and it’s a relatively cheap way to make a little extra cash if you know what you’re doing. When you have deeper pockets, however, flipping cars is about buying limited-production models like the Porsche 911 GT3 or the Ford GT, letting them sit until demand and value go up, then selling them for huge profits. Well, Porsche has had enough of the practice and will begin vetting buyers of its limited-production GT models.

In an interview with Car & Driver at the launch of the 2018 911 GT3, Andreas Preuninger – the Head of GT Road Car Development at Porsche – said, “I personally like to see my cars being used. That’s what we build them for. They are just too good to be left to stand and collect dust. I don’t like this business of people buying our cars to make money on them. That was never our intention. The purpose of limiting a car is not for it to gain value. We don’t want to be laying money on each car’s roof when they run out of the factory.”

Keep reading for the rest of the story

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Is 12.3 Seconds Faster Than Its Predecessor On the Nurburgring

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Is 12.3 Seconds Faster Than Its Predecessor On the Nurburgring

Second-quickest Porsche on the German track

The previous-generation Porsche 911 GT3 became famous for many things, and one of them was its blistering quick Nurburgring lap. But sports cars have a come a long way since 2011, and the 911 that once was among the fastest vehicles around the "Green Hell" is far from impressive six years later. But come 2017 and Porsche upgraded the GT3’s "Ring lap with the latest iteration of the coupe, and it’s as impressive as they get.

Updated to 991.2 specs, the new 911 GT3 gained better aerodynamics, 25 horsepower, and 15 pound-feet of torque. As a result, Porsche was able to improve the nameplate’s Nurburgring time quite dramatically, shaving no fewer than 12.3 seconds off the previous GT3’s benchmark. Specifically, the track-ready 911 lapped the "Green Hell" in seven minutes and 12.7 seconds, which makes it the second-fastest Porsche on the track after the 918 Spyder supercar.

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DriveTribe Takes It To 9,000 RPM In The New Porsche 911 GT3: Video

DriveTribe Takes It To 9,000 RPM In The New Porsche 911 GT3: Video

A proper test of Germany’s greatest export

Although Jeremy Clarkson contends it’s a Beetle and was therefore designed by Hitler, we all know the truth – the Porsche 911 is in actuality a true-blue track weapon capable of mass lap time destruction. One of the latest (and fastest) iterations is the 991.2 GT3, a facelifted apex-hunter that was bred and designed for one very clear purpose: domination in the world of speed. As such, it’s got more aero, a larger engine, a retuned suspension, and a few other tweaks to make it even better than it was before. But how much better is it really? DriveTribe’s Editor-at-Large, Jethro Bovingdon, decided to find out, and took the new GT3 to the Anglesey race circuit for some first-hand, foot-down, ass-out research.

In this in-depth eight-minute, 41-second video review, Bovingdon does an excellent job in pushing the Stuttgart superstar above and beyond the limit, all while narrating the experience for the viewer’s benefit. And while it’s undeniably entertaining to watch the Porsche slide around the racetrack, the biggest turn on has to be the sound of four liters and 500 horsepower wailing away at 9,000 rpm.

Of course it doesn’t hurt that the reviewer seems to know what he’s doing behind the wheel, and has plenty of info to relay while crossed up in the corners. If you like Porsches and gorgeous-looking track vids, then grab the headphones, hit full screen, and press play.

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Is Porsche Working on a Successor to the Awesome 911 R?

Is Porsche Working on a Successor to the Awesome 911 R?

This wingless GT3 suggests that the answer is YES!

With Porsche having already launched a GT3 version of the updated 991.2-gen 911, it’s safe to assume that a new GT3 RS is also underway . We might even get a new GT2 RS before the current 911 is discontinued, but is seems that Porsche may have at least one more version in the works. Our skilled paparazzi just spotted a wingless 911 GT3 on the Nurburgring and we might be looking at a successor for the 911 R.

Surprisingly for an upcoming model, Porsche didn’t bother to cover the important bits in camouflage. With everything in sight, it’s easy to observe that the coupe is based on the new GT3 and sports identical bumpers, wheels, lights, and exhaust pipes. The big wing on the engine lid is the most important element that’s missing, but upon closer inspection I found other elements that are different when compared to the GT3. There are no radiator scoops and the engine lid now features the vertical-slat grille seen on the regular 911.

So how do I know this is a new 911 R?

Continue reading for the full story.

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You Can Now Configure The Porsche 911 GT3 Of Your Dreams

You Can Now Configure The Porsche 911 GT3 Of Your Dreams

Go wild!

Priced from $143,600 before options and delivery, the Porsche 911 GT3 isn’t exactly an affordable sports car. But, even though most of us can’t afford one, it doesn’t mean we can’t dream about taking a GT3 home some day. And the configurator for the new 911 GT3 is here to encourage you to do just that by designing the sports car of your dreams.

Although not as customizable as other high-profile supercars, the new 911 GT3 comes with plenty of options inside and out. The exterior can now be ordered in several colors, including the Lava Orange that Porsche introduced on the GT3 RS and Miami Blue, a light shade of blue with a hint of turquoise. These colors, alongside the familiar Carmine Red and Chalk, are the most expensive, being priced from $4,220. The metallic range, which includes seven options, including Graphite Blue and Sapphire blue, costs $720. If you’re looking to save some cash, you can go with the four, no-cost standard colors - black, white, Guards Red, and Racing Yellow.

Moving over to wheels, the 911 GT3 is restricted to a set of 20-inch, double-twin-spoke rims. However, they can be finished in either satin aluminum, satin platinum, satin black, and satin black with a Guards Red outer lip. These options cost $1,220, while the red lip adds another $700.

More customization is possible via Porsche Exclusive, which offers a range of exterior options such as painted logos and lettering, black headlamps with PDLS, body-colored side skirts, gloss black door handles and lower mirror caps, carbon-fiber upper mirror caps, and aluminum look fuel cap. The black headlamps are the most expensive at $2,900, while the carbon mirrors fetch $1,420.

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3

2018 Porsche 911 GT3

The manual transmission returns!

Sold out since early 2015, the current-generation Porsche 911 GT3 has finally returned into dealerships with updates similar to the 991.2 911. Unveiled at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, the track-prepped 911 is making a comeback after nearly two years with revised styling, a retuned chassis, and more importantly a new drivetrain.

Not surprisingly, the race-bred coupe didn’t change much inside and out, and most of the new stuff is borrowed from the regular 911 that was upgraded in 2016. However, the revised chassis brings new dynamics, while the troublesome 3.8-liter flat-six was replaced by the slightly bigger, 4.0-liter unit from the GT3 Cup race car and the range-topping GT3 RS. The really big news about the new 911 GT3 is that Porsche finally brought the manual transmission back, giving enthusiasts a new reason to celebrate.

Developed on the same test track and manufactured on the same production line as the 911 race cars, the GT3 returns to a market that has a brand-new competitor, the Mercedes-AMG GT R. Launched in 2016, the AMG GT R is the first track-prepped car to actually compete in the same niche, something that hasn’t happened in quite a few years. Will the 911 GT3 continue to dominate this demanding segment? Let’s find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Porsche 911 GT3.

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Porsche 911 GT3 Returns After Three Years with Bigger Engine

Porsche 911 GT3 Returns After Three Years with Bigger Engine

Manual transmission is an option!

It’s been some three years since the 991-generation 911 GT3 made its debut and a good couple of years since it became sold out. A new GT3 is long overdue, but the wait will be over in 2017 because Porsche just unveiled an updated model at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. Not surprisingly, it has been upgraded to 991.2-generation looks inside and out and fitted with new technology and a new engine.

