• 2018 Porsche Carrera T
  • Optimized spoiler lip
  • Agate Gray highlights
  • Lightweight rear windscreen and side windows
  • Lowered suspension
  • 9 exterior colors
  • Optional bucket seats with rear-seat delete
  • Lightweight door handles and insulation
  • Shorter gear lever
  • GT Sport leather steering wheel
  • 8 interior options
  • Standard rear differential lock
  • 11 pounds lighter than base model
  • A tenth-second quicker to 60 mph
  • Optional rear-axle steering

Base Carrera with GTS features, inspired by the original 911T

The Porsche 911 has gone through some big changes in the last couple of years, with the most important being Porsche’s decision to replace all naturally aspirated engines with turbocharged counterparts. While this was rather disappointing to some die-hard fans, it brought enhanced performance and fuel economy across the entire lineup. Porsche also revived the GT2 nameplate after a long absence and created the 911 R, essentially a limited-edition, wingless version of the GT3 for purists. Come 2017 and the German firm is offering yet another model aimed at purists and 911 Classic enthusiasts, but this time around is a significantly more affordable package. It’s called the 911 Carrera T and slots between the base Carrera and the GTS.

Inspired by the 911T, the company’s entry-level 911 between 1967 and 1973, the Carrera T is essentially a base Carrera with features taken off the more performance-oriented GTS. Fitted with a unique design elements inside and out, the Carrera T is also the first Carrera to get full bucket seats and rear-axle steering. The Carrera T is also lighter than the standard model, which makes it the lightest 911 available outside the GT3 and GT2 range. The added features and the lighter curb weight also makes it a tad quicker than the entry-level Carrera, placing it just below the Carrera S model in terms of performance. So while it’s not the least powerful and most affordable 911, as the 911T was back in the late 1960s, it’s a solid proposition for customers who want a no-nonsense Carrera but also desire access to the performance-enhancing features usually offered with the GTS model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 Carrera T.

Official video

Exterior

- * Optimized spoiler lip
- * Agate Gray highlights
- * Lightweight rear windscreen and side windows
- * Lowered suspension

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 739972
Up front, the 911 T is identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip

A 911 Carrera at heart, the T model has a hard time standing out in a pack of base 911 sports cars. Up front, the 911 T is actually identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip. And even though it may sound fancy, this feature is actually not so different design-wise, which makes it difficult to spot. But there is one way to tell that a T isn’t a regular 911 Carrera, even when looking at the front end: the SportDesign mirrors are finished in Agate Grey, whereas the standard Carrera has them painted in the same color as the body.

More hints that this is a different model can be found on the sides, starting with the 20-inch, Carrera S wheels in Titanium Grey with a stripe bearing the "T" designation. A black stripe just above the side skirt contains "911 Carrera T" lettering. Finally, the coupe sits nearly half an inch closer to the ground thanks to the standard PASM sport suspension, but this isn’t exactly noticeable.

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior
- image 739958
The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass

A few extra features can be spotted around back as well. The louvers of the decklid grille, the badge, and the "911 Carrera T" lettering are all finished in Agate Grey, while the sport exhaust system has black tips. The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass. Granted, the latter doesn’t change the way this 911 looks, but makes quite a different in the power-to-weight department. But more on that in the "Drivetrain" section below.

Paint options for the 911 Carrera T are as varied as they get and include Lava Orange, Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, White and Miami Blue. Metallic colors like Carrera White, Jet Black, and GT Silver are optional. It’s pretty cool that Porsche is offering Lava Orange, a color first launched with the GT3 RS, for 911 Carrera model.

left right

Interior

- * Optional bucket seats with rear-seat delete
- * Lightweight door handles and insulation
- * Shorter gear lever
- * GT Sport leather steering wheel

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Interior
- image 739964
It's the first 911 Carrera available with the Full Bucket Seats package

The interior of the 911 Carrera T is actually a bit more exciting than the exterior, combining a range of race-inspired features that you can’t get on the standard Carrera. The coupe comes equipped with Sport Seats Plus as standard. These four-way electrically adjustable seats are finished in black, have "911" logos embossed on the headrests, and center sections made of Sport-Tex. But the big news lies in the fact that you can order the Full Bucket Seats package, a first for the 911 Carrera designation. The option also comes with a rear-seat delete to save even more weight.

