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Porsche Panamera

Don't Like The Porsche Panamera? You've Got Other Spicy Options To Consider

Don’t Like The Porsche Panamera? You’ve Got Other Spicy Options To Consider

Take a look at a couple German cars and one American that I think are better than the Panamera

So the new Porsche Panamera has finally been unveiled, and everybody from Porsche itself to official media outlets, are treating the car like it’s the best thing to come since the invention of toilet paper. In all reality, the car is pretty sweet in its own regard. It’s a fair evolution of the previous model, comes with a great sound system and that sweet retractable spoiler. Plus, who can argue with a 440-horsepower V-6 or a 550-horsepower V-8 or the fact that the car emerged dominate on the Nürburgring? Well, the fact’s may be there, but it doesn’t change the fact that the Panamera, in my opinion, looks like someone drove one Porsche 911 up the ass of another and called in a Panamera.

That might sound a little harsh, but take a look at the car as a whole. The rear end, minus a few little details here and there – like the overall shape of the fascia and the location of the exhaust outlets – looks like the rear end of a 911. So, I look at the Panamera like a four-door 911. I’m sure I’m not the only person out there that feels this way.

The new Panamera starts out at $99,900 for the 4S and $146,900 for the Turbo, which, for the “fastest luxury sedan on earth” doesn’t seem like a bad price. But, what if you’re like me and don’t want to spend your $100,000 or $150,000 on a car like the Panamera? There are certainly other options out there, and that’s what we’re going to talk about today.

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Cars That the Porsche Panamera Defeated At Nurburgring

Cars That the Porsche Panamera Defeated At Nurburgring

A long list of Lambos, Ferraris, and Chevys put to shame

Porsche just introduced the second-generation Panamera in June 2016, and even though the sedan made its debut outside a major auto show, it arrived with a bang thanks to its outstanding Nurburgring lap.

Setting benchmarks at the "Green Hell" has become quite the trend in the last decade, with nearly every mainstream automaker flexing their muscles on the German track with their latest high-performance vehicles. And while Radical’s 6:48-minute record continues to stand strong since 2009, the Top 20 list sees many changes throughout the calendar year as new models hit the market.

In recent years, Porsche has filed about 10 Nurburgring laps, mostly with various versions of the 911 and supercars such as the Carrera GT and 918 Spyder, all with impressive results. In 2016, the Germans submitted their second ’Ring lap for a vehicle that’s not a coupe and set the quickest time for a production sedan. Specifically, the new Panamera Turbo needed only 7:38 minutes to run the Nurburgring Nordschleife, smashing the nameplate’s previous record by no fewer than 18 seconds.

More impressively, the second-gen Panamera also lapped the "Green Hell" a second quicker than the Alfa Romeo Giulia QV, the previous record holder, and a number of respectable sports cars.

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Check Out The Tech In The New Porsche Panamera

Check Out The Tech In The New Porsche Panamera

Stuttgart’s second-gen sedan is packed with gadgets, but is it more of the same?

Porsche just dropped details on the 2018 Panamera, a four-door that supposedly combines the comfort and practicality of a luxury sedan with the speediness of a thoroughbred sports car. All opinions aside, that kind of combination requires a good deal of technology to make it work correctly, and of course, Porsche says the new Panamera brings the goods. But the question is – does it really?

When it comes to innovation in the pursuit of lap times, Porsche certainly knows what it’s doing. But the Panamera is supposed to be more than a track monster. It’s also supposed to be a mile-munching GT car with some semblance of practicality, which can make for a rather tricky balancing act. Throw in a price tag of $101,040 for the base-model Panamera 4S, and you’re left with one very pricey jack-of-all-trades.

So then – what’s the new Panamera bring to the table in terms of technology, both in the cabin, and under the hood? Read on to find out.

Continue reading to learn more about the technology in the new Porsche Panamera.

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Porsche Panamera Wagon – Practical Speed, Or Expensive Façade?