A quick look is enough to notice what changed styling-wise. Up front, we have a remodeled bumper with a wider center intake and larger side vents. The LED daytime running lights above are slimmer, while the black winglets improve aerodynamics. Further changes are visible around back, in the shape of a new diffuser with black elements, a restyled license plate recess, new-style taillights, and a reshaped, larger wing.

There aren’t many changes to talk about inside, but customers will be greeted by a new steering wheel sourced from the 918 Spyder, enhanced side bolstering for the seats, electronically adjusting backrests and three optional seat variants. There’s the adaptive Sports Plus with 18-way power adjustment, bucket seats with folding backrest and integrated thorax airbag, and race-inspired, full bucket seats from from carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic. On the tech side, it gets the Connect Plus module and the Track Precision app as standard. The latter enables GT3 drivers to display, record, and analyze driving data on their smartphone or tablet.

There’s bigger news under the hood, where the 3.8-liter flat-six, the engine that caused a deal of trouble by catching fire in some cars in 2014, was replaced by the larger, 4.0-liter boxer. But while some expected Porsche to borrow the unit from the GT3 RS, the GT3 actually got the same engine as the GT3 Cup race car. The Germans claim that the 500-horsepower mill is virtually unchanged and mates to a revised seven-speed PDK as standard. Tipping the scales at 1,430 kg with a full fuel tank, the GT3 sprints to 62 mph in 3.4 seconds on its way to a top speed of 199 mph, four mph more than the previous model. A six-speed manual gearbox is available optionally, but reduces the 0-to-62 mph sprint to 3.9 ticks.

Other enhancements include rear-axle steering, a retuned chassis for better driving dynamics, a lowered ride height, and dynamic engine mounts. Pricing is set from €152,416 in Europe and from $143,600, excluding the $1,050 delivery, in the United States.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2017 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

2017 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

One-make race car updated to 991.2 design and larger engine

The current-generation Porsche 911, known as the 991, was introduced in 2011. Penned by Michael Mauer, it features an evolutionary design and rides on an entirely new platform, only the third since the nameplate’s introduction back in 1963. In 2016, Porsche launched the so-called second-generation 991 (dubbed 991.2), essentially a facelift with revised exterior features and new drivetrains.

Along with the facelift, Porsche has developed a revised version of the current 911 GT3 Cup. Based on the RS, the GT3 Cup is a track-only vehicle that’s available to privateers competing in the one-make series that Porsche organizes globally. The new race car received exterior updates similar to the road-going 991.2 911, new safety features, and a brand-new engine under the hood.

Set to make its debut in the 2017 racing season, initially exclusively in the Porsche Mobile 1 Supercup and the Porsche Carrera Cup (in both Germany and North America), the revised 911 GT3 Cup will be built on the same production line as the standard road car. The basic race tuning will be performed at the Weissach motorsport centre, where vehicles are also thoroughly tested by professional race drivers prior to delivery to the customer. Keep on reading to find out what updates the new GT3 Cup has in store.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup.

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5 Reasons The Mercedes-AMG GT R Is a Cool Alternative To The Porsche 911 GT3

5 Reasons The Mercedes-AMG GT R Is a Cool Alternative To The Porsche 911 GT3

Is the 911 GT3 finally getting a worthy competitor?

When Porsche introduced the 911 GT3 in 1999, it established a new niche of road-legal sports cars designed for the race track. Although the concept behind the GT3 wasn’t exactly new — it’s part of a line of high-performance models that goes back to the 1973 911 Carrera RS — the amount of race-bred components poured into the car was unprecedented. The fact that the track-oriented 911 was named after the FIA’s Group GT3 class also helped cement Porsche’s position at the top of the industry. The 911 GT3 has evolved dramatically since then and spawned even quicker and more powerful versions throughout its career. But, other automakers began to follow the same route and have launched strong competitors for Porsche’s range-topping, naturally aspirated coupe.

The latest to join these ranks is Mercedes-Benz, which unleashed the AMG GT R for the 2018 model year.

As the name suggests, it is a beefed-up version of the Mercedes-AMG GT, a sports coupe specifically developed to compete against the Porsche 911 Turbo. However, the GT R is not only quicker and more powerful than the standard GT, it’s also equipped with a massive amount of race-bred components, complemented by a body kit that’s nearly identical to the Mercedes-AMG GT3 race car. As you might have already guessed, the GT R was conceived to give the mighty 911 GT3 a run for its money.

But, does it have what it takes to compete against one of the most exciting sports cars ever built? I think so, and I put together five reasons why the GT R will make the 911 GT3 look over its shoulder in years to come.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Life-Sized Lego Replica Of Porsche 911 GT3 RS Is A Thing Of Beauty

Life-Sized Lego Replica Of Porsche 911 GT3 RS Is A Thing Of Beauty

It’s not drivable, but it’s still one of the coolest-looking Porsche 911 GT3 RS models we’ve seen

Lego Technic has a 1:8 scale Porsche 911 GT3 RS that has comes with 2,704 individual pieces. I’ve built my share of Legos and I know how difficult that can be. Can you imagine actually building a Lego version of the 911 GT3 RS that isn’t 1:8 scale, but is the size of the actual sports car? If you can’t, well, feast your eyes on this. This, friends, is Lego-building taken to a completely different level.

It may not be drivable or even accommodating, but neither of those things can stop this Lego 911 GT3 RS from being utterly and completely impressive. The detail itself is incredible, right down to the aerodynamics, interior, and wheels. If people didn’t know any better, they might actually think this is an actual 911 GT3 RS from a great distance.

Okay, that’s not entirely true, but the point is that the people who built this Lego 911 GT3 RS, presumably those from the company itself, did an incredible job piecing together all these blocks to create the final product. It must also be noted that the kit is placed on a platform with Lego Technic branding at the Mall of Scandinavia in Stockholm, Sweden. This could have been be a project that was done to promote the 1:8 scale Lego Technic 911 GT3 RS kit. As for the actual product, Lego says that it’s scheduled to hit U.S. stores this month at a price of $299.99.

It’s a little pricey, but considering how valuable Legos have become these days, some people might just chalk the purchase up to a nice investment.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

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2016 Porsche 911 GT3 R

2016 Porsche 911 GT3 R

Porsche has just debuted a new 911 customer race car, and although the GT3 R isn’t a new nameplate, Porsche’s Byzantine model hierarchy and naming system requires us to first explain where the new car fits in. This is the fourth racing version in as many years since the unveiling of the current Type 991 generation of the 911. Starting first with the 991 RSR, then the 991 GT3 Cup, the 991 GT America and now the 991 GT3 R. But all of this looks more complicated than it is; the RSR is a racing version of the regular car, the GT3 Cup and GT America are both based on the GT3 road car, and were simply made for different racing series. And finally we have the GT3 R, which is based on the GT3 RS road car.

To put it more simply still: this is the current ultimate track-focused 911. And since Porsche worked hard to make the GT3 RS as close to a race car as possible while still being street legal, not all that much has really been changed. And the GT3 R is likely to share some race tracks with impatient GT3 RS owners who couldn’t wait and performed the modifications themselves.

Updated 05/25/2016: Porsche dropped a new video in which shows the 911 GT3 R getting ready for the 24 Hours at the Nürburgring. Hit "play" to watch it!

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 R.

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Porsche 911 GT3 R Scores Its First Victory At Laguna Seca

Porsche 911 GT3 R Scores Its First Victory At Laguna Seca

Stuttgart rocket brings top of the podium in dominating fashion

Blue skies and warm weather saw one of Porsche’s finest clinch a win on Sunday, as Team Seattle/Alex Job Racing brought it home for a triumphant finish in the latest round of the IMSA SportsCar Championship. The famous central California racetrack played to the Porsche’s favor, as the No. 23 911 GT3 R led the GT Daytona class for the entirety of the two-hour race, successfully locking in its first win of the season.