Speaking of weight-saving measures, the standard door handles have been replaced with fabric loops. The cool thing about these is that they also give the door panels a race-inspired look. Further weight is saved by use of thinner sound insulation under the skin. This is Similar to the 911 GTS and yes, it makes the cabin a bit louder. But hey, it’s a sacrifice you have to make if you want a quicker Carrera without the GTS premium.

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Interior
- image 739959
Shorter gear lever
A shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red is standard

Porsche also added a GT Sport steering wheel with leather rim and a switch for driving mode selection, as well as a shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red. The trim on the dashboard and doors is black, which isn’t particularly exciting, but the Carrera T Interior Package adds contrasting colors in Racing Yellow, Guards Red or GT Silver. The latter add colored accents to the seat belts, the "911" logo on the headrests, the door opener loops, and the Sport-Tex seat surfaces.

Drivetrain

- * Standard rear differential lock
- * 11 pounds lighter than base model
- * A tenth-second quicker to 60 mph
- * Optional rear-axle steering

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 739977
The Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera

The Carrera T draws its juice from the same 3.0-liter flat-six unit as the base 911 model. The turbocharged engine cranks out 370 and 332 pound-feet of torque, which is again identical to the entry-level model. Well, comparing specs on Porsche’s American website actually revealed there’s an extra pound-foot for the Carrera T, but that’s either a typo or it doesn’t make a difference in terms of performance. However, the standard manual transmission has a shorter constant transaxle ratio, while the mechanical rear differential lock is included at no extra cost.

What’s more, the Carrera T tips the scales at 3,142 pounds due to the weight-saving measures, which makes it 11 pounds lighter than the base Carrera and the lightest non GT 911 model available. Combined with the revised transmission, the PASM sport suspension, and the slightly lighter curb weight, the Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start, a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera. Top speed is rated at an exciting 182 mph.

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior
- image 739992
Standard rear differential lock
Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering

When equipped with the optional PDK transmission, which also adds a launch control feature, the Carrera T completes the same benchmark in four seconds flat, which is not only quicker than a similarly equipped base Carrera, but also a tenth-second faster than the more powerful Carrera S with a manual transmission. Top speed for this model sits at 180 mph, a tad lower than the manual version.

Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering, which is a cool thing to have on a non Turbo car.

Drivetrain Specifications

Engine 3.0-liter flat-six
Horsepower 370 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 332 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 4.3 seconds
Top Speed 182 mph
Weight 3,142 LBS

Prices

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior
- image 739994

Pricing for the 911 Carrera T, which went on sale for the 2018 model year but won’t hit dealers until March, starts from $102,100, excluding the $1,050 delivery, processing and handling fee. That’s a $11,000 premium over the base 911 Carrera, which is reasonable given all the extra features. The T is also only $3,000 less than the Carrera S, which might be a problem if you like all that extra power. But hey, you’re getting a lot of GTS-specific stuff for nearly $19,000 less.

Porsche 911 Carrera T Manual $102,100
Porsche 911 Carrera T PDK $105,830

Competition

Mercedes-AMG GT

2018 Mercedes-AMG GT C Coupe High Resolution Exterior
- image 700634

Although it’s an entirely different animal as far as drivetrain layout goes, with the engine being mounted in front of the cabin, the AMG GT was developed as a competitor for the Porsche 911. While modern to look at, the coupe also has a vintage vibe to it reminding of the Mercedes-Benz grand tourers of the 1960s. So it’s actually very similar to the 911 from this standpoint. The interior is of the same variety, blending race-inspired features with luxurious amenities, fine materials, and a wide range of options. Under the hood, the German two-door hides a twin-turbo, 4.0-liter V-8. Upgraded for the 2018 model year, the base AMG GT comes with 469 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque, which is significantly more than the 911 Carrera T. With almost 100 extra horses at its disposal, you’d be tempted to think that the AMG GT is significantly quicker, but the difference is far from overwhelming. The sprint to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds, which is only a tenth-second faster than the Carrera T with the PDK. Of course, we’re talking about four tenths if compared to the manual variant, but you need to consider that the Merc is some $10K more expensive at $112,400.

