view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

What you get if you work hard at improving the 550 Spyder

How often do you see an ex-works Porsche race car hit the auction block? It rarely happens and this is one of the few that were sold publicly in recent history. This is a 1960 Porsche 718 RS 60, member of the 718 RS family of open-top sports cars built and raced by Zuffenhausen for half a decade beginning with the RSK in 1957. The RS 60 appeared at a time when sports car manufacturers started realizing that mounting the engine behind the cockpit might be beneficial to the performance of the car after witnessing Jack Brabham muscling his way to the title in F1 in 1959. Porsche was already doing it and had been doing it for years, beginning with the 550 Spyder, a car infamous for having an important part to play in actor James Dean’s death but one that was, more importantly, a successful car in road racing.

The RS 60 Spyder raced everywhere around the world, following the trek of the World Endurance Championship and, along the way, ticking starts at Le Mans, the Nurburgring, and Targa Florio. Only 18 were built in period and the factory kept for its own use a mere four examples and this, according to RM Sotheby’s, was "the only to likely become available". Powered by a four-cam engine - first a 1.6-liter mill and, in 1961, a 2.0-liter one - the car you see in the pictures, chassis #044, doesn’t boast with the most enviable of racing records having retired out of both the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans race and all of the three major races it contested in 1961: the 12 Hours of Sebring, the 1,000-kilometer race at the Nurburgring-Nordschleife and the Targa Florio in Sicily. Having said that, it must be said that the car was fast, taking pole position outright in the Italian road race before being raced extensively by Bob Holbert, father of Porsche legend Al Holbert, an amazing driver in his own right - both behind the wheel of Porsches and, later, Cobras. It is, then, no wonder that chassis #044 sold for over $5.0 million back in mid-August during the Monterey sale. That’s one expensive aluminum Spyder!

Read more
1989 Porsche 911 Wide Track Phantom Speedster by DP Motorsport

1989 Porsche 911 Wide Track Phantom Speedster by DP Motorsport

This is OG Porsche tuning done right

The Porsche 911 is a lot like wine. The older it is, the more desirable it becomes. That appeal has stretched bounds that we previously thought didn’t exist. No more is that clear than in the aftermarket tuning world, for example. There once was a time when the mere thought of modifying an original Porsche 911 was tantamount to automotive treason. But now? It’s not only become a big business, but it’s also evolved into a what-you-can-do-I-can-do-better competition among aftermarket companies. Take this 1989 Porsche 911 Targa 3.2, for example. Traditional convention suggests that this classic 911 Targa should be kept in stock condition, preserved in its OG state for all eternity. German tuner DP Motorsports had other plans. It’s not the Porsche 911 Targa 3.2 anymore. It’s the Porsche Phantom Speedster, and guess what, it looks spectacular.

Read more
1965 Porsche 911

1965 Porsche 911

The classic 911 as you know and love and (probably) can’t afford to buy

The Porsche 911 is unarguably one of the most famous sports cars the world over. It’s also impossible to argue that the design of the 911 is legendary to the point that it doesn’t really move with the times, it stays the same while everyone else hurries to change every so often. By 1965, the 911 was already three years old, and the company finally dedicated itself to the 911 after halting the production of the venerable 356.

Unveiled at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show, the Porsche 901, later renamed 911 after Peugeot intervened, is Porsche’s most successful model and an icon all on its own. The design, penned by Ferdinand Porsche’s son ’Butzi’ Porsche with help from Porsche’s Head of Body Construction Erwin Komenda, was instrumental in shaping all of Porsche’s future products. In fact, Porsche never really strayed away from the design language introduced by the original 901 in the Fall of 1963. The latest 992-generation 911 still features a pair of round headlights in the front, a sloping tail with narrow taillights, and everything else in between. The only thing one can say about the modern 911 is that it’s much larger than its forefather, but you should blame that on both the quest for performance and the quest for safety.

Read more
1977 - 1995 Porsche 928

1977 - 1995 Porsche 928

That car that almost replaced the 911

The Porsche 928 was the company’s first production car with a V-8 engine and the only coupe powered by a front-mounted V-8 as of today. Developed in the 1970s as a replacement of the 911, the 928 was eventually sold alongside the rear-engine sports car. Production lasted from 1977 until 1995.