At the helm were drivers Alex Riberas and Mario Farnbacher. Riberas was first out, managing to build a big lead before handing it off to Farnbacher. Unfortunately, a full-course caution quickly followed the driver change, as the No. 540 Black Swan Racing Porsche 911 GT3 R exited at Turn 5 just before the 50-minute mark.

Although the gap was gone, Farnbacher executed a flawless restart that saw him put distance on the challenging No. 63 Ferrari 488 of Alessandro Balzan. At one point, Balzan managed to get within three-quarters of a second to the Porsche, but couldn’t make the pass, eventually conceding 3.6 seconds at the checkered.

“It was tight at the flag, but I wasn’t going to let our maiden victory with the 911 GT3 R be taken away from us,” Farnbacher said. “Our team has worked hard for this success.”

Second place went to the Ferrari 488 GT3 of Christina Nielsen and Alessandro Balzan, while third went to the Aston Martin GT3 of Brandon Davis and James Davison.

The crew now heads to Detroit for the Chevrolet Sports Car Classic at Belle Isle Park on June 4th.

Continue reading for the full story.

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This LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS Looks Amazing: Video

This LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS Looks Amazing: Video

Lego designers really put in the desk hours making this Porsche 911 kit

Lego has done some pretty amazing things through the Techno line. It’s recreated the Caterham Super Seven, a Mini Cooper, and even a Formula Off-Roader and a 24 Hours Race Car seen here. It even created a Porsche with working suspension a few years back. Well, it seems like as the years go on, the brand gets better and better at making these crazy toys.

Case in point: Lego Technic No. 42056 – a Porsche 911 GT3 RS. It retails for $300 here in the U.S. and is arguably one of the most detailed and thorough kits to date. By that I mean it looks amazing and includes of 2,700 pieces. In size, the thing is over six-inches high, almost two feet long and nearly a foot wide. Plus, it even has a working PDK transmission. If you haven’t had a chance to set eyes on the kit yet, watching this four-minute video of Lego’s Senior Design Manager, Andrew Woodman, walk through the kit and all the little goodies that come with it.

I won’t spoil the video for you, but if you’re a Lego fan, it’s certainly one you want to watch. Woodman breaks down a few of the things that come with the kit and displays just how detailed the Lego model really is. With that said, go ahead – hit play and be amazed by the shocking detail of Lego Technic’s newest kit.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS In Gulf Livery Ends Up In The Water

Porsche 911 GT3 RS In Gulf Livery Ends Up In The Water

That’s one way to test the weatherstripping on the front luggage compartment

Porsche’s may be liquid cooled these days, but apparently somebody at the Porsche Centrum Amsterdam dealership in Holland didn’t get the memo of how to properly fill the radiator and coolant tank. Full details have yet to emerge about exactly how this brand new Porsche 911 GT3 RS ended up nose first in the drink, but there are two rumors floating around right now.

At first, it’s easy to imagine a disgruntled employee driving the car of the edge to stick it to the man one last time before a highly fashionable discontinuation of employment. Of course, nothing that dramatic appears to have happened. One rumor blames a mechanic that made a mistake, and the other blames a body guy who was applying a stripe decal. Either way, the pretty Porsche in Gulf Oil livery ended up in a rather awkward parking spot.

According to RTL News, the managing director of Porsche Centrum, Hans Van der Valk, said, “The car was parked on the waterfront and a mechanic made a mistake when trying to get in the vehicle. That is very unfortunate, but it can happen. When there are people, mistakes are made.” Even more interesting is that Van der Valk believes the car can be saved, saying, “Only the tip was in the water and no one was hurt. There’s not much damage.”

Continue reading for the full story.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Looks Great In Lava Orange: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 RS Looks Great In Lava Orange: Video

The 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS really is a fireball of fun. Launched at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show with updated styling and technology, the GT3 RS does its namesake proud, thanks in part to a 4.0-liter flat-six engine that pumps out an incredible 500 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque. That’s 50 ponies more than the previous GT3 RS, which goes to show how much time and effort Porsche put into making the car as lethal as it is. Suffice to say, a sprint time of 0 to 62 mph and a top speed of at least 195 mph is the final stamp of approval for the sports car.

Having said all of that, let’s take a gander at this new video featuring the new 911 GT3 RS, decked out to perfection in a Lava Orange paint finish. The video itself isn’t really informative, at least compared to what we’ve become accustomed to. It runs 5:44 long and it just features the 911 GT3 RS doing some quick-hit laps around a race track. The unmistakable sound of the flat-six engine can be heard clearly and you can tell that time and effort was put into creating some solid video angles of the sports car. Credit to the editing too because the video, even without any narration, looks about as clean as it can get.

Start your weekend off on the right foot and watch the video. Who knows, you might be inspired enough to get yourself a 911 GT3 RS for the holidays.

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XCAR Reviews 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

XCAR Reviews 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

The Porsche 911 GT3 RS sits on the top of the 911 hierarchy as the purest expression of the 911 name. That comes with the territory of being the fastest and most powerful car in the legendary lineup. But, as good as the GT3 RS is, it still begs the question: is it really the best among all versions of the 911?

XCAR tried to find an answer to that question by taking the 911 GT3 RS for a spin around the road and, more importantly, around the track. It goes without saying that Porsche developed the GT3 RS as the more track-focused version of the entire 911 lineup. It’s got more power, less weight, and harder springs than any other 911. In other words, it’s the equivalent of a race car without actually being a race car.

Therein lies the rub with the 911 GT3 RS. As fast and as powerful as it is — nobody can argue with its output of 493 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque, good enough to spring from 0 to 60 mph in 3.3 seconds and hit a top speed of 193 mph — the 911 GT3 RS is a niche sports car that caters more to track enthusiasts and less to everyday drivers. For starters, it has no rear seats thanks to the presence of a roll cage that every track car is expected to have. It’s also not as comfortable as most would like it to be and the engine noise can get pretty loud. That may be the perfect recipe for a car that’s blasting around a race track, but not so much for a car doing errands on a regular weekend.

Porsche knows all of that, yet it’s not making any apologies for what the 911 GT3 RS supposedly can and can’t do. This car, no matter how people try to slice it, is meant to be driven on the track. It’s been developed as such and it performs that way too. So excuse the fretting whenever somebody drives the 911 GT3 RS out on the public road. While it does live up to its reputation as the most extreme version of the 911, those who have driven the GT3 RS on the road and on the track will tell you that the only way to unleash its full potential is to do it in the latter.

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Next Porsche 911 GT3 Will Once Again Offer Manual Transmission

Next Porsche 911 GT3 Will Once Again Offer Manual Transmission

The auto industry can be a pretty unforgiving place, especially if a company tries to reinvent the wheel when it shouldn’t have to in the first place. For all of Porsche’s engineering brilliance, it’s also had moments when it tries to think too much of what can be without looking in front to see what’s already there. Purists of the Porsche 911 know this all too well after Porsche decided to go with a full automatic transmission on the 911 GT3, considered as the spiritual embodiment of the 911’s celebrated lineage. Fortunately, Porsche itself isn’t above reproach and has recognized the need to bring back the manual transmission on the GT3. Yep, according to Car and Driver, the successor to the current 911 GT3 will be available with an automatic or a manual transmission.

That’s reason to jump for joy for those people who felt short-changed when the 911 GT3 arrived with only one transmission type in tow. It’s easy to understand Porsche’s rationale behind it. The company wanted the 911 GT3 to embrace its track potential and doing so meant that the use of a quick-shifting transmission that can maximize its power and performance capabilities. But, in its quest to make racers and track-day enthusiasts happy, it left out an equally important segment of Porsche customers: those who care more about the emotional connection between them and the car.