Read our full story on the 2018 Mercedes-AMG GT.

Jaguar F-Type

2017 Jaguar F-Type High Resolution Exterior
- image 655250

Although not exactly a full-fledged competitor for the 911, the F-Type has what it takes to give Porsche’s finest a run for its money. The exterior design, credited to have helped revive the brand, is aggressive and downright gorgeous, while the interior is packed with premium features and state-of-the-art tech. Sure, it doesn’t have rear seats, but given that the Carrera T can be had with a rear-seat delete, I think it’s a pretty fair comparison. Much like the 911, the F-Type can be had with a wide selection of drivetrains. In the U.S., the range begins with a 2.0-liter four-pot that cranks out 296 horsepower. That’s obviously not enough for the Carrera, especially since this model is significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph at 5.4 seconds. To get something closer, you have to go with the coupe fitted with the 3.0-liter V-6 rated at 400 horses and AWD. This one needs 4.9 seconds. Sure, it’s still slow, but the F-Type that’s next in line uses a massive 5.0-liter V-8. This one cranks out 550 horses and gets to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. The good news is that this model retails from $99,900, which makes it a bit more affordable than the 911 Carrera T.

Read our full review of the 2017 Jaguar F-Type.

Alpine A110

2017 Renault Alpine A110 High Resolution Exterior
- image 708518

Much like the F-Type, the A110 plays in a different league. Alpine did aim at Porsche with this car, but the smaller 718 Cayman. The reason why I’m including it here it’s because the A110 is a proper, no-nonsense sports car created specifically for the purist in you. Not only does it pay tribute to one of the greatest European sports car ever built, it also combined classic heritage with carbon-fiber, premium features, and a lightweight construction that puts a Porsche to shame. Tipping the scales at an incredible 2,381 pounds, the A110 is some 800 pounds lighter than the 911 Carrera T. Power is provided by a turbocharged, 1.8-liter four-cylinder rated at 252 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of twist. This may not seem like a lot compared to the 911 Carrera, but the solid power-to-weight ratio enables the A110 to hit 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. That’s still slower than the Porsche, but not by much. The good news is that the Alpine is significantly more affordable at under €60,000 (around $70,400 as of October 2017) in Europe, but the bad news is that it’s not available in the United States and there’s no word as to when it will cross the pond.

Read our full story on the 2017 Alpine A110.

Conclusion

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior
- image 739967
Optional rear-axle steering

Diversification is key to success nowadays and it’s probably why I’m not surprised that Porsche rolled out yet another version of the 911. However, I’m not really sure that the Carrera T was a necessary addition to the lineup. Sure, having a base Carrera with some GTS features is a cool idea that should appeal many enthusiasts in need of a purist sports car, but I have strong doubts that the Carrera T will be a high seller. Linking this coupe to the 1968 911T is also a nice thing to do, but it’s not exactly very similar to its ancestor. While the 911T was the entry-level 911, the new Carrera T slots between the base model and the GTS and costs almost as much as the Carrera S. But I guess these details don’t make much of a difference since the 911T isn’t among the most iconic versions of the 911.

  • Leave it
    • Almost as expensive as the Carrera S
    • Do we actually need the Carrera T?

Porsche 911T History

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T
- image 740173
The 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations

Introduced in 1967, there years after Porsche had launched the iconic nameplate, the 911T was the most affordable version of the 911. The concept wasn’t exactly new. When production of the 356 came to an end in 1965, Porsche noticed that there was still a market for a four-cylinder car, especially in the United States, so the German firm created the 912, a 911 with less equipment and the 356’s 90-horsepower engine. The 912 was kept into production until 1967, when it was replaced by the 911T, which slotted under the 911L and later the 911E.

Unlike the 912, the 911T used a flat-six engine. The first version was sold with the base 2.0-liter rated at 110 horsepower, but a 1969 upgrade replaced it with a 2.2-liter mill that generated 123 horses, 30 horsepower less than the 911E and 57 less than the 911S. The engine was again upgraded for all models, including the 911T, to a 2.4-liter unit in 1971. But unlike the 911E and 911S, which used mechanical fuel injection, the 911T was carbureted. However, this wasn’t the case in the United States, where regulations forced Porsche to also add fuel injection to the T model. The output was rated 130 horsepower in Europe, while the fuel-injection U.S. model came with 140 horses on tap. In January, 1973, North American 911T engines were switched to Porsche’s then-new K-Jetronic Continuous Fuel Injection system from Bosch. These CIS-powered cars are were among the last 911Ts built and are usually referred to as 1973.5 models by enthusiasts.