Porsche Panamera Wagon – Practical Speed, Or Expensive Façade?

New style, same problem

Full disclosure – I love wagons. Hell, I drive one in real life. You know, outside. Any time an automaker produces a wagon instead of another SUC, er I mean SUV, I’m usually one of the first to stand up and shake the ‘ole pompoms. Make the thing fast, and well, I couldn’t be happier. Which should make me a dead ringer for loving the Panamera Wagon, right? Not exactly. For some reason, the upcoming hatch from Stuttgart hasn’t sat right with me. For a while, I wasn’t sure why – yeah, it isn’t “pretty,” but I wouldn’t consider any modern Porsche “pretty,” at least not in the traditional sense. No, the problem here goes deeper. The problem I have isn’t really with the Panamera Wagon, or the way it looks… it’s with the people who would buy such a thing.

I understand the image you’re going for when you buy a Panamera five-door – first off, it’s a Porsche, so you know its fast, and with an MSRP that starts dangerously close to six-figures, it should be comfortable, too. Second, it’s a wagon, so it should be practical, with lots of space for people and things.

From track days to road trips, apexes to Home Depot runs, the Panamera Wagon should do it all. The problem is, it probably won’t.

Sure, the capability will be there, but the people who’ll buy this thing don’t really care about that. The selling point here is image, not reality. The idea that you could drive three hours to the racetrack, post a fast time, then pick up some lumber on the way home is far more important than actually, you know, doing it.

Still with me? Read on to see what I’m talking about.

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2019 Porsche Panamera Coupe

2019 Porsche Panamera Coupe

Is Porsche reviving the iconic 928?

The Porsche Panamera was introduced in 2009 as Porsche’s first-ever four-door sedan and the first non-SUV, front-engined car since 1995. Much like the Cayenne SUV, the Panamera shares styling cues with the iconic 911, which enables it to stay true to the brand’s heritage, despite being a significant departure from Porsche’s sports car roots. Initially criticized by purists for straying off the company’s path, the Panamera followed in the footsteps of the Cayenne and became a popular choice with luxury car enthusiasts. The sedan carried over unchanged until 2013 when it received a facelift that included minor design changes, a new twin-turbo engine and hybrid model, and a long-wheelbase version.

Ever since the Panamera hit the market there were rumors that Porsche is looking to expand the lineup with several body styles, including a shooting brake and a coupe. While the shooting brake has already been previewed by a concept car and spotted testing as a prototype, the Germans made no official statements about the two-door. Come 2016 and our trusty paparazzi caught an awkward Panamera test car on the move and we might finally have proof that Porsche is indeed looking to launch a large luxury coupe.

Details are still under wraps and some say that these awkward looking prototypes might be mules for the upcoming Continental GT, which will share underpinnings with the second-generation Panamera, but we think Porsche is pulling the trigger on a coupe that will essentially revive the 928. Keep reading to find out more about what it may bring to the table, and stay tuned for updates.

Updated 06/14/2016: Based on the recent spy shots, we decided to create a rendering for the upcoming Panamera Coupe. Let us know what do you think about it in the comments section below.

Continue reading to learn more about the upcoming Porsche Panamera Coupe.

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Porsche Panamera Shooting Brake Will Make It To U.S. Shores

Porsche Panamera Shooting Brake Will Make It To U.S. Shores

So far you’ve seen our rendering and the spy shots of the upcoming Porsche Panamera Shooting Brake. Now, less than a month after the last round of spy shots, Automotive News has confirmed that the Panamera Shooting Brake will be coming to the U.S. Of course, this is despite the fact that we Americans don’t show as much interest in Wagons or Hatchbacks as those in other parts of the world.

In a press event at Automotive News, Klaus Zellmer – the CEO of Porsche Cars North America – said, “We have to have some patience for [the wagon] to arrive in the U.S. But, we are confident that this car will be well received here, despite the fact that this country doesn’t really like hatchbacks or wagons.” He didn’t give any specific timeline, but he did acknowledge that it won’t happen in 2017.

