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2020 Porsche 99X Formula E Electric Racer

2020 Porsche 99X Formula E Electric Racer

Porsche finally debuts in the arena of electric racers

Porsche returns to single-seater racing after a +30-year hiatus this year as it embarks on a new adventure in Formula E, the world’s top EV racing series. The factory-backed Tag Heuer Porsche Formula E team will field a pair of Porsche 99X Electric cars for Messrs Neel Jani and Andre Lotterer, both formerly part of the company’s LMP1 program. Expect to see this 335-horsepower red, white, and black beast battle at the sharp end of the field in the 2019-2020 season that’ll kick-off later this year.

Porsche halted its involvement in the FIA World Endurance Championship, where it raced in the top-flight LMP1 class with a pair of hybridized 1,000-horsepower prototypes, to race in Formula E. The German automaker will thus move forward in its quest towards electrification by competing in the first all-electric racing series in the world with a car powered by a 900-volt battery, just like the 2021 Taycan sedan. But you’d rather see Batman ride in this low-flying spacecraft than the Taycan and that’s why Porsche hopes to garner a new, younger, and tech-savvy crowd through its participation in the eco-friendly championship.

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2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

Now with a Trackday version for amateur racers!

The Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a track-only version of the 718 Cayman developed for customer use. It replaces GT4 Clubsport that Porsche introduced in 2015 and represents a notable update over the outgoing model. Unlike its predecessor, it’s offered in two distinct versions: Trackday and Competition. The GT4 Clubsport Trackday was built specifically for amateur racing drivers that like to spend weekends at the race track without participating in FIA events. The Competition model features a more complex suspension system, and it’s a direct replacement for the old GT4 Clubsport, as it is eligible for GT4-spec competitions in Europe, North America, and Asia. According to Porsche, the new race car features improved driveability, and it’s capable of quicker lap times.

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2018 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport Rallye Concept

2018 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport Rallye Concept

It Is A Rally Porsche. You Heard Me! A Rally Porsche!

Man, I can’t remember the last time I was as stoked about a rally car as I am about this one. Ever since the rally scene migrated from awesome sedans (Lancer Evo, WRX, or that magnificent Skoda Octavia), I was a bit disappointed watching small city cars tackling the courses. They are supremely fast, granted, but lack the drama, or the seriousness of the larger machines. Or sports cars. And that is where the newest Porsche Motorsport Rally concept comes into play. This is the Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport Rallye Concept. A mouthful isn’t it. Well, after I saw it the first thing I thought about was the 959 Dakar Porsche from the Eighties. It was sublime and, while the new Cayman GT4 Clubsport Rallye isn’t a 918 Rallye, I feel happy to have an opportunity to see it at all.

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1970 Porsche 908

1970 Porsche 908

Like a big racing kart

Introduced in 1968, the Porsche 908 was created as Stuttgart’s more-focused shot at competition success in the FIA’s Group 6 Prototype-Sports Cars class. The car is simple and completely stripped of any fluff whatsoever. Outside, the 908 gets a short, flat body made from fiberglass (both coupe and spyder variants were created), as well as simplified aerodynamics. The driver sits very far forward, his or her feet hanging ahead of the front axle to make room for the 3.0-liter flat-eight engine. With as much as 350 horses on tap, the 1,100-pound 908 was basically like a big racing kart, beating its heavier, more powerful competition on the twisty, more narrow tracks of the sports car series.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 908.

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2017 Porsche 911 RSR

2017 Porsche 911 RSR

Porsche’s new GTE fighter is ready for a successful season in 2017

Truth be told, Porsche did decent with its racing program for the 2015 FIA GTE season, but the German brand decided to sit out the 2016 season to prepare for 2017. Since we’ve last seen Porsche in GTE, the brand has been busy building its new GTE racer for the 2017 season. The new 911 RSR has been put through the paces on various tracks around the world, with a majority of the Porsche Works drivers getting behind the wheel at one time or another – a feat that’s quite rare in the development stage. But, it’s paying off well, and it looks like the new RSR is ready to take on the competition. It needed a break, though, so Porsche saw fit to show it off at the L.A. Auto Show, and boy does it look ready. With up to 510 horsepower on tap and, real driver assistance systems (a first,) and an improved body panel mounting, this racer will not only be ready to devour the competition and keep its driver safe, but can be serviced easily mid-race thanks new quick-release fasteners that are used for mounting a majority of the body panels.