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 739960

While not as iconic as other versions of the classic 911, the 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations. The 911T is somewhat widely available in the U.S. right and if often considered a great starting point for collectors that want a first-generation Porsche 911. Prices vary depending on mileage and condition from as low as $40,000 to more than $120,000.

References

Porsche 911

2017 Porsche 911
- image 701926

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 911.

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS Exterior Wallpaper quality
- image 739165
Mid-/rear-mounted 2.5-liter flat-four engine

Read more Porsche news.

Press release

Porsche is reinvigorating the concept of the puristic 911 T model from 1968 with the new 2018 911 Carrera T. With less weight, a manual transmission with a shorter constant transaxle ratio, and a standard mechanical rear differential lock, performance and driving pleasure are heightened. The 911 Carrera T ("T" stands for Touring) is also equipped with several performance-enhancing features that are not available on the standard 911 Carrera. This includes the PASM Sport Suspension with a 0.39-inch (10 mm) lower ride height, a shortened gear lever with an embossed shift pattern in red, and seat centers made of Sport-Tex material. Rear-axle steering is not available for the standard 911 Carrera but is an option for the 911 Carrera T.

Based on the 370 hp 911 Carrera Coupe, the new model features unique design elements. The 911 Carrera T is equipped to be light and sporty: The rear windshield and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass, and door opener loops on the inside replace the conventional door openers. Similar to the 911 GTS models, sound insulation has been reduced. Weighing 3,142 pounds, the 911 Carrera T is the lightest model in the 911 Carrera range.

Dynamic exterior design with unique features
The design of the 911 Carrera T underscores performance. The 911 Carrera T is fitted with an aerodynamically optimized front spoiler lip that comes with the PASM Sport Suspension. The SportDesign exterior mirrors are painted in Agate Grey. The vehicle’s side profile features 20-inch Carrera S wheels painted in Titanium Grey and a stripe bearing the model designation. The louvers of the rear decklid grill, the Porsche logotype, and the model designation "911 Carrera T" are finished in Agate Grey. The standard Sport Exhaust System with black exhaust tips characterizes the rear of the car. Paint options of Lava Orange, Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, White and Miami Blue as well as the metallic colors Carrera White, Jet Black and GT Silver are available.

Purist interior concept and new interior package
The 911 Carrera T is fitted with black 4-way electrically adjustable Sport Seats Plus with seat centers in Sport-Tex. The headrests are embroidered with a black "911" logo. When ordered with the optional Full Bucket Seats (available on a 911 Carrera model for the first time), rear seats are deleted. The GT Sport Steering wheel with leather rim, also standard, comes fitted with a switch for driving mode selection. The shortened gear lever with shift pattern embossed in red is reserved for the 911 Carrera T. The interior trim on the dashboard and doors is in black as are the door opener loops. The Carrera T Interior Package is new: With available contrasting colors in Racing Yellow, Guards Red or GT Silver, it provides additional colored accents via the seat belts, the "911" logo on the headrests, the door opener loops, and the seat centers made of Sport-Tex.

Improved power-to-weight ratio and performance
The twin-turbo 3.0 flat-six engine develops 370 hp and 339 lb-ft of torque, the latter of which is available in a broad range between 1,750 and 5,000 rpm. Thanks to the manual transmission with a shorter constant transaxle ratio and the mechanical rear differential lock, the 911 Carrera T accelerates from zero to 60 mph in 4.3 seconds, 0.1 second quicker than the standard 911 Carrera. The manual version reaches a top track speed of 182 mph. When equipped with the optional PDK transmission, the 911 Carrera T reaches 60 mph in 4.0 seconds using the standard launch control feature and has a top track speed of 180 mph.

Pricing and availability
The 2018 911 Carrera T is now available for ordering and is expected to reach U.S. dealers by March 2018. The base MSRP is $102,100, excluding the $1,050 delivery, processing and handling fee.

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