If you look back at the timetable for the Panamera Sedan, it debuted last September at the Paris Auto Show and went on sale in Europe shortly afterward. So, even though we don’t have a specific timetable, we know the second-generation Panamera Sedan should make it to the U.S. in 2017. That means that a 2018 debut for the shooting brake isn’t out of the question. For now, all we can do is wait for Porsche to bring the sedan and the shooting brake to the U.S. market. Hopefully, we don’t have to wait until 2019 for the Shooting Brake to cross the pond.

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Porsche's GT5 Trademark: What Could It Be?

Porsche’s GT5 Trademark: What Could It Be?

News that Porsche was given a trademark for the GT5 name in May 2015 gave birth to rumors that Weissach might be planning to launch a new high-performance model in the future. The big question here is what Porsche model will get the GT5 badge?

It’s quite the mystery, as the iconic 911 has had the GT3 name for more than a decade, and the Cayman has just received a GT4 version. Moreover, the Boxster, also rumored to get a GT variant, regained its Spyder iteration, which is pretty much a GT4 without a rear wing. Squeezing a Boxster GT4 into the current lineup would be next to impossible. This leaves us with only three existing models that have yet to spawn GT versions, none of which are sports cars. I’m obviously talking about the Panamera sedan and the Cayenne and Macan SUVs.

But do any of these performance family cars really need a GT5 version with a bigger focus on track performance? After all, the Panamera and the Cayenne are already available in GTS specification, while the Macan is likely to get one too.

Could Porsche use this new trademark for a brand-new nameplate or an upcoming four-cylinder version of an already existing car? Obviously, there’s more than just one scenario here. We decided to have a closer look at them and decide which might make better sense for the GT5 trademark. Also, each of the speculative models below come with their very own rendering courtesy of our talented artist.

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2018 Porsche Panamera Caught On The Road: Video

2018 Porsche Panamera Caught On The Road: Video

Although it isn’t due to arrive Stateside until 2017, the next-generation Porsche Panamera keeps losing camouflage with each public appearance. We made contact with some of the sedan’s new exterior features in January 2015, when the Panamera traveled to Sweden for some cold winter testing, and now we stumbled across a new video showing the car with far less camouflage stuck to its body.

Unfortunately, the footage showing a black Panamera passing quite fast in front of the camera is not too revealing. But while small details may be hard to distinguish, the short clip does confirm that the next-gen sedan is both sportier and more elegant than its predecessor. A closer look also reveals beefier wheel arches, a reshaped C-pillar, and what appears to be a longer rear door.

What you can’t see in the video but we already know for a fact is that the second-gen Panamera rides on Volkswagen’s MSB platform, which enabled Porsche engineers to make the new sedan about 200 pounds lighter than the outgoing model. Under the hood, look for an array of six-cylinder engines, a newly developed, twin-turbo V-8, and an updated hybrid drivetrain. What’s still a mystery is whether the Panamera GTS will continue with a naturally aspirated mill or not.

Keep it locked here for more details, we’ll be right back as soon as we have them.

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Porsche Trademarks GT5 Name

Porsche Trademarks GT5 Name

Porsche as thus far refused to comment on it, but we now know that the German sports car maker has been given a trademark for the GT5 name. And since there is no official word, that means we get to engage in our favorite gearhead hobby: wild speculation. This seems like it should be a pretty straightforward thing to figure out. Porsche said recently that there will be no GT version of the Panamera, or of any SUV. Moreover, Porsche has a strict brand hierarchy, and since the Boxster slots in under the Cayman and 911, a Boxster GT5 should slot in below the Cayman GT4 and 911 GT3 in the exact same way.