On top of that, the Porsche gets an all-new body wrap. It still sports the traditional white, red, and black color scheme, but features the new factory design and, from a birds-eye point of view, showcases the silhouette of a Porsche emblem. Pretty cool, huh? In 2017, the new RSR will see some 140 hours of track time over 19 different outings in the FIA World Endurance Championship, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the well-respected IMSA Weathertech Championship. The new RSR has a lot of work ahead of it, but as you can see from the photos that we took at the L.A. Auto Show, it’s more than prepared.

With that said, let’s take a closer look at Porsche’s new racer before the 2017 season kicks off, and we’re too busy watching it fight on the track to pay attention to the finer details.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 RSR.

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2017 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

2017 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

One-make race car updated to 991.2 design and larger engine

The current-generation Porsche 911, known as the 991, was introduced in 2011. Penned by Michael Mauer, it features an evolutionary design and rides on an entirely new platform, only the third since the nameplate’s introduction back in 1963. In 2016, Porsche launched the so-called second-generation 991 (dubbed 991.2), essentially a facelift with revised exterior features and new drivetrains.

Along with the facelift, Porsche has developed a revised version of the current 911 GT3 Cup. Based on the RS, the GT3 Cup is a track-only vehicle that’s available to privateers competing in the one-make series that Porsche organizes globally. The new race car received exterior updates similar to the road-going 991.2 911, new safety features, and a brand-new engine under the hood.

Set to make its debut in the 2017 racing season, initially exclusively in the Porsche Mobile 1 Supercup and the Porsche Carrera Cup (in both Germany and North America), the revised 911 GT3 Cup will be built on the same production line as the standard road car. The basic race tuning will be performed at the Weissach motorsport centre, where vehicles are also thoroughly tested by professional race drivers prior to delivery to the customer. Keep on reading to find out what updates the new GT3 Cup has in store.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup.

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1966 Porsche 906

1966 Porsche 906

Porsche’s last road-going sports prototype

Widely known as Porsche’s last road-going sports prototype, the Type 906, also known as the Carerra 6, celebrates its 50th birthday in 2016 and, given its importance in Porsche’s racing history, a look back is by all means necessary. While not innovative in its own right, the 906 put the brand on a road that led, to the launch of the astounding 917 which, like many success stories, had somewhat humble beginnings.

The beginnings lay in Porsche’s Type 904, which was the last to contest the 2.0-liter GT championship in 1964 and 1965. It was rendered obsolete in only its second year by Ferrari’s Dino 206S. Porsche was forced to step up to the challenge and answered with the 906, which, under different guises, ran in the 2.0-liter class for either sports cars or prototypes. It was also the first Porsche to accommodate a long-tail (lang-heck in German) configuration for the Le Mans race alone. A number of updates kept the 906 popular among privateers up until the dawn of the 1960s at which time it was still competitive in the 2.0-liter class as the championship’s focus had shifted toward the 5.0-liter sports cars and the 3.0-liter prototypes, respectively.

Following Porsche’s ethos of learning from the past and applying it to the future, the 906 carried over the suspension and brakes from the 904. Otherwise, it was a completely new car down to its tubular space frame. In racing terms, the 906 was a success, scoring big from its debut onward, a highlight being the victory in the 1966 edition of the famed Targa Florio, which was run in pitiful conditions with rain and fog all the way.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 906.

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2016 Porsche 911 GT3 R

2016 Porsche 911 GT3 R

Porsche has just debuted a new 911 customer race car, and although the GT3 R isn’t a new nameplate, Porsche’s Byzantine model hierarchy and naming system requires us to first explain where the new car fits in. This is the fourth racing version in as many years since the unveiling of the current Type 991 generation of the 911. Starting first with the 991 RSR, then the 991 GT3 Cup, the 991 GT America and now the 991 GT3 R. But all of this looks more complicated than it is; the RSR is a racing version of the regular car, the GT3 Cup and GT America are both based on the GT3 road car, and were simply made for different racing series. And finally we have the GT3 R, which is based on the GT3 RS road car.

