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The Iconic Porsche 962 C Has Been Restored to its Original Condition

The Iconic Porsche 962 C Has Been Restored to its Original Condition

The 962 C played a pivotal role in the development of the PDK transmission and has been brought back to its former glory after 18 grueling months of work

Porsche has refurbished a very special 962 C. The car seen here is chassis #009, which was completely restored to its original state by the Heritage Department and the Porsche Museum over the course of 18 grueling months.

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Check Out These Ultra-Rare Porsche Racing Cars on Display at the Petersen Museum

Check Out These Ultra-Rare Porsche Racing Cars on Display at the Petersen Museum

Luftgekühlt along with the Petersen Museum is exhibiting a couple of Racing Porsches which include some 962s and the 956

The Miller 962 that clinched the Rolex Daytona 24 hours back in 1989 and the Coke-liveried 962 are among the seven cars on display in the Petersen Vault, which is open through November 19 this year.

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Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Parts 1 & 2

Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Parts 1 & 2

It’s no mystery that Porsche has built some of the most fascinating sports and race cars the world has seen since the late 1940s. Some of these vehicles took years to develop and had numerous prototypes that preceded them. Some of them are already famous, while Porsche kept others under wraps until the 21st century. Now, after decades of silence, the Germans are revealing their full lineup of prototypes and concept cars in a new exhibit at the Porsche museum.

The exhibit goes by the name "Project: Secret!" and includes 14 projects Stuttgart engineers have worked on in the past. Test mules, prototypes, concept cars or plain design studies that helped the Germans develop and create the production cars we’re all familiar with.

You probably recall the front-engine 924 that Porsche offered from 1976 through 1998. But did you know Porsche also built a 924-based world-record car? The project came to an abrupt halt before being finished, but the vehicle still exists. Then there’s the 959 C29, an early prototype that helped Porsche engineers come up with the outstanding aerodynamic properties of the mighty 959.

Did Porsche’s first sedan, the Panamera, take you by surprise when it hit the road in 2009? Then you probably don’t know the company pondered the idea of a 911-based sedan from the late 1980s. That’s how the 1991 Porsche 989 concept was born, a study that didn’t make it to production, but end up inspiring the design of the 996-generation 911. These are just a few of the previously unknown vehicle included in the "Project: Secret!" exhibit. Watch the videos for more intriguing prototypes the manufacturer has been hiding all these years.

One more video after the jump.

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Video: Meet Porsche's First 911 Turbo

Video: Meet Porsche’s First 911 Turbo

The Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany holds many of the automaker’s treasures. The likes of which we won’t see any where in the world. One of them is Louise Piëch’s 911 Turbo, which was given to her as a birthday present. And the above video puts this car in the spotlight.

Who is Louise Piëch, and why is her 911 Turbo in the Museum?

First of all, Louise Piëch is the daughter of Porsche founder Ferdinand Porsche. She is also the mother of current Volkswagen chairman Ferdinand Piëch, making her a pretty big deal inside Porsche’s world.

So why is her 911 Turbo so special? It’s because that specific 911 Turbo is considered the very first example of the model.

It was produced in 1973, one year before Porsche officially released the 911 Turbo. The 911 Turbo has since become the crown jewel of a lineup that has no shortage of awesomeness.

This video is the story of the first 911 Turbo, a car that ironically didn’t have a Turbo badge because Piëch apparently didn’t want to draw any attention to it. She also didn’t like anything obstructing her natural view of the environment; so at her behest, Porsche didn’t add tint on the car’s windows.

One thing she didn’t mind about the 911 Turbo was the power, as its 3.0-liter engine packed a healthy 260 horsepower. On top of that, the first 911 Turbo has quite the reputation for being rather challenging to handle, thanks to the slow spool and instant-on power once the turbocharger gets moving.

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NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Gmund Coupe

NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Gmund Coupe

While the three Type 64 cars ultimately were little more than an engineering exercise, it provided Porsche with the knowledge it needed to create the Type 356. The body shape was an extension of what Porsche began with the Type 64, and the teardrop shape still looks attractive to this day.

The birth of the Type 356 was not an easy one. With World War II raging, and Allied forces carpet bombing large portions of Germany, Porsche packed up and escaped to Austria. Porsche set up shop in an old sawmill in Gmund, Austria which is why the car carries its odd title.

Despite having packed up and moved to a sawmill, the 356 was still built using some of the most advanced materials and engineering possible. The bodies were all hand-hammered from sheet aluminum, and the chassis was a very stiff pressed-steel unit that was formed into a single unit with the floor. You could almost think of it as an early monocoque.

Beyond the futuristic production, the 356 featured full-independent suspension in all four corners. With that suspension setup and its lightweight, the Gmund Coupes were natural-born racers.

