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2021 Porsche 911 Targa (Updated)

2021 Porsche 911 Targa (Updated)

The same familiar formula is still relevant

If you like the Targa top in your Corvette, you must know that Porsche did it first, in 1967. Now, the 992-generation of the ageless Porsche 911 continues the tradition and the latest Porsche 911 Targa will be introduced as a 2020 model year car and will feature the 444 horsepower 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged flat-six seen on both the Carrera S and the Carrera 4S. Expect it to cost at least $135,000, some $22,000 more expensive than a Carrera S. Blame it on that roll hoop that’s drenched in history.

Once upon a time, there was a road race through Sicily’s narrow, winding roads that awarded those that proved to be unphased by angry locals, that sometimes drew guns on the competitors, and the perilous condition of the tarmac in many areas of the Circuito delle Madonie. That race was the Targa Florio, launched in 1907 by rich entrepreneur Vincenzo Florio, that became a sort of a favorite for Porsche and its drivers, the brand from Stuttgart winning the race 11 times in less than two decades. How is this relevant to a 2020 Porsche? Read on to find out.

Update 11/27/2019: The Porsche 911 Targa was spotted doing some cold weather testing in Sweden. Check out the new images and a bit of new information below.

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2020 Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible

2020 Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible

Going topless in Stuttgart’s performance star

Porsche is currently gearing up for the release of the next generation 992-era 911, offered as a follow-up to the current 991-era 911. Per usual, Porsche will offer a variety of body styles and equipment levels, including high-end speed and unlimited headroom with the up-and-coming 911 Turbo Convertible.

Updated 10/21/2019: The 992-gen Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible was caught testing on public roads again and, while it doesn’t sport that cool red top we saw last time, there are some small changes that tell us this baby is ready to debut. Check out the new pictures and the details in our Spy Shots section below!

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1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

1960 Porsche 718 RS 60 Werks

What you get if you work hard at improving the 550 Spyder

How often do you see an ex-works Porsche race car hit the auction block? It rarely happens and this is one of the few that were sold publicly in recent history. This is a 1960 Porsche 718 RS 60, member of the 718 RS family of open-top sports cars built and raced by Zuffenhausen for half a decade beginning with the RSK in 1957. The RS 60 appeared at a time when sports car manufacturers started realizing that mounting the engine behind the cockpit might be beneficial to the performance of the car after witnessing Jack Brabham muscling his way to the title in F1 in 1959. Porsche was already doing it and had been doing it for years, beginning with the 550 Spyder, a car infamous for having an important part to play in actor James Dean’s death but one that was, more importantly, a successful car in road racing.

The RS 60 Spyder raced everywhere around the world, following the trek of the World Endurance Championship and, along the way, ticking starts at Le Mans, the Nurburgring, and Targa Florio. Only 18 were built in period and the factory kept for its own use a mere four examples and this, according to RM Sotheby’s, was "the only to likely become available". Powered by a four-cam engine - first a 1.6-liter mill and, in 1961, a 2.0-liter one - the car you see in the pictures, chassis #044, doesn’t boast with the most enviable of racing records having retired out of both the 1960 24 Hours of Le Mans race and all of the three major races it contested in 1961: the 12 Hours of Sebring, the 1,000-kilometer race at the Nurburgring-Nordschleife and the Targa Florio in Sicily. Having said that, it must be said that the car was fast, taking pole position outright in the Italian road race before being raced extensively by Bob Holbert, father of Porsche legend Al Holbert, an amazing driver in his own right - both behind the wheel of Porsches and, later, Cobras. It is, then, no wonder that chassis #044 sold for over $5.0 million back in mid-August during the Monterey sale. That’s one expensive aluminum Spyder!

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2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

The 2020 Boxster Spyder remains naturally aspirated, packs more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder is the range-topping version of the 982-generation Boxster. Based on a sports car introduced in 2016, the 2020 Boxster Spyder is the first to wear a "718" badge. Launched alongside the 718 Cayman GT4, its coupe counterpart, the Boxster Spyder features the largest and most powerful engine ever fitted into Porsche’s entry-level model.