Porsche’s only luxury grand tourer up to date, the 928 was sold in various configurations. In addition to the base model, Porsche offered an S variant and later on changed the badge to the 928 S4. Club Sport (CS) and GT versions followed while the final four model years saw the 928 sold as a GTS only. While it wasn’t as popular as the 911, the 928 developed a following, and it’s now considered a classic.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 928.

Read more
1966 Porsche 906

1966 Porsche 906

Porsche’s last road-going sports prototype

Widely known as Porsche’s last road-going sports prototype, the Type 906, also known as the Carerra 6, celebrates its 50th birthday in 2016 and, given its importance in Porsche’s racing history, a look back is by all means necessary. While not innovative in its own right, the 906 put the brand on a road that led, to the launch of the astounding 917 which, like many success stories, had somewhat humble beginnings.

The beginnings lay in Porsche’s Type 904, which was the last to contest the 2.0-liter GT championship in 1964 and 1965. It was rendered obsolete in only its second year by Ferrari’s Dino 206S. Porsche was forced to step up to the challenge and answered with the 906, which, under different guises, ran in the 2.0-liter class for either sports cars or prototypes. It was also the first Porsche to accommodate a long-tail (lang-heck in German) configuration for the Le Mans race alone. A number of updates kept the 906 popular among privateers up until the dawn of the 1960s at which time it was still competitive in the 2.0-liter class as the championship’s focus had shifted toward the 5.0-liter sports cars and the 3.0-liter prototypes, respectively.

Following Porsche’s ethos of learning from the past and applying it to the future, the 906 carried over the suspension and brakes from the 904. Otherwise, it was a completely new car down to its tubular space frame. In racing terms, the 906 was a success, scoring big from its debut onward, a highlight being the victory in the 1966 edition of the famed Targa Florio, which was run in pitiful conditions with rain and fog all the way.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 906.

Read more
1958 Porsche 356 A 1500 GS/GT Carrera Speedster

1958 Porsche 356 A 1500 GS/GT Carrera Speedster

Rare, late production model built with racing in mind

In early 2016, Jerry Seinfeld decided to put three cars from his extensive car collection up for auction. One of those models was a 1958 Porsche 356 A 1500 GS/GT Carrera Speedster, and it is kind of a big deal. The car you’re looking at in the pictures is Chassis No. 84908 with Coachwork done by Reutter.

It was a late production model and was one of just 151 examples built. Making it even rarer, is that it is one of only 13 Speedsters – and the only Carrera Speedster – to be finished in Auratium Green. This example was recently restored to its original specifications and, in turn, has won itself a few Concours wins including the Best in Class honors at the Quail Motorsports Gathering and the Annual 356 Club Dana Point Concours d’Elegance.

This particular 356 A went under the hammer at the 2016 Amelia Island and changed hands for more than $1 million, making it one of the most expensive 356s in history. Keep reading to find out more about it.

Updated 03/14/2016: Jerry Seinfeld sold his Porsche 356 A 1500 GS/GT Carrera Speedster at the 2016 Amelia Island Auction for the amazing price of $1.54 million.

Note: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company

Continue reading to learn more about the 1958 Porsche 356 A 1500 GS/GT Carrera Speedster.

Read more
1955 - 1956 Porsche 550 Spyder

1955 - 1956 Porsche 550 Spyder

The Porsche 550 Spyder is about as classic and iconic as it gets, even for the storied Porsche brand. The lightweight roadster came from inspiration of the Porsche 356, but minus the hard roof. Porsche needed a race car to compete in the roadster class, and that’s just what the 550 Spyder did. In fact, the third 550 prototype and first 550 to race won its first event at the famed Nürburgring Eifel Race in 1953. Following that victory, the 550 went on to claim 95 victories and 75 class wins over a total of 370 races.

Winning wasn’t the only thing the 550 Spyder was known for. It was his newfound love of racing that spurred actor James Dean to purchase an example. Sadly, the actor and his still-new 550 were both fatally injured when a car pulled out in front of Dean as he drove down a California highway.

Nevertheless, the 550 Spyder enjoyed a storied career, with 90 examples being built. Of those 90 cars, 43 of them were built as non-race, “customer cars.” Both Dean’s and the blue example seen here are within that allotment. If fact, the chassis numbers are only separated by five digits, with Dean’s car wearing plate number 550-055 while the other wears plate number 550-060. The latter was owned by avid Porsche collector Jerry Seinfeld until March 2016.

Updated 03/14/2016: Jerry Seinfeld managed to get an amazing $5.35 million at a Gooding & Company auction for his 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder.