The car you see here is 356/2-017. It is number 17 to be produced and one of the oldest known living examples. While in Gmund, Porsche only managed to create a total of 50 to 52 Gmund Coupes (numbers are unreliable as to exact production). After those first 50, or so, cars were produced, Porsche returned to Stuttgart, ending the production of “Gmund” 356 models. Porsche still continued to make the 356 after it returned to Stuttgart and eventually produced around 76,000 of the cars in total.

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NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Speedster

NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Speedster

One of the most notable and memorable of the early Porsche cars is the Speedster. This car actually came into existence at the insistence of U.S. distributor Max Hoffman. He was able to convince Ferdinand Porsche that there was a market for a “stripper” car. A stripper is essentially a barebones Roadster that could be easily converted into a racing specification car without too much trouble. The low level of standard equipment also kept prices low, leaving you more budget for race gear and modifications.

This particular Black Speedster here carries a particularly special heritage. It was owned by none other than James Dean, twice. Dean bought the car to race in SCCA competition, but after a few years he sold it to a car collector named Bruce Meyers. Later in 1974 Dean bought the car back from Bruce. This particular model does not wear a Speedster badge as Dean had it removed from the car during his first ownership.

Porsche dropped the Speedster model from the 356 lineup in 1959 in favor of building the newer Convertible D cars. Only 3,122 of Speedsters were ever constructed.

When the cars first entered production there were powered by a 1.5-liter flat-four engine that produced 64 horsepower. Before the production ended, you could order a race-ready Carrera spec model with 128 horsepower. With the proper gearing in the transmission, a Speedster could reach speeds of over 125 mph, making it one of the fastest cars of the era.

Dean’s car here was a mid-range “Super” model that managed 88 horsepower from its 1.6-liter engine. The car is still in Dean’s family under the ownership of his son, Chad.

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New US Porsche Experience Center opens in fall 2013

New US Porsche Experience Center opens in fall 2013

The long-rumored Porsche Experience Center, located in Carson, California, has finally been approved. This will be the second Experience Center in the U.S. and will span a total of 53 acres. According to the first details we have on the project, it will include "a museum displaying historical vehicles, a business center, driving simulators, a high-end parts and service area, a restaurant, and a ’human performance center’ designed to train people like race car drivers."

The work on this project will begin at the end of the year and Porsche hopes to have it ready by fall of 2013. However, There is still a lot of work to do, considering they will need to clean up the former landfill site, raze the now-closed Dominguez Hills Golf Course, and demolish the vacant Don Dominguez Apartments.

It looks like this hard work will worth in the end, as the new Porsche Experience Center will also include two tracks — one measuring 2,500 feet and the second one about 5,000 feet. It will include areas where special surfaces replicate rain, ice, and snowy conditions. One of the driver-training sections is a 350-foot-long "Ice Hill," where a steep slope, computer-controlled water jets, and a low-friction surface will challenge even the most experienced drivers and help them improve their real-world skills.

The new Experience Center will also offer lots of activities for kids, track access, dining and conference spaces for car clubs, corporate clients, and other special groups.

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Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part Two

Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part Two

We pretty much just finished the Museum Secrets Part One video and Porsche has already graced us with part two of this awesome series. The Museum Secrets series is outlining the new storage facility for the Porsche Museum and also showing us a glimpse of some of the most awesome cars that pass through the museum.

Part One focused mainly on the storage facility and Porsche’s overall history, then showed us just one car, which was the first ever 911 Turbo. Part two, thankfully, focuses a lot more on the storage facilities contents – a ton of rare Porsches. The guys at Porsche outlined seven cars for us, some of which we never knew even existed.

The video’s pretty sweet and the cars are absolutely awesome, so check out the video. If you would like a quick peak at what’s in the video, click past the jump and you’ll see our quick summary on each car shown.

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Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part One

Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part One

Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg in Germany is the home of the Porsche Museum, which holds roughly 500 various Porsche models, some of which are the rarest Porsches in the world. In the same city is a secrete compound that Porsche has purchased to store its priceless pieces when they are not being displayed.

As you would expect, there are some very exciting models in this storage facility, including a family car that Porsche was experimenting with for the Chinese market. The above video is the first of a series that will go through the various cars in this storage facility and let you in on all of the little details on each vehicle.

This debut video basically has just enough time to outline the Porsche Museum and the storage facility, as well as one ultra-rare model. This model in question is the first ever Porsche 911 Turbo. This model was specially built as a birthday present to the daughter of Ferdinand Porsche, Louise Porsche. Unlike every other 911 Turbo, this model actually lacks the “Turbo” badge on the rear, something that she specially requested.