To put it more simply still: this is the current ultimate track-focused 911. And since Porsche worked hard to make the GT3 RS as close to a race car as possible while still being street legal, not all that much has really been changed. And the GT3 R is likely to share some race tracks with impatient GT3 RS owners who couldn’t wait and performed the modifications themselves.

Updated 05/25/2016: Porsche dropped a new video in which shows the 911 GT3 R getting ready for the 24 Hours at the Nürburgring. Hit "play" to watch it!

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 R.

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1972 Porsche 911 2.5 S/T

1972 Porsche 911 2.5 S/T

Porsche Classic brought this once forgotten beauty back to life in a major way

Every now and then, a good car slips through the cracks and ends up in the hands of an owner that doesn’t know how to properly care for it. That is exactly the case when it comes to this 1972 Porsche 911 2.5 S/T. According to Alexander Fabig, the man in charge at Porsche Classic, this 911 is one of only 24 ever produced. When it was delivered to Porsche Classic for “restoration,” however, it was clearly evident that someone failed to realize what a piece of history they possessed over the years.

The car had a good history, at least to start out with. It was purchased in 1971 by U.S. racing driver Michael Keyser and was used in several races in the U.S., as well as in the endurance world championship in 1972. It even ushered in a class win in the 1972 Le Mans circuit. It saw service in the Daytona 6 Hours and the Sebring 12 hours, and in the 24 hours of Le Mans, it claimed 13th place overall. What happened to this 2.5 S/T after that is somewhat of a mystery, but as you can see from a photo taken before restoration began, it clearly didn’t have a good run.

After an obviously rough life out in the wild, this 911 2.5 S/T was rediscovered by a U.S.-based collector, who came to Porsche Classic to have a complete restoration done. Against all odds and some very extensive work, this baby has been returned to its original operating condition, including the racing livery that it wore all those years ago. So, with that said, let’s take a look at this piece of Porsche racing history and talk a little about it.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1972 Porsche 911 2.5 S/T.

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2016 Porsche 919 Hybrid

2016 Porsche 919 Hybrid

Porsche’s new LMP1 racer is ready to hit the track

Developed between 2012 and 2013, the 919 Hybrid hit the track for the 2014 World Endurance Championship, marking Porsche’s return to top-tier racing since 1998. With a hybrid drivetrain that included a turbocharged V-4 engine, a rather awkward choice compared to what Audi and Toyota used in their prototypes, the 919 finished the 2014 WEC season third, managing to score only one win at Interlagos. At Le Mans, Porsche had to settle for 11th place. In 2015, the Germans returned with an improved version of the LMP1 and won five out of eight races, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans, winning the Manufacturers’ Championship ahead of Audi and Toyota. For 2016, Porsche has revised the 919 Hybrid once again in order to defend its WEC and Le Mans trophies.

Much like all updates for modern prototype race cars, the 2016-spec 919 Hybrid is far from being a radical departure compared to its predecessor. Both the aerodynamic package and the drivetrain are indeed different, but to the extent that they no longer share components with the previous design. With the 919 already a successful race car, Porsche focused on improving efficiency and and reducing curb weight rather than enhancing performance, mostly because new FIA restrictions force Porsche to use around eight percent less fuel and power throughout the 2016 season.

This season, Porsche’s Team will field two 919 Hybrids. Car No. 1 will be driven by 2015 champions Timo Bernhard, Mark Webber, and Brendon Hartley, while car No. 2 will be shared by Romain Dumas, Neel Jani, and Marc Lieb. Is the updated 919 good enough to defend its title? Find out more in our review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Porsche 919 Hybrid.

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1969 - 1971 Porsche 917K

1969 - 1971 Porsche 917K

Though it’s the most successful constructor at the 24 Hours of Le Mans with 17 overall wins as of 2015, Porsche had to wait until 1970 to score its first outright success at the Circuit de la Sarthe. It did so with the 917, a revolutionary race car that set many new benchmarks in sports car racing.