Note: Images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 550 Spyder.

Read more
1960 Porsche 356 B 1600 Cabriolet

1960 Porsche 356 B 1600 Cabriolet

The Porsche 356 was the first production car to wear a Porsche badge. Ferdinand Porsche, and his son (also named Ferdinand, but usually called “Ferry”) had been involved in the auto industry for a long time, but Ferry had a vision to make road cars with his family name on them. During WWII he had owned a Volkswagen that he had supercharged, and this gave him an idea, that a small car with a reasonable amount of power could be more fun than a big car with a lot of power. Thus the idea for the 356 was born, and the car would grow up along with the company that made it.

Since the 356 was Porsche’s first model (debuting in 1948), and it would stay in production for a fairly long period of time, every 356 tells a part of the story of the early years of Porsche. As the most popular variant of the car, the 356B gives us a particularly interesting cross section of company history. The 356 you see here is a 1960 model, notable for being the first of the 356s that would incorporate upgrades that would lead a few years later to the 911. Indeed, early 911 sketches were made alongside the plans for upgrading the 1960 356.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1960 Porsche 356 B 1600 Cabriolet.

Read more
1963 - 1964 Porsche 911 (901)

1963 - 1964 Porsche 911 (901)

There have been a lot of iconic sports cars over the years, but the Porsche 911 has reached a whole different level of iconic. It is the standard by which all other cars even remotely in its price range are judged, and it has been for decades. It is a staple on race tracks to the point where it’s not unusual to see half of the field made up of 911s at any given GT race. What’s most amazing about this is that the 911 comes from a different era, one where sports cars didn’t usually boast huge horsepower numbers, but it has managed to adapt and stay on top. Here we’ll take a look at the first generation of the car.

This generation is sometimes referred to as the 901, as it is in the title. This is not an official designation as with subsequent generations (Type 964, Type 993 etc.), but rather it is the original name for the car, and is applied as a way of avoiding confusion when referring to the only generation of the 911 without a specific generation number. The name was changed to 911 when Peugeot sued, saying it had exclusive rights to three-digit number model names with a 0 in the middle.
Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 (901).

Read more
1986 - 1989 Porsche 959

1986 - 1989 Porsche 959

In the 1980s the world was just coming off the gas-crunch of the `70s, and it had a taste for insanely fast machinery thanks to the Group B racing boom in rally and road cars. Porsche decided it wanted to use the racing regulations as a test bed for future models, so it took a 911 and used it as a rough base to create the 959, one of the greatest cars the world had ever seen. Originally codenamed the Gruppe B, the 959 would make use of an incredibly advanced electronic all-wheel drive system, some of the most advanced body materials available in the world, and a whole host of electronic aids that set the blueprint for today’s supercars. When the car finally hit showrooms in 1986, the Porsche 959 was the fastest street-legal car in the entire world.

While its bones are a 911 underneath, the 959 is a completely separate model of car that shares very little with its donor. The engine used a hybrid air- and water-cooled design, came with a pair of turbochargers, and it produced 444 horsepower. The 959 is the template for the modern supercar in almost every way. As a road car, it was the first to ship with tire pressure sensors, magnesium wheels (with hollow spokes no less), and an active differential. On top of all of its other accolades, it was also the first mass-produced car to come with a six-speed manual. Even today there are few cars on sale that can match the speed, pace and excitement provided by this incredible Porsche.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 959

Read more
2013 Porsche 911 Carrera S 50th Anniversary Edition - First Impressions

2013 Porsche 911 Carrera S 50th Anniversary Edition - First Impressions

The Porsche 911 is a special car; no doubt about that. The 911’s following faithful are a committed group of people who appreciate the 911 for its driving prowess, its handling abilities, and of course, its rich German heritage. The little two-door, rear engine sports coupe has come along way in 50 years, but it has never forgotten where it came from.

Porsche decided to throw itself a little 50th anniversary party with this beautiful example of a 2013 911 Carrera S. Quite a few things are different about the car that make it unmistakably special, but perhaps the most special aspect is its limited production number of just 1,963. Any Porsche fanatic could instantly spot the blatant reference to the year 1963, which is when the 911 was originally introduced.