In all, this introductory video is pretty awesome, but we can’t wait for part two. The second part will include a wider array of vehicles stored in the facility, including: 996 Bulletproof, 906 Ollon-Villars Hill Climb, FLA Concept Study, 924 World Record Car, 928 Convertible Prototype, 908 Targa Forio, and 984 Porsche Junior.

Stay tuned, as we will drop the second video as soon as we get our hands on it.

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2012 Porsche Cayman S Facebook Edition

2012 Porsche Cayman S Facebook Edition

Facebook’s popularity has skyrocketed so it only makes sense for companies to take full advantage of the reach social media has to gain some attention for themselves. Porsche is diving into that headfirst with a special edition dedicated to the growing number of "fans" for their Facebook page. These images show a unique Cayman S decorated with the faces of Porsche’s first two million "fans."

Porsche sent out requests to their fans, asking permission to use their profile pictures as part of the design of the Cayman. Following this fan-based mosaic, the company went on to have their fans vote for their favorite historic racing livery. When the fans spoke, they chose the iconic Porsche 917 K with the red-white Salzburg livery, known best for delivering Porsche’s first overall victory in Le Mans with Richard Attwood and Hans Herrmann behind the wheel.

Porsche’s Cayman S tribute to their first two million Facebook fans will be on display at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart until January 27, 2012. If you look real close, maybe you’ll be able to find your picture!

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2011 Porsche 911 GT2 "Colección Goméz" Art Car

2011 Porsche 911 GT2 "Colección Goméz" Art Car

Art cars have become an integral part of the auto industry, and it doesn’t surprise us to find out that more and more models have been treated to some sort of artistic interpretation by artists from all over the world.

Recently, we found out that the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany was holding a special exhibition on a new collection of decorative hoods for the Porsche 911 GT2. The exhibit is called Colección Goméz after Argentinian curator Jorge Goméz, a man whose love for art is only matched by his love for Porsches.

To pay homage to his two passions, Porsche decided to enlist the services of 19 Latin American artists to create 24 dynamic hoods for the 911 GT2, each coming with their own unique designs. Every form of artwork - be it the simple variety or the meticulously designed - offered a different perspective on the artistic style of each of the artists that were involved in the project. Look at those hoods a little closer and you’ll notice that there’s a couple of nude artworks in there, as well as...Astroboy.

Not sure what he has to do with a Porsche, but nonetheless, you can’t deny the peculiarity of seeing a 911 GT2 with Astroboy on its hood.

In any case, the Colección Goméz will run until January 8, 2012 and is available for public consumption from Tuesdays through Sundays between 9 am to 6 pm. If you happen to be in Stuttgart from here until the new year, it’s definitely something that’s worth your time.

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Porsche Museum displays the 918 Spyder Concept Study

Porsche Museum displays the 918 Spyder Concept Study

After making its official debut at the Geneva Motor Show, the 918 Spyder Concept is on its way to the Museum of Dr. Ing. h. c. F. Porsche AG at Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen where it will be displayed starting October 1 through 7, 2010.

The 918 Spyder is powered by a V8 engine delivering more than 500 hp and three electric motors with overall output of 218hp. The engine emits just 70 grams CO2 per kilometer and has a fuel consumption of just 3.0 liters/100 kilometers (94 mpg imp). Despite this the car’s performances are impressive: the sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just under 3.2 seconds, top speed of 198 mph, and a lap time on the Nordschleife of Nürburgring in less than 7:30 minutes, faster than even the Porsche Carrera GT.

Press release after the jump.

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Porsche is sliced and diced and on display

Porsche is sliced and diced and on display

We have an idea! Let’s take aPorsche and chop it down the middle just to see what it would look like! Sound crazy? That’s because it is! We will admit to not understanding certain elements of art, but we think the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany has gone way too far. They not only sliced one, but many Porsches as a sick and twisted demonstration of the inner workings of this beautiful beast.

Okay, let’s regain some sort of composure here. Give us a second.
Now, albeit insanely demonic, the “modified” Porsches do serve an educational inside look at the design stages of building a Porsche. This exhibit consists of various stations that start with the clay models of the Porsche and end with the full on models being sliced open to reveal their guts. This artistic display even shows details such as the first aid kit and the seats being cut in half. The murder on display alone would not be highly educational, but the videos positioned at each station help that aspect with narrations of each stage of development.

Putting aside the immoral destruction of the galloping stud, this display may be kind of cool. It’s not every day you get to see this type of vehicle in such a different perspective. Of course, this is why we had to post these pictures for all to see. Tell us what you think.

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Porsche Type 64 to be exhibited at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

Porsche Type 64 to be exhibited at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta

Porsche fanatics – yes, we know that they are a lot of you – will be thrilled to know that the car Porsche considers as the “first ancestor of all Porsche sportscars” will be making its maiden voyage to the US where it will be prominently displayed at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia from March 21 to June 20.