The Boxster Spyder, inspired by the 718 race car from the 1950s, came to life in 2009 and returned for the 2016 model year. For 2019, the Spyder remains a limited-edition model that will probably earn collectible status in the near future. But does it have what it takes to compete with other similar sports cars, especially given its expensive price tag? Let’s find out in the review below.

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1989 Porsche 911 Wide Track Phantom Speedster by DP Motorsport

1989 Porsche 911 Wide Track Phantom Speedster by DP Motorsport

This is OG Porsche tuning done right

The Porsche 911 is a lot like wine. The older it is, the more desirable it becomes. That appeal has stretched bounds that we previously thought didn’t exist. No more is that clear than in the aftermarket tuning world, for example. There once was a time when the mere thought of modifying an original Porsche 911 was tantamount to automotive treason. But now? It’s not only become a big business, but it’s also evolved into a what-you-can-do-I-can-do-better competition among aftermarket companies. Take this 1989 Porsche 911 Targa 3.2, for example. Traditional convention suggests that this classic 911 Targa should be kept in stock condition, preserved in its OG state for all eternity. German tuner DP Motorsports had other plans. It’s not the Porsche 911 Targa 3.2 anymore. It’s the Porsche Phantom Speedster, and guess what, it looks spectacular.

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2020 Porsche 911 Speedster

2020 Porsche 911 Speedster

The Speedster returns after nine years!

The 2020 Porsche 911 Speedster is a limited-edition version of the 991-generation 911. Based on the 991.2 model discontinued in 2019, the 2020 911 Speedster is the last iteration of the eight-year-old sports car. It’s also the first Speedster since 2010, when Porsche sold a limited-edition model of 356 units based on the 997-generation 911.

Previewed by a couple of concept cars used to celebrate the company’s 70th anniversary of building sports cars, the 2020 911 Speedster is actually very similar to the show cars. But unlike its predecessors, it’s based on the track-ready 911 GT3 and generates in excess of 500 horsepower. As a result, it’s also the first Speedster developed by the Porsche Motorsport division. It also comes with a Heritage Design package that adds unique features inspired by vintage Porsche race cars, as well as a premium timepiece.

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2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet

High performance with infinite headroom!

The 2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet is the drop-top version of the eighth-generation 911. The 992-generation Porsche 911 arrived in 2018, replacing the old 991 model after seven years on the market. The Cabriolet version joined the lineup in January 2019, just ahead of the Detroit Auto Show. The drop-top shares everything from the design to its underpinnings with the coupe. Notable highlights for the new generation include vintage-inspired design cues, a wider body, new technology, and a revised turbocharged engine. Just like the coupe, the Cabriolet debuted in Carrera S trim, but a base model and AWD variants were added throughout 2019. The new drop-top also comes with a newly designed soft-top that is lighter and folds much quicker than its predecessor.

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2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T

2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T

Driving pleasure in its purest form

The 718 Boxster T is the first Porsche, alongside the 718 Cayman T, to sport the "T" badge, which stands for "Touring," after the 911 Carrera T. Unveiled in December 2018, it’s based on the base 718 Boxster but comes with a few extra standard features.

The "T" badge turns the already sporty 718 Boxster into a no-nonsense car that offers driving pleasure in its purest form. Although it’s powered by the company’s base engine for the Boxster and Cayman lineup, it’s equipped with chassis upgrades, the Sport Chrono package, and an infotainment system delete. It’s also a bit more affordable than the regular Boxster, with Porsche claiming you can save up to 10 percent compared to a similarly specced model. Let’s find out more about that in the review below.

Update 3/13/2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T from the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. Check them out in the gallery at the bottom of this page!

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Porsche Carrera GT "Recommissioned" by Porsche Classic

Porsche Carrera GT "Recommissioned" by Porsche Classic

This color combination looks suspiciously like Jean Grey’s costume from X-Men!

When a car is about to die its natural death, most car owners scrap it off and replace it with a new one. However, we enthusiasts try to do our best to bring it back to life instead of just disposing of something close to our hearts. Here is one such car lover who took his dying Porsche Carrera GT to Dr. Porsche Classic for a thorough restoration.