But it might not be that simple. The GT4 and GT3 aren’t arbitrary names; they correspond with FIA classifications for GT racing. There is no FIA GT5, so the moniker won’t correspond with anything, and therefore won’t be locked to any specific sort of car. So even though we’ve been told there won’t be a Panamera GT, there is still the possibility of a Pajun GT5. Or even, unusual as the naming structure would be for Porsche, a 918 GT5.

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Porsche Works On Improved Cornering Cruise Control

Porsche Works On Improved Cornering Cruise Control

Most autonomous automotive technologies offer convenience and safety, but none really have what it takes to provide a heady dose of adrenaline. Porsche is looking to change that with an adaptive cruise control system that can corner with lateral acceleration forces of up to 0.7 g, and surprisingly, it’s all in the name of greater efficiency.

It’s called the InnoDrive system, and Car And Driver says it’ll reach consumers within the next five years. Porsche is currently developing it on twisty two-lanes in Germany, and it uses data on the road elevation gradient and corner radius (stored in the car’s navigation system) to accurately execute throttle and brake input for Stig-perfect turns. While the computer takes care of the stop and go, all the driver has to do is steer. Passengers can select three different lateral limits, up to a top setting of 0.7 g.

How does hard cornering translate into greater efficiency? Carrying more speed in a turn not only equates to less time on the road, but less time braking and accelerating as well. What’s more, the system is able to keep the engine running at just the right rpm for max bang for your buck when it comes to fuel economy. All told, Porsche says InnoDrive can decrease fuel consumption by 10 percent, while decreasing drive time by two percent.

Higher speeds and more money saved at the pump? Yes please.

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Porsche Plans Electric Competitor For BMW 5 Series

Porsche Plans Electric Competitor For BMW 5 Series

Porsche is currently working on a new four-door that will offer both hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell drivetrain options. The car will incorporate a revised structure based on the future eMSB architecture, which will also be used for upcoming Bentley models and the new Panamera. It’s known internally as the Pajun, or “Panamera Junior,” and is slated to compete with the BMW 5 Series at the upper end of the mid-size sedan market. Speculation places its arrival sometime between late 2017 and early 2018.

The news was revealed by a series of patents filed in Germany, China, and the U.S., as analyzed by the UK-based publication Autocar. Ulrich Hackenberg, who’s responsible for technical development at Volkswagen Group, also dropped tantalizing hints at a press conference prior to Volkswagen’s annual conference in March. 

Exact specifications are sparse, but it’s believed the new electric Porsche will bring with it at least 420 horsepower and a 265-mile range, making it a direct competitor to Tesla. It’s also speculated that the battery-powered version will be called the 718, while the fuel-cell model will be designated the 818.

Autocar says an examination of the patents reveal that Porsche has re-engineered the MSB platform to incorporate the new drivetrain into the rear of the structure itself, improving rigidity and rear-impact crash-worthiness. It’s similar to the design used in the 2016 Audi R8 e-tron, and would retain an independent rear suspension and utilize a single electric motor for each rear drive wheel, offering torque vectoring for improved cornering abilities. The package will be mounted low, which also means the car should have some space for storage in the back. 

Continue reading to learn more about Porsche’s future electric sedan.

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2016 Porsche Panamera Edition

2016 Porsche Panamera Edition

Though it didn’t receive the warmest of welcomes from Porsche faithful when it debuted in 2010, the Panamera has become an accepted cog in the carmaker’s wheel. Between it and Porsche’s SUVs, the German brand makes the money it needs to fund awesome rigs like the 918 and the 911 GT3. For the 2016 model year, Porsche has added a new version of the Panamera that it has dubbed the “Edition.” Despite its weird name, the Panamera Edition adds a lot of value at a price that is only slightly north of the base model’s MSRP.

With tons of standard features and only a slight price hike, this is likely to be a hot seller in the next year. However, while this all looks great compared to the base Panamera, does this new Edition trim match up well against the likes of the BMW 740i or the Audi A8?

Continue reading my full review of the 2016 Porsche Panamera Edition to find out.

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