The car, of course, is the Porsche Type 64, which if you must know, was developed back in 1938, making it the predecessor of sorts for the fabled Porsche 356. As a matter of fact, the Type 64 is so important to the history of the brand that just about every Porsche model created thereafter – from the 356 to the newest Porsche 911 - took its styling cues and construction methods from this very same car.

After being meticulously restored, the Type 64 sat in what Porsche describes as the “first and most prominent exhibit” since the company opened the new Porsche Museum in Zuffenhausen last year. The three-month trip to the US marks the first time the car will leave its safe confines to be exhibited at the High Museum of Art’s ‘The Allure of the Automobile’ exhibit.

It’s pretty easy to surmise that the history of Porsche can be traced to this one car, which makes it even more compulsory for all Porsche enthusiasts in the US to make the pilgrimage to Atlanta to see up close and personal the car that has shaped Porsche – literally and figuratively – to become the brand that it is today.

Press Release after the jump

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Porsche welcomes 500,000th visitor to the Porsche Museum; gives them a whole weekend with a Panamera

Porsche welcomes 500,000th visitor to the Porsche Museum; gives them a whole weekend with a Panamera

The Porsche Museum in Stuttgart has only been open for about 11 months but in that span, the museum has already attracted thousands upon thousands of visitors from all over the world.

We don’t know how they kept count, but Porsche recently announced that they’ve just welcomed its 500,000th visitor to the Museum of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG – or Porsche Museum, so as not to confuse anyone.

It’s a remarkable achievement for Porsche, which only opened its new state-of-the-art museum 11 months ago on January 31 of this year. The Rosenberger family was bequeathed with the distinction of becoming visitor no. 500,000 and Porsche will award them so kindly with a free high-power test drive of the brand’s new flagship luxury sports car, the Panamera, for an entire weekend.

We figured that Porsche should just give them the car, but we don’t make that decision. Nonetheless, taking it home for an entire weekend for all your friends and neighbors to see is a pretty sweet deal in itself.

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Porsche commemorates the 911 Turbo with special exhibit at the Porsche Museum

Porsche commemorates the 911 Turbo with special exhibit at the Porsche Museum

Porsche’s state-of-the-art museum in Stuttgart, Germany will have a special guest in the coming weeks in the form of the new 2010MY 911 Turbo. The exhibit, which will be held from November 21 to 29, will showcase the new 911 Turbo alongside some of its predecessors, in addition to the never-released prototype of the 911 Turbo, which, incidentally, was the same car that was used during the 911’s testing and development stage.

If the special exhibit isn’t enough to make Porsche enthusiasts wallop in excitement, the German automakers are also in the process of releasing a new coffee table book – the fourth one from Porsche’s in-house publishers – entitled, “Porsche Turbo Stories”.

The 224-page book will be available from the Porsche Museum shop for
around €15 in both English and German versions. The latest book from “Edition Porsche-Museum” chronicles the storied history of the 911 Turbo including the release of never-before seen photos of the sports car that were dusted off from the company’s archives. In addition to that, the book also highlights every 911 Turbo ever built – from the first 911 Turbo 3.0 that rolled off the lot in 1974 to the latest incarnation, which was revealed at the Frankfurt Motor Show.

If you’re a Porsche fanatic and you happen to be near the area from the 21st to the 29th, you have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to relive the history of one of the most iconic cars of our time.

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Porsche Museum visit

Porsche Museum visit

Porsche’s old museum at its headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany used to follow the maxim "Small but good", and a visit there proved it. The whole museum and gift shop was located in a space that was about the size of most company’s boardrooms. The clear benefit to the small area was every piece featured was significant. The huge drawback was that everyone who saw that museum knew there was huge piece of the company’s history missing.

Porsche did not ignore this problem. It spent over two years building the new museum, which opened its doors on January 31, 2008. When we made the visit earlier this month it still had the new museum smell.

This is the ultimate destination for any Porsche fan. It not only houses all the significant pieces from the company’s history, but also concept cars that have been long forgotten. Ever wonder what Butzi’s original design was for the 911? (pictured right) Or what a long-wheelbase 911 would look like? (orange car in the picture gallery)

The new museum gives Porsche the room it deserves. The multi-story complex features road cars, racecars and even an observation area into the restoration facility. Porsche is a celebrated carmaker, and its finally got the showcase it deserves.

Of course anyone taking the time to travel to Stuttgart wants to see the factory complex surrounding the museum (trust me, it’s worth it). Unlike the Leipzig facility, Porsche’s home factory is not available to everyone and takes some planning ahead. A good start is making friends with the local Porsche dealer.

Plenty more pics in the picture gallery after the jump.

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Porsche Museum

Porsche Museum

Stuttgart, Germany

Online: www.porsche.com/international/faq/museum/

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