Porsche decided to switch things up a bit with the 1,963 anniversary edition 911s to be built. They all feature the wide-body work from the all-wheel-drive Carrera 4, but are only rear-wheel drive. The exterior receives a heaping helping of chrome bits not normally found on the Carrera S, while the interior features throwback cues, like houndstooth cloth seats with leather bolsters and green-colored instrument cluster markings. Even the 20-inch wheels pay homage to the original “Fuchs” wheels of the ’60s.

Just like 50 years ago, the horizontally-opposed engine sits out back, however, this example makes a few more ponies – 430 to be exact. Hooked to Porsche’s PDK transmission, the 911 needs only 3.8 seconds to hit 60 mph on its way to a top speed of 185 mph. Upping the exclusivity, the anniversary edition makes even more power than the standard 911. Porsche made the Powerkit standard equipment, including the Sport Chrono Package and sport exhaust system.

Whether you’re a Porsche junkie or not, much appreciation and respect is due towards this 911. It celebrates 50 years of an industry leader - one that kept other companies up at night figuring out how to best such an unbeatable sports coupe.

Click past the jump for more pictures and info on the 50th anniversary 911

view all
Read more
1965 Porsche 911 Project 50

1965 Porsche 911 Project 50

The Goodwood Festival of Speed is a unique auto show that highlights more than today’s cars, but also pays homage to some past classics that paved the way for the current model’s to be as esteemed as they are.

For German automaker, Porsche, the 2013 Festival of Speed is an opportunity to showcase one such classic as part of its 50th anniversary: the 1965 Porsche 911 Project 50.

The model is actually a 1965 Porsche 911 that came powered by a 2.0-liter flat-six engine that produced 130 horsepower, a huge number back in the 60’s. The owner, who actually paid just £3,438 ($5,211) in today’s exchange, was an Italian who eventually sold it and soon thereafter, the car changed owners multiple times. It included a stop in the U.S. where it was soon imported to the UK sometime in the late 90’s where it morphed into a fully restored, FIA-Approved race car by what Porsche says was an "established historic Porsche motor sport preparation company."

In its current guise, the 911 Project 50 looks like it’s still got some legs to challenge in an auto race. At the 2013 Goodwood Festival of Speed, the car will make its public debut before embarking on a competition schedule that will include stops at a number of “Masters Series” events to go with appearances at larger festivals, such as the Nürburgring OldTimer and Silverstone Classic.

The car, itself, will be housed out of the company’s UK headquarters in Reading, Berkshire, and maintained by the in-house Porsche Cars GB Motorsport team. We’ll bring you more details as they become available.

Read more
1987 Porsche 928 H50 Concept

1987 Porsche 928 H50 Concept

Automakers usually take great pride in unveiling concept cars and while most of them don’t even see the light of production, they make for interesting talking points on what kind of car they could’ve been if they were produced en masse. Very rarely do you see a concept version get sent back under the covers without being seen by the public for the next 25 years.

But that’s exactly what happened last weekend at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance when Porsche brought out what can only be described as the evolutionary concept predecessor of the Panamera, the 928 H50 Concept.

It must be noted that the 928 H50 Concept bears a striking similarity to the 928s that were produced from 1978 to 1995. The overall profile is similar, including the long, sliding hood that harkens back to the aesthetic profile of the 928. There are some awkward lines in there and the front-rear balance appears to be skewed to the former, but for all of its resemblance to the old 928, the 928 H50 Concept has one thing the other doesn’t have: two extra doors.

Continued after the jump.

view all
view all
Read more
1979 Porsche 928 "Risky Business"

1979 Porsche 928 "Risky Business"

Way back in 1983, we all knew and loved a far less creepy and odd-acting Tom Cruise, who was best known for movies like "Top Gun" and "Risky Business," and less known for being love-drunk crazy on the Oprah Winfrey Show. In the 1983 Warner Brothers’ classic, “Risky Business,” Tom Cruise’s character, Joel Goodsen, drove a gold-colored Porsche 928. Now the Profiles in History auction group is offering up the car that Cruise drove on the set for auction.

Actually, there were three cars driven on set, but this 1979 928 saw far more screen time and seat time with Cruise than the other two drive cars. We know that the 1979 Porsche 928 is one of the least desirable Porsches ever built, falling just short in undesirability to the 924, but c’mon, Tom – freaking – Cruise learned how to drive a stick shift in this car.

So, how has this car held up after Cruise was finished burning up, err, learning to use the clutch? What is a car like this selling for? Is it really worth my money?

For the answers to these questions and more, you’ll have to click past the jump to read our review.

Read more