As good as the 911 GT3 is on the track (numbers don’t lie: 0 to 60 mph in 3.3 seconds; top speed of 195 mph), a segment of the 911-loving community felt it compromised its spirit in the pursuit of performance. It took a while for Porsche to come to grips with it, but fortunately, it’s finally come to its senses.

In the short term, Porsche is planning a limited edition model called the 911 R that will carry the GT3’s 3.8-liter flat-six engine that delivers 475 horsepower and 324 pound-feet of torque on the nose. More importantly, though, is that it will use a manual transmission. Once the next generation 911 GT3 arrives, it will be offered with both a six-speed manual transmission and a seven-speed PDK transmission, as it should have been from the very beginning.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Chris Harris Puts The Aston GT12 Vs. 991 GT3RS Vs. McLaren 650S: Video

Chris Harris Puts The Aston GT12 Vs. 991 GT3RS Vs. McLaren 650S: Video

When you’re a car presenter and you’re given three sports cars with features unique to their own, picking one over the two others is an incredibly difficult task. But Chris Harris isn’t your typical car presenter. He’s been around this block long enough to know how the game works. In this particular instance, Harris was given a chance to line up three of today’s most desirable sports cars - the Porsche 991 GT3 RS, Aston Martin GT12, and McLaren 650S - to determine which of these three gives prospective customers the most bang for their buck, which in this case would be above £200,000, or a little over $300,000 based on current exchange rates.

In true Harris fashion, the affable presenter neatly laid out the pros of each model, starting with the GT3 RS, a car he says is “natural and intuitive” in every thing it does. Once he was done gushing over the Porsche, Harris turned his attention to the GT12, which is actually sold out. Still, Harris was still able to have a few thoughts on the track-tuned Aston, calling it “outrageous fun” before lamenting on whether it was the best car he has driven in 2015. Then there’s the 650S, without question the fastest and most powerful of the three. Harris didn’t even hesitate calling the 650 “better” in a lot ways than its two rivals.

So, the question Harris eventually wanted to answer was if any of these three supercars are worth their price tags. Like the true gear head that he is, Harris eventually settled on an answer that’s not only predictable, but also shows how hard it is to pick one, even though, technically, the GT12’s sold out status disqualifies it from the choices.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Owner Says His Car Has Downforce Problems On The Nurburgring

Porsche 911 GT3 RS Owner Says His Car Has Downforce Problems On The Nurburgring

The Porsche 911 GT3 RS has seen wide approval since its debut. It’s 4.0-liter, flat-six engine produces 500 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque – a gain of 25 horsepower and 15 pound-feet over the standard GT3. To accommodate this extra power and to increase downforce, the RS has a huge rear wing and a front lip that surrounds the front fascia. These aerodynamic modifications, however, might be too much for the RS.

According to at least one GT3 RS owner, the downforce created by the RS’s aero package is more of a problem than anything. As shown in the video, the RS’s tires actually make contact with the wheel wells as the driver takes a spin around the Nurburgring. It is quite evident that the suspension just isn’t stiff enough to compensate for the amount of downforce. According to the owners blog post, his RS has a stock suspension system, so it looks like this problem may be a design flaw. The question is, how did this flaw get past the engineers while the RS was in the testing phase?

Continue reading for the full story.

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EVO Reviews The Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

EVO Reviews The Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

At one time, it was rumored that the 2016 Porsche GT3 RS would receive a turbocharged flat-six, but it didn’t. Instead, it received a 4.0-liter, naturally aspirated flat-six that is good for 500 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque. With a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission and rear-wheel drive, the GT3 has an estimated top speed of 196 mph. In a recent video by EVO, Jethro Bovington took the GT3 around the track to see how it compared with some of the other vehicles like the 2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale and the GT3’s sibling, the 2014 Porsche Turbo S.

The 458 Speciale cranks out 596 horsepower and 698 pound-feet of torque from a 4.5-liter V-8. It hits 60 mph in just 3 seconds has a top speed of 202 mph. The Turbo S puts out 560 horsepower from a 3.8-liter flat-six, and tackles a 60 mph sprint in just 2.9 seconds. Top speed comes in at 197 mph. Other vehicles on EVO’s leaderboard include the 2014 Mclaren P1 (with and without Trofeo tires), 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder, Porsche 911 Turbo, 2016 Aston Martin Vantage GT12 and the 2016 Nissan GT-R.

It is entertaining to watch Bovington pilot the GT3 around the track. It is clear that it is a little hard for him to get used to, as he frequently drifts off the road slightly around curves. Even so, he never actually loses control of the car, and the car performs well overall. The GT3 might look like the lesser of the three on paper, but as it turns out, it fares quite well against its sibling and most of the other models on EVO’s leaderboard. Enjoy the video!

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EVO Takes A Short Look At The Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

EVO Takes A Short Look At The Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

The video you will see here is not exactly an in-depth review. In fact, the narrator hardly says much of anything at all. The reason for that is that sometimes you just don’t need to say much of anything. When the subject is the 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, all you need is the sound of the engine, some shots of the car being driven fast and some shots of the big, stupid grin on the driver’s face. Because for anyone who isn’t planning to use the GT3 RS to compete in motorsports (and there’s the 2013 Porsche 911 GT3 RSR for that), it’s really just a machine that makes big, stupid grins.

If you’re interested in the numbers for this car, you’ve probably read them all already. You’re prepared to debate the relative merits of the PDK and electric power steering and you’ve probably got some very definite opinions about the styling. But it is statistically unlikely that you know just how happy it can make you to sit behind the wheel of a Type 911 GT3 RS at speed, and this video will attempt to convey that joy.

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Ferrari 458 Speciale Vs. Porsche 911 GT3: Video

Ferrari 458 Speciale Vs. Porsche 911 GT3: Video

Fast Porsche 911s used to be pretty good on-paper rivals for mid-engine V-8 Ferraris. Somewhere along the way that changed when V-8 Ferraris started getting faster and much more expensive, and Porsche continued to keep the GT3 and Turbo 911 in the realm of the attainable — relatively speaking. But, that doesn’t mean comparing the two isn’t a ridiculously fun way to spend an afternoon.

Fifth Gear put ex-racer-turned-television-host Tiff Needell behind the wheel of a 2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale and noted tire destroyer Chris Harris in a 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 and set them both loose at England’s Castle Comb Circuit for a knockdown drag-out battle for Italo-German supremacy.

Both cars are faster, more-hardcore variants of the models on which they’re based. The 458 Italia-based Speciale’s high-strung 4.5-liter V-8 produces 596 horsepower at a manic 9,000 rpm. It’s also an entire 200 pounds lighter than the Italia and features an active aerodynamics system that channels air through or around the car, depending on downforce needs.

The GT3 finds itself at somewhat of a disadvantage in face of the Ferrari’s power and tech, but it’s not exactly slow, either. Its 3.8-liter flat six produces 475 horsepower and it weighs a scant 3,153 pounds. Both figures are inferior to that of the Italian car’s, but the 911’s trick rear-wheel steering system endows it with both astounding high-speed stability and low-speed agility. Plus, at about $130,000, it’s less than half what the Speciale costs.

Place your bets, and check out Tiff ’s yodeling skills at 1:50. Seriously, I’ve never seen a car elicit those sorts of mouth noises from anyone.
Nice work if you can get it, huh?

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Dozen Of Porsche GT3s Recalled To Have Their Engines Replaced. Again

Dozen Of Porsche GT3s Recalled To Have Their Engines Replaced. Again

Launched for the 2014 model year, the latest 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 has had a rather rough debut on the market, as the Germans had to recall all 785 cars sold in 2013 to replace their engines. The callback came after two GT3s suffered engine fires and Stuttgart concluded that the 3.8-liter flat-six units had issues with a loosened screw joint on the piston connecting rod. Now, it’s being revealed that the German automaker has issued another recall, this time around for a valvetrain-related problem.