The 917 saga began in 1968, when the FIA, having announced that the International Championship of Makes would be run for 3.0-liter Group 6 prototypes from 1968 through 1971, allowed the participation of 5.0-liter Group 4 cars. Known for racing cars with small-displacement engines in lower classes, Porsche made a surprising move and decided to design a brand-new racer with a 4.5-liter unit for the top category.

With genius Hans Mezger as chief engineer, Porsche developed the 917 in only ten months, displaying all 25 homologation cars required by the FIA in front of its factory in April 1969.

The 917 spawned many iterations that would go on and compete in various series around the world, including the World Sportscar Championship and the Can-Am. In this review, I will focus on the 917K, the car that brought Porsche its first outright win at Le Mans.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 917K.

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2016 Porsche Cayman GT4

2016 Porsche Cayman GT4

A more affordable, mid-engined proposition to the 911 GT3

The second-generation Porsche Cayman was unveiled at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show and released as a 2014 model in the spring of 2013. Although redesigned from the ground up, the new mid-engined coupe remained recognizable as a Cayman and as a Porsche sports car in general. The interior also received new features and updated tech, while both the 2.7-liter and 3.4-liter flat-six engines were revised. A facelift unveiled in 2016 brought new turbocharged, flat-four powerplants and a name change that revived the classic 718 name.

Equally important is that the second-generation Cayman spawned the GT4, the first track prepped version of the mid-engined coupe and a proper equivalent to the already iconic 911 GT3.

Attention performance purists: your savior from Stuttgart has arrived. Porsche just unveiled the latest member of its GT family, officially inducting the Cayman into that illustrious batch of performance vehicles distilled to offer the most essential of driving characteristics. Unsurprisingly, this feat is accomplished with components pulled from the track-bruising 911 GT3, following the mid-engine sports-car formula perfected by cars like the 904 GTS, 911 GT1, Carrera GT, and 2014 918 Spyder.

Those are tough acts to follow, but the Cayman GT4 is no slouch. Porsche is claiming a lap around the North Loop of the Nürburgring in seven minutes and 40 seconds, placing it alongside the 2011 911 GT3 around the iconic German racetrack.

However, despite such a blistering pace, Porsche says it developed the engine, chassis, brakes, and aero to perform without hindering the overall utility expected of a two-seater sports coupe. That means this weapon of velocity should be somewhat drivable on surfaces without rumble strips and apex markers.

The rumor mill predicted everything from a turbocharged four-cylinder to a hybrid drivetrain for the Cayman GT4, but such complications remain mere hearsay. Read on to learn more about this latest mid-engine monster.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Cayman GT4.

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2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup "Designed for Dempsey" Edition

2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup "Designed for Dempsey" Edition

Patrick Dempsey may be best known for his role in Grey’s Anatomy, but the Hollywood actor is also an accomplished race car driver, having competed in prestigious pro-am events, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans, Rolex 24 at Daytona, and Tecate SCORE Baja 1000. He’s also a dedicated Porsche enthusiast, which explains why the German automaker was so keen on providing Dempsey’s racing team, Dempsey Racing, with a pair of Porsche 911 GT race cars to use in the current season of the Tudor United Sports Car Series.

The extent of the Dempsey-Porsche bromance also extends to the Brazil stage of the Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge on November 9, 2014 where Dempsey will be competing in a fan-designed 911 GT3 Cup.

Fan-designed? Yep. Porsche and Dempsey launched a contest back in October 2014, encouraging fans to design the livery of Dempsey’s 911 GT3 Cup that he will be using for the race. The winner of the contest will get to see Dempsey drive a 911 GT3 Cup at the race sporting his/her design. Oh, and the winner’s also going to Brazil to enjoy the festivities live.

Well, the results are in and the winner of the “Design Dempsey’s 911 GT3 Cup” contest is a Porsche fan named Julia whose design involved a fingerprint livery covering almost the entire body of the 911 GT3 Cup.