According to Car and Driver, about a dozen sports cars are affected by this issue. Four of them are in use as Nurburgring taxis on the famous race track, while the rest of them are in customer hands. All examples had their engines replaced with new units, as fixing would have taken too long.

"It is true that in some very rare cases we have had minor issues with the valvetrain," Porsche spokesman Thomas Becki said. "To repair these engines would have taken longer than we found acceptable for our GT3 customers, so we replaced the engines and repaired them afterwards."

The repaired engines will be used by Porsche in development testing.

This new recall might explain the GT3 RS test car that was recently spotted on the Nurburgring. Unless Porsche is testing some updates, it’s safe to assume the German engineers want to make sure the 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS won’t be plagued by similar issues.

Continue reading for the full story.

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What Is the Porsche 911 GT3 RS Doing Back on the Nurburgring?

What Is the Porsche 911 GT3 RS Doing Back on the Nurburgring?

It’s not exactly unusual for high-performance cars to return to the test track a few months after being revealed in production guise, but the 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS’ recent comeback to the Nurburgring track raises more questions than it answers. Is there something wrong with the new GT3 RS? Is Porsche working on a few updates or, and this would be the most spectacular scenario, maybe testing a new model altogether?

The actual answer is still a mystery, but word has it Porsche is either attempting to fix a calibration issue that was discovered while the first cars were being prepared for their customers or testing some drivetrain software upgrades that may be introduced in the future. It could also mean that Stuttgart might have commenced testing for the much-rumored 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, but it would be a bit too early for such a prototype given the hyper 911 is reportedly scheduled to arrive three years from now.

Testing aside, the GT3 RS, which was unveiled at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show, should be ready to meet its first customers later this year. As a brief reminder, the most powerful naturally aspirated 911 on the market right now uses a 4.0-liter flat-six engine rated at 493 horsepower and 384 pound-feet of torque. It needs only 3.3 seconds to hit 62 mph and hits a top speed of 193 mph. Sounds like this road-legal race car doesn’t need any upgrades...

Continue reading for the full story.

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Jeff Zwart At Pikes Peak International Hill Climb 2015: Video

Jeff Zwart At Pikes Peak International Hill Climb 2015: Video

Jeff Zwart is one of those guys you kind of want to be. As co-founder of Radical Media, he’s shot commercials for just about every car company there is. Remember that epic Porsche commercial from a few years ago that showed seemingly every important Porsche ever built charging through the desert? That was his. He’s also a massive Porsche geek, collector and racer.

A regular at the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb, Zwart drove his Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Turbo to a Time Attack 1 class victory with a time of 9:46.243 at the 2015 event, and it’s all been captured in high-definition 4k in this stunning video, shot by his colleague, Will Roegge.

The more eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that Porsche doesn’t sell a GT3 Cup with a turbo. Zwart’s 997 Cup car is powered by a twin-turbo flat six from a 2008 Porsche 911 GT2 997, that produces around 600 horsepower. He drove a bone-stock 2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS from his home in California to the top of Pikes Peak for the 2011 event, and then decided to drop a turbocharged engine in a Cup chassis after the route was fully paved ahead of the 2012 event.

In addition to the Cup Turbo, Zwart also owns one of only a handful of early Porsche 356s built in Gmünd, Austria — a rally-prepped 914-6, a 906 Carrera 6 hill-climb car and a 911 that competed in the 1971 East African Safari Rally, among others. These aren’t garage queens either. He drives them all regularly. I told you Jeff Zwart is someone you want to be.

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XCAR Review The Porsche 911 GT3: Video

XCAR Review The Porsche 911 GT3: Video

Reviews of the Type 991 Porsche 911 GT3 are always going to come down to one thing: the transmission. That because the GT3 isn’t offered with a manual transmission anymore, and the purists have been predictably outraged about it. So the fact that XCar titled its GT3 review “Don’t Sweat The Gearbox” shouldn’t come as much of a surprise. To the reviewer’s credit, he manages to cover some other parts of the car first, and though the transmission is the most important part of the review, it’s not the only part.

The closest that a street legal 911 comes to being a race car is the GT3 RS, but the non-RS GT3 isn’t far behind, and as the reviewer points out here, even the “regular” mode for the suspension is what most would consider sport mode. This is one of the big reasons for the PDK instead of a three-pedal manual, it simply shifts faster than a human can; and if you’re really serious about a no-compromises approach to performance, then you have to go with the fastest option. The other big reason for the PDK is that people weren’t buying manuals, simple as that.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Walter Röhrl Drives The New Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

Walter Röhrl Drives The New Porsche 911 GT3 RS: Video

It’s obvious from just looking at the 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS that it is a machine that means business. But in order to get a complete picture of just how serious a machine it really is, one needs to see it on the track and in the hands of a professional. And while the word “professional” is entirely inadequate for someone of Walter Rohrl’s skill level, you get the idea. In this video we can see him taking the car around a track, and from the occasional sounds of protest coming from the tires, it’s safe to assume that he’s got it right at the edge.

The video gives us a few different views of the action, so as to form a more complete picture. Possibly the most entertaining of these is when we get a look at Rohrl’s face as he’s driving, betraying no emotion whatsoever. Then again, for someone like him, this isn’t exactly a difficult task. Perhaps the lack of a third pedal made him bored. The other views show some pretty impressive laps, although the video description doesn’t say which track it is.

Continue reading for more info.

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Chris Harris Drives The Porsche 991 GT3 RS On Road And Track: Video

Chris Harris Drives The Porsche 991 GT3 RS On Road And Track: Video

There’s always a car of moment, and right now the moment belongs to the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS, the fastest car in the 911 hierarchy before you get to all-out racers like the GT3 R and GT3 RSR. After seemingly years of teasing and spy shots, Porsche has finally released the 991 911 GT3 RS into the wild. Noted Porsche fanatic and red shorts wearer Chris Harris recently got to spend some time behind the wheel on both road and track.

Not surprisingly, he really likes it, and how could he not? With a high-revving 4.0-liter flat-six cranking out 500 horsepower anda wide-body shell that’s about 20 pounds lighter than the normal GT3, the RS is a rear-engined ball of aggression. It devours the smooth German roads and autobahn near Porsche’s headquarters, and at the same time is just as usable as any other 911 in the range. But, it really comes alive on Porsche’s Weissach test track, where Chris does his best to set fire to the enormous 325/31 ZR 21 rear Michelins. Pretty much his only criticism is that it’s not available with a manual transmission.

Chris has quite a history with the GT3 RS. In 2010, he and teammates Roland Asch, Patrick Simon and Horst von Saurma drove what was essentially a bog-standard 997 GT3 RS on slick tires to an amazing 13th place finish at the Nürburgring 24, beating out countless purpose-built GT3 class racers in the process. Shortly after that, he owned a 997 GT3 RS 4.0 for a few months, one of only 600 ever built.

Side note about the shirt he’s wearing in the second half of the video: Some time ago, Chris bet Porsche’s Wolfgang Hatz that the company would not be able to sell all 918 units of the 918 Spyder. Chris lost the bet and held up his end by wearing an apology T-shirt.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Hits 186 MPH At Hockenheim: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 RS Hits 186 MPH At Hockenheim: Video

There’s little doubt that the new 911 GT3 RS is a seriously fast car. That much should be confirmed when road tests begin surfacing in the coming weeks, but until then, German journalist Christian Gebhardt and Sport Auto have released this teaser of the GT3 RS being put through it’s paces at the Hockenheim circuit.

The 4.0-liter flat-six sounds absolutely fantastic. We get our first ear-full while it’s bouncing off the rev limiter in launch control mode and then howling off into the distance while the traction control system finds purchase on the tarmac, leaving behind two Morse code-style black lines. After that, Gebhardt, cool as a cucumber in the cockpit, takes it out for some hot laps and then a top speed run where it’s taken up to 186 mph (300 km/h), just a few miles per hour shy of its top speed.

With an even 500 horsepower, a seven-speed PDK transmission and plenty of Porsche motorsport genetics, the GT3 RS could one of the best cars we see all year. We should be learning a lot more about it very soon.

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2000 - 2005 Porsche 911 GT3 (996)

2000 - 2005 Porsche 911 GT3 (996)

After the debut of the 996-generation 911 in 1998, Porsche began making plans to enter the car into the GT3 class of the FIA, and set out to develop both the race car and the road-going version which was required by GT class homologation rules. The car debuted at the 1999 Geneva Motor Show as the first road-legal Porsche to wear a GT3 badge. As with Porsche’s previous 911 RS models, the 996 GT3 was focused on racing and became the 996-generation’s range-topping model until until a new GT2 was launched for the 2002 model year.

The first in a line of performance cars that would return with each generation (unlike the GT2), the GT3 featured extensive body and interior modifications and a significantly more powerful engine. While the GT2 got its impressive output from a turbocharged unit, the GT3 remained naturally aspirated, although its engine was based on the twin-turbo that motivated the Le Mans-winning GT1. A wide array of modifications made it more streetable.

Porsche continued to build the GT3 into 2005, almost a year after the standard 996 was replaced by the 997, but it did not bring it to the United States until 2004. A decade since it has been discontinued, the 996 GT3 remains one of the most sought-after water-cooled Porsche 911s.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 996 GT3

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Porsche Says It Will Focus On Weight Instead Of Power

Porsche Says It Will Focus On Weight Instead Of Power

Nowadays, it seems as though the auto industry’s infatuation with efficiency is met blow for blow with a growing ferocity in the horsepower wars. While the majority of vehicles sold focus on eking out every last drop of mileage, the faster, less practical, and more fun-oriented sports cars of the world seem obsessed with posting output figures that one-up the competitors purely for the sake of bragging rights. It’s an endless, self-propagating cycle, but now it seems Porsche is opting out, content to instead focus on simplicity and lower weight rather than pure engine numbers. 

“I’m not a believer in this horsepower monster, up, up, up, more, more, more,” said Andreas Preuninger, head of Porsche’s GT division, in a recent interview with the UK-based publication CAR. “For my personal tastes, around 500 bhp is enough, because 700-800 bhp calls for bigger brakes, sturdier suspension, it gets heavier and heavier logically.”

For Preuninger, the focus should be on matching output to the car in hand, rather than simply adding horsepower for horsepower’s sake alone: “I think it’s not my engineering target to get 50 bhp more every generation, I’d rather turn it around and make the car lighter again, a specific horsepower per kilo.”

While Preuninger said Porsche “wouldn’t turn back,” that is, detune an engine’s performance, it would instead focus on offering a complete package for its customers. “This is not a dragster, it’s a track car.” 

Continue reading for the full story.

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Mark Webber Takes The Porsche 991 GT3 RS For A Spin On The Nurburgring

Mark Webber Takes The Porsche 991 GT3 RS For A Spin On The Nurburgring

What’s this? The new Porsche 911 GT3 RS lapping the Nurburgring? Again? Why would Porsche bring the GT3 RS back to the Green Hell more than a month after unveiling it at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show, and why is former F1 driver Mark Webber behind the wheel? Well, for a moment there I thought the Germans were looking to set a new track record, but, according to the car paparazzi who sent us these spy shots, it turned out that Porsche and Webber were just making a promotional video for the new sports car.

The scenario makes sense given the GT3 RS is painted in the new and flashy Lava Orange, the nameplate’s new presentation color. Also, Webber’s presence for the shooting isn’t surprising considering the Australian has been a Porsche works driver in the World Endurance Championship since 2014.

There’s no word when this new video will hit the Interwebz, but, until then, there’s plenty of fun you can have in the car’s newly launched online configurator. The GT3 RS goes on sale later this year, from $175,900.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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Porsche 911 GT3 Versus Jet Fighter - Dopamine Wars: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 Versus Jet Fighter - Dopamine Wars: Video

This isn’t the first time that a sports car has been pitted against a jet fighter for the sake of marketing, but I’m pretty sure it is the first time that this specific type of comparison has been done. Porsche Netherlands came up with the idea of measuring the neurotransmitter dopamine secreted by a subject’s brain while first being a jet fighter passenger and then riding shotgun in a Porsche 911 GT3.

The fighter jet in question is none other than the Aero L-39 Albatros, the most widely used jet trainer in the world, and you can be sure that it’s able to deliver a lot more G-force to its passenger than any Porsche 911, even in GT3-spec. As it happens, G-force levels aren’t the only reasons for a person’s rising dopamine levels while being thrown around. Excitement does it as well. According to the results of the two rides, the airplane won overall, but the Porsche’s numbers were mighty close for something whose wing is supposed to keep it on the ground, not in the air.

According to the footage above, the funky-looking red cap that the test subject was wearing is actually an EEG monitor, which recorded his brain activity during both rides. As the "scientist" in the video concludes, "taking a hard left in a fighter jet is similar to taking a hard left in a Porsche." Or something like that. Either way, the 911 GT3 is probably the last Porsche to actually need this type of marketing, don’t you think?

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2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Sounds Majestic: Video

2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Sounds Majestic: Video

Listening to the 911 GT3 RS in an official Porsche promotional video is a pretty good way to spend the time, but hearing it in the real world is on a whole other level. This is what happened to known car-spotted NM2255, who recently had the chance to be around a 911 GT3 RS in GT Silver Metallic. His encounter obviously resulted in a must-see video, as the Porsche driver frantically revved and briefly launched the car hard on more than one occasion.

Given the license plate, I suspect this is a press car and the driver is probably a Porsche test driver that was kind enough to do a couple of parking lot laps at full chat for the car-spotter. While the car doesn’t looks as glamorous as in the official Porsche videos, its hair-raising exhaust note more than makes up for it.

As a refresher, the 911 GT3 RS is powered by a 4.0-liter flat-six that delivers 500 horsepower at a stratospheric 8,250 rpm and 339 pound-feet of torque. Sent to the rear wheels through a seven-speed, dual-clutch, transmission and a limited-slip differential, those numbers are enough to catapult the model from 0-62 mph in just 3.3 seconds. The 911 GT3 is more than some dry performance figures though, and the video above gives a small taste of what is like to be in the presence of such a special car. The only thing missing was probably a bit of paint detailing or a good car wash to enhance the look of that silver paint.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS And Cayman GT4 Star In Latest Promo: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 RS And Cayman GT4 Star In Latest Promo: Video

Already off to a great start in 2015, following the introduction of the 911 GT3 RS and the Cayman GT4, Porsche just released a short promo in order to build more hype around its new sports cars. The video begins with the two vehicles being put through their paces on a twisty road, but the footage quickly moves onto the race track, where the GT3 RS and the GT4 battle for supremacy under full throttle. In short, Porsche is simply bragging about having two new track-focused sports cars on their way to dealerships and asks viewers which one would they prefer. Make sure you watch the video above and then drop me a line about which of the two you would prefer in the comments box below.

To make things fair I’ll go first and pick the Cayman GT4. Why? It’s quite simple. As much as I love 911s in general and the GT3 in particular, I also love to row my own gears. As you’re probably aware, the GT3 RS is a PDK-exclusive machine, and that’s exactly what makes it less appealing for me. The Cayman GT4, on the other hand, is equipped with a six-speed manual that makes driving it a much more engaging experience, especially on a twisty race track. Problem is I can’t afford it just yet, so if any of you has some $90K to spare I’d be more than happy to take it off your hands.