It’s a simple design that does give a unique identity to Dempsey’s 911 GT3 Cup. I’ll venture a guess that it’s going to be the only 911 GT3 Cup competing in the race with a giant fingerprint as a livery.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup.

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2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Brumos Racing Edition

2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Brumos Racing Edition

The link between Brumos and Porsche dates back to the 1950s, when it was one of the first Porsche dealers to purchase cars from Porsche of America. In the 1960s, Brumos, under the direction of its new owner, took the company from a dealership to the top of the racing world with its high-performance Porsches.

Brumos went on to become one of the most successful racing teams in road racing history and in Porsche history. In 2011, Brumos had yet another great racing season, taking home the Rolex GRAND-AM GT Championship and adding to its legacy. In commemoration of this victory, Brumos is having five special edition 2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup racecars manufactured and they will offer them for sale in their dealership in Jacksonville, FL.

This just isn’t any old GT3 Cup car that a racing team can order from Porsche. This one is special in many ways, including a nice bump in power and some special styling specially ordered by Brumos. The big question is whether this is a true performer on the track or if this is nothing more than a pretty trailer queen to haul to car shows.

Click past the jump to read our full review on this special edition 911 GT3 Cup and find out the answer to that important question.

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1976 Porsche 934 Turbo RSR FIA GR/4

1976 Porsche 934 Turbo RSR FIA GR/4

When it comes to 1970s road racing events, there was Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, then everybody else. One of these fine examples is heading off to auction on Saturday May 12th in Monaco, via RM Auctions. This example up for sale is the 1976 Porsche 934 Turbo RSR FIA GR/4 chassis No. 930.670.0540.

The 1976 Porsche 934 Turbo RSR FIA GR/4 was one of the most important years in road racing series, as in the years following, each of the large road-racing series implemented rule changes that would eliminate these cars being road legal. This 1976 Porsche is one of the last examples of a road-legal racecar, which means you can title it and drive it on any city street.

This model is also important, as its chassis number shows that this was the final model of 31 built of this type. This not only makes it a rare beast, but also a collectable one, being the final production model. The
only more desirable chassis would be the first one built.

Despite the fact that this model Porsche was racing against non-road-legal models, it still pulled off some impressive races. By far its biggest success was its 4th overall finish in the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans. This makes it no surprise that this car also won many overall class championships between 1976 and 1977.

Want to own a true racing legend that was the last road-legal and top-level race-ready Porsche ever built? This is your model.

Click past the jump to read our complete review.

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2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid Version 2.0

2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid Version 2.0

Porsche has announced that they will be entering an improved version of the Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid into the upcoming Nürburgring 24 hour race on June 25, 2011. The hybrid system will combine the same 480 HP 4.0 Liter flat six engine delivering the same 480 hp with two electric motors that each produce 100 HP, as opposed to the original 75 HP each. The weight has also been lowered from 1,350 to 1,300 kilograms, or 2976 lbs to 2866 lbs.

"We’ve collected a great deal of information from our races on the Nürburgring, at the ALMS race at Road Atlanta in the USA, as well as from the ILMC race on China’s Zhuhai circuit, which was an invaluable help for the further development of our racing laboratory," says Hartmut Kristen, head of Porsche motorsport. "The emphasis of our work was on improving efficiency. That means we want to keep the lap times consis-tent with 2010 but use less energy, hence less fuel. In this way, we support future developments of road-going, sporting hybrid vehicles."

UPDATE 10/06/2011: The new GT3 R Hybrid made its debut at this year’s Laguna Seca, racing its way to a victory! Check out Porsche’s new video showing off the GT3R in action during the race by clicking on the image above. Enjoy!

Hit the jump to read more about the 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 R Hybrid Version 2.0.

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1998 Porsche 911 GT1

1998 Porsche 911 GT1

The Porsche 911 GT1 is the pride of Porsches Le-Mans efforts. The GT1 also represents the highest in technological achievements Porsche has gained though the development of its 911’s previous to the GT1.Created to homologate Porsche’s 911 GT1 contender, the street version, sometimes called ’Strassenversion’, is one of the most fierce and rare 911s you can run into.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1998 Porsche GT1.

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