And do you imagine that it’s coincidence that the 911 passes the
Cayman but not vice versa? Uh-huh. I think the Cayman driver just didn’t want to lose his job.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Testing At Nardo: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 RS Testing At Nardo: Video

Having already seen the brand-new 911 GT3 RS in all its splendor at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show earlier this week, I was already looking forward for the obligatory track videos to start hitting the Interwebz. Fortunately, it didn’t take long for the first footage to go up on Porsche’s official YouTube account, and we can finally have a glimpse of Stuttgart’s latest road-legal race car being put through its paces on a closed course. The bad news is the video above wasn’t filmed at the Nurburgring, as many of you probably expected, but on Volkswagen’s very own Nardo test track. I’m not complaining though, as I’m sure there’s more where this came from and we’ll be seeing the GT3 RS being hooned around various tracks soon enough.

Meanwhile, Porsche asked factory driver Brendon Hartley to take the RS out for a spin while also showcasing some of the vehicle’s features. The script is a bit sentimental as it shows an enthusiastic Hartley documenting his first encounter with the RS, but the six-minute video has enough track action to make it worth watching. At least the music isn’t loud enough to cover the awesome soundtrack of the naturally aspirated, 4.0-liter, inline-six powerplant.

As a brief reminder, the new GT3 RS packs 500 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque, which is identical to the 997-generation GT3 RS 4.0. However, the new RS is 0.6 second quicker to 60 mph due to improved underpinnings and a lighter curb weight.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS Configurator Goes Live

Porsche 911 GT3 RS Configurator Goes Live

It’s been only a couple of days since Porsche unleashed the mighty 911 GT3 RS at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show, and the 500-horsepower sports car is already at our disposal through the company’s online configurator. So whether you have at least $175,900 to spare or you’re just curious about the options this track beast can be equipped with, now it’s a great time to start building your very own GT3 RS.

As a reminder, the GT3 RS returns to the market for 2016 after a four-year hiatus, with a naturally aspirated, 500-horsepower, 339-pound-feet, 4.0-liter, flat-six powerplant at the rear. The engine is identical to the one Porsche planted in the GT3 RS 4.0 back in 2011, but due to revised chassis and body components, as well as a quick-shifting PDK transmission, the new GT3 RS is 0.6 second quicker from 0 to 60 mph, a benchmark it now achieves in 3.3 ticks.

Visually, the new sports car represents a significant departure from the previous model, as Porsche decided to craft the aerodynamic body around a 911 Turbo shell. As a result, the 2016 GT3 RS is the first of its kind to sport Turbo intakes on the rear fenders. The louvered front fenders are yet another novelty for the RS, as is the magnesium roof, which lowers the center of gravity. But enough with the talk, let’s see what options the GT3 RS has in stock for 2016.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

The 911 GT3 nameplate was introduced in 1999 as a spiritual successor to the 1973 911 RS. The RS name was first revived in 2003 as a more powerful and track-focused version of the 996-generation GT3. At first motivated by a 3.6-liter flat-six rated at 381 horsepower, the RS gained 415 ponies when the 997-gen version was launched. Updated for 2009, the 997 RS received a 3.8-liter six-cylinder with 450 horses. For 2011, Porsche launched the GT3 RS 4.0 with a 4.0-liter engine and 500 ponies, putting an end to the 997-generation RS. In 2015, four years since the last RS rolled off the assembly line, the nameplate is making a comeback for the 991-generation 911. Preceded by the 475-horsepower GT3 in 2013, the new GT3 RS broke cover at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show with updated styling and technology.

The big news is Porsche’s range-topping, road-legal racer retains its traditional naturally aspirated status. Although previous rumors claimed the Germans would drop a turbocharged flat-six behind its rear hood, it turns out rear fenders are the only elements the GT3 RS received from the 911 Turbo. Keep reading to find out more.

Updated 03/06/2015: Porsche unveiled a new video featuring the all-new 911 GT3 RS in action on the Nardo race track. Enjoy!

Continue reading to learn more about the new Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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Five More GT3 Road Cars Expected in 2015

Five More GT3 Road Cars Expected in 2015

Nowadays, whenever you hear "GT3" it will usually mean just one of two things: either the person you’re talking with has a mutual interest in endurance racing, and most of all the FIA GT3 class, or the topic of conversation is the Porsche 911 GT3. As it happens, I’m talking about racing, and things are about to change in 2015, since five more road cars inspired by the FIA GT3 class are expected to be unveiled in the upcoming months.

According to Autocar’s Andrew Frankel, only one of those cars will bear Porsche badges, while the other four will each come from a different manufacturer. Don’t expect them to be simply called GT3 either, since the Stuttgart sports-car maker has actually trademarked this exact moniker for road-going cars. That said, since Bentley is already offering a limited edition Continental GT3-R, variations of the "GT3" name don’t seem to infringe on the trademark.

Although still speculative, the information regarding most of the upcoming sports cars is anchored in reality, as the FIA GT3 endurance racing category is now more popular than ever and a lot of carmakers are starting to express interest in it. Naturally, this means that almost every FIA GT3 racing car will have a corresponding road car, just like in the golden days of motorsport.

Click past the jump to read more about the future GT3 road cars.

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Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. Triumph Daytona Vs. Polaris RMK On Ice: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. Triumph Daytona Vs. Polaris RMK On Ice: Video

While speeds may be lower once you step onto ice, the danger is still very much present for high-performance driving. Even with special tires, downforce, and a deft right foot, successful navigation on frozen surfaces is a constant balancing act.

That’s what makes stunts like these so treacherous. Accidently laying it down in front of a machine weighing in excess of 3,000 pounds might end in disaster if there isn’t enough grip to stop.

Despite this hazard, these three stunt pilots do a good job in a lead-follow through the iced-over landscape, with plenty of donuts, drifts, and tall, white roostertails. However, it would have been nice to see an actual race, so we could gauge the speed differences between these three machines. Obviously, the snowmobile is most in its element, but it’s hard to discount the power of the motorcycle. Given a straightaway, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the Triumph pull ahead.

Funny enough, in these conditions, the Porsche is left for dead. Even with a stripped-out interior, race-prepped handling package, and substantially greater power, the German powerhouse just can’t compete. In fact, in this company, it almost looks clumsy. Of course, an AWD model would have helped.

Next time, how about some orange cones and a start/finish line? You know, for science.

Click past the jump to read about the Porsche 911 GT3.

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Chris Harris Picks Car of the Year 2014: Video

Chris Harris Picks Car of the Year 2014: Video

There are worse ways to make a living than gallivanting around the world driving some of the greatest cars mankind has ever produced, so it’s fair to say that Chris Harris has a job we all want. He calls his latest video “Car of the Year 2014,” but contrary to what the name suggests it’s not so much a contest, but rather a 42-minute celebration of Harris’ favorite cars of the last two years or so.

The setting is the beautiful Autódromo Internacional do Algarve in Portimão, Portugal and the players are the Porsche 918 Spyder, Porsche GT3, Ferrari 458 Speciale, Ferrari F12berlinetta, Renault Megane 275 Trophy-R, Aston Martin V12 Vantage S, and BMW M3. There are no winners or losers, just Harris and a few of his friends who have helped him out along the way, torching Pirellis and leaving long black marks all over the Portuguese tarmac.

Side activities include an impromptu go-kart race, with Harris and his longtime cameraman Neil Carry switching roles and failing miserably, and an unlikely drag race between the Porsche 918, Ferrari F12 and Renault Megane Trophy-R. No prizes for correctly predicting the finishing order for that one.

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Porsche 911 GT3 RS To Get A Brand New Engine

Porsche 911 GT3 RS To Get A Brand New Engine

With the 911 GT3 in RS spec getting ready to be officially unveiled in the near future, information regarding its propulsion is bound to take a lot of Porsche fans by surprise. According to Porsche’s chief of R&D Wolfgang Hatz, the upcoming 911 GT3 RS will be powered by an all-new, naturally-aspirated, flat-six engine. In an interview he gave the Brits from Auto Express at NAIAS 2015 in Detroit, Hatz let it slip that the new hardcore Porsche model will be the first car to feature the new powerplant, with the engine eventually working its way into other 911 variants.

Recent reports about the 911 range getting some new turbocharged engines with four and/or six cylinders are still on the table, but Porsche’s R&D chief apparently insisted that those will only be used on lesser models. In other words, the Boxster, Cayman and a yet-to-be-confirmed 912 entry-level version of the 911 will be the only ones receiving them.

Getting back to the 2016 911 GT3 RS, it seems that although a manual transmission hasn’t been completely ruled out, the PDK dual-clutch transmission from the regular GT3 will be the only gearbox available in the beginning, with Hatz even quoting some pleased GT3 customers which said that they have been converted. Unlike the normal GT3, which is also mildly comfortable when required, the RS variant should literally feel like a racing car for the road. "Performance has to be the main objective. Customers love the current GT3. The RS has to be the peak. The 991 GT3 was very much a surprise for everybody because it’s a very useable car for every day. The GT3 RS will be more extreme," Wolfgang Hatz told Auto Express.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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Porsche 911 GT3 - Test Facility: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 - Test Facility: Video

How does Porsche ensure that every 2015 911 GT3 is properly put together and all of its systems are working properly? Well it has a huge testing facility of course. The facility is very German and very nerdy in all the ways that I love. Porsche has released a video that shows the testing facility in motion and it is amazing. Each car that comes through is fitted with special plastic body panels that are marked and padded to protect the cars, but I am sure the automaker also tests for panel inconsistencies.

While in the facility the cars have their gas tanks, and various reservoirs filled and tested, they have the wheels aligned, get a thorough visual inspection and more. Now sadly this video has no commentary so you are left to figure out what is happening on your own, but even with nothing but the hum and buzz of the dozens of machines and robots checking things over the video is fascinating to watch.

If you have ever wondered what extra steps each car goes through at Porsche to make sure it meets expected levels of quality, this is a great place to start. And no, I didn’t see a test for engine fires or missing PDK Sport buttons, so I am going to assume they got those parts worked out before they made this video.

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2015 Porsche 911 GT3 Delivered Without its PDK Sport Button

2015 Porsche 911 GT3 Delivered Without its PDK Sport Button

The 911 GT3 has been under a lot of scrutiny lately, given its tendency to, you know, catch on fire... But with deliveries back on schedule and 2015 models finding homes in owners’ garages, all is fine in the world of Porsche, right? Well, not quite, as apparently some of the workers at Porsche’s assembly plant felt that certain owners didn’t need a PDK Sport button (AKA the "go-fast" button).

That’s right, a 2015 Porsche 911 GT3 that an owner just picked up reportedly lacks one of the model’s key features. The news comes from a claim made by Rennlist user dadams1598, who got his beloved sports car home just to notice the PDK Sport button was missing. He even snapped a picture of the console (after the jump), which is where the button is supposed to be.

The missing button was discovered on December 14, 2014 and on December 24, the dealer made things right by special ordering the correct console with the PDK Sport button. Once the dealer receives the new console, it will install it and perform all of the necessary mapping to get his GT3 to its full potential. There’s still no explanation as to how the button got overlooked, but I’m certain Porsche will figure it out and fix the issue immediately.

What’s more, for those of you who think this is an isolated incident, there was a second claim made in the same thread of a missing PDK Sport button. The second issue has yet to be validated or resolved as of December 30, 2014, but I am sure he will get the same treatment as the first.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche 911 GT3.

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2015 Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. 2015 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28: Video

2015 Porsche 911 GT3 Vs. 2015 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28: Video

Even though not many people would ever consider cross-shopping the two, the bonkers Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 and the fantastic Porsche 911 GT3 (991) actually have much more in common than meets the eye. They are both mean the meanest track weapons you can buy from each of their brands’ stables and both can come with carbon ceramic brakes, dry-sump lubrication and bodykits inspired by thoroughbred racing cars.

Each is built according to a very different philosophy though, with Porsche’s result being the equivalent of modern laser surgery while the Chevy is like a lobotomy performed with a spoon. Still, despite using highly contrasting methodologies, both the 911 GT3 and the Camaro Z/208 aim to arrive at the same results: being road-going racing cars.

This type of titanium scalpel vs iron sledgehammer comparison is bound to upset a lot of fans from both the Chevy and the Porsche camps, especially since the track missile from Zuffenhausen costs almost twice than the muscle-car-turned-track-monster from Detroit. Not to mention that the Camaro is also more powerful and much more torquey for way less moolah.

Still, it’s not that hard to see where most of the extra money went into the GT3, as the model comes with features like a near-perfect PDK seven-speed dual clutch transmission, electronically-controlled rear-wheel steering and active engine mounts, all of which add up with a much better interior, a lower weight and faster lap times when the situation requires it. Despite knowing first hand which car will win the rather unequal comparison, Carlos Lago’s review of both models above must be watched even if it’s just for the amazing exhaust sounds and the gratuitous shots of both cars jumping over a crest in the road.

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Porsche 911 GT3 (991) Reviewed by Carlos Lago: Video

Porsche 911 GT3 (991) Reviewed by Carlos Lago: Video

Introduced back at the 2013 edition of the Geneva Motor Show, the latest Porsche 911 GT3 (991) brings quite a hefty amount of curious novelties compared with its previous generations, which were always known as the most racing-like 911s in the Porsche lineup at any given time. Things like active engine mounts are now accompanied by an electronically-controlled rear-wheel steering system and - for the first time ever – there is no manual gearbox, nor an electro-hydraulic steering.

While old-school Porsche purists probably frowned at the aforementioned additions, just like how many of them cancelled Porsche’s man card when the 911 finally switched to water-cooled engines, the truth is that the latest GT3 is still every bit of a man’s car. Sure it’s much less of a widow-maker than ever before, but by making it less dangerous, Porsche certainly didn’t make it less scary.

Its 3.8-liter flat-six now offers a banshee scream up to its stratospheric 9,000 rpm redline, while the rear-biased weight is still making it act like a pendulum during rapid left/right maneuvers.With 475 horsepower on tap from a naturally-aspirated engine which is paired with arguably the best dual-clutch transmission out othere, the new 911 GT3 is once again showing Porsche’s motorsport prowess in a road-going package. Sure, the model’s early 2014 recall for fiery engines put a slight dent in the model’s image, but this is still one of the most desirable Porsches in the current lineup.

Motor Trend’s Carlos Lago seems downright amazed by both the model’s capabilities and that amazing flat-six howl at higher rpm, while Randy Pobst’s GT3 shakedown on the Willow Spring circuit will probably fill you with joy as it achieves a lap time not much slower than the bonkers 918 Spyder. Isn’t this a great era for performance cars?

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Spy Shots: Porsche 911 GT3 RS Begins Winter Testing

Spy Shots: Porsche 911 GT3 RS Begins Winter Testing

It’s been nearly two months since we last saw the upcoming 911 GT3 RS testing on public roads. Last time it was spotted, the road-legal race car was resting in downtown Atlanta with very little camouflage covering its body. As we started wondering whether we’d see it again in 2014, our spy photographers made sure we don’t miss it until 2015 by sending a set of brand-new shots our way. As winter takes over most of Northern Europe, Porsche engineers had no choice but to hone the 911 GT3 RS in the snow. Although there’s no drifting on ice, the good news if the track-focused sports car is nearly free of camo.

Of course, there’s still a lot of mystery around the brand-new GT3 RS, mostly in regards to the engine fitted in the rear. On the other hand, with the official unveiling rumored to take place at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show in March, more details should surface over the next couple of months.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

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