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2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept ll

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept ll

This is not a concept anymore, ladies and gentlemen

The Porsche 911 Speedster Concept isn’t a concept anymore. It has evolved into a special edition model after the folks from Stuttgart introduced the 911 Speedster Concept II at the 2018 Paris Motor Show. The 911 Speedster Concept II will be produced as a special edition model that’s limited to only 1,948 units. Porsche hasn’t announced pricing details for the limited edition roadster, but expect an announcement from the German automaker in the next few months. Keep yourselves updated because production of the 911 Speedster Concept II starts in the first half of 2019.

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2018 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS Exclusive Manufaktur Edition

2018 Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS Exclusive Manufaktur Edition

“Call me Targa - Porsche 911 Targa 4 GTS Exclusive Manufaktur Edition”

Porsche has added the 911 Targa 4 GTS Exclusive Manufaktur Edition to its lineup. It’s got a huge name to go with a ridiculous price tag. This special edition comes as a surprise because the 2020 Porsche 911 is all set to debut next month in Los Angeles.

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1958 Porsche 550a Spyder

1958 Porsche 550a Spyder

The little German giant killer

The Porsche 550 is a true icon of Porsche history. Known as both a race car and a sports car, the 550 was the kind of machine you could drive to the track, take the win, then drive back home. The famous British-American racing driver Ken Miles called it the “greatest long-distance racer in the world,” and despite its low power figures, this plucky little two-door could take down cars with far more power and straight-line speed. Eventually evolving into the even-quicker 550a, the 550 is now widely recognized as one of the more desirable collectible Porsches in the world.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 550a Spyder.

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1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986)

1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986)

A 911 droptop for the everyman

Although it might look like Porsche is at the top of its game these days, the Stuttgart brand has seen plenty of rough spots over the years. For example, back in the ‘90s, Porsche went through a period of stagnation and financial difficulty that very nearly killed the brand, but luckily, Porsche managed to put together just the right recipe to bring it back from the brink of bankruptcy. It’s called the Boxster..

Framed as a more accessible entry into the Porsche lifestyle, the Boxster 986 was the first model to carry the Boxster nameplate, with the first-gen lasting from 1996 to 2004. The name itself is an amalgamation of the words “roadster,” a nod to the car’s body style, and “boxer,” which is a nod to the car’s engine configuration. Equipped with classic Porsche styling, faultless handling characteristics, and a rev-happy powerplant, the Boxster was a smash hit for sales, and it is now credited with playing an integral part in Porsche’s late-‘90s renaissance.

Continue reading to learn more about the 1996 - 2004 Porsche Boxster (986).

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2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept

Is a production model underway?

Porsche just celebrated 70 years since its very first automobile, the 356 "No. 1," was created on June 8, 1948, and unveiled a speedster model based on the 911. But, while we were expecting a production model this year, the Germans showcased a production-ready concept car.

Developed at the Porsche Motorsport Center in Weissach, which is the birthplace of the 911 GT3, 911 GT3 RS, and the 911 GT2 RS, the Speedster Concept also celebrates the company’s long-standing tradition of making speedster-type roadsters, which don’t have folding roofs and are usually stripped of convenience features. The concept car likely previews a production model, further feeding rumors that a 911 Speedster will follow toward the end of 2018. But until that happens, let’s have a closer look at this concept car.

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2020 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Cabriolet

The iconic GT3 goes topless

An instant classic ever since it was introduced back in 1999, the Porsche 911 GT3 is living its final years as a naturally aspirated sports car, with rumors suggesting that it may go turbo for the next generation. With both the GT3 and GT3 RS models having received their updates for the 991 generation, Porsche may be preparing a new model before the 992-gen 911 arrives. The latest spy shots we received from our paparazzi suggest that Porsche might be working on a convertible version of the GT3 Touring.

Unveiled at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show, the 911 GT3 with the Touring Package is essentially a slightly more comfortable version of the track. It’s still fast and powerful, but more usable on public roads. More importantly, it doesn’t have the massive wing atop the engine lid. We like to call it the love child between the 911 GT3 and the strictly limited 911 R. Needless to say, a Cabriolet model would be a nice way to send the current GT3 into the history books, but is this mule a beefed-up drop-top or are we actually looking at the 911 Speedster? It’s difficult to say at this point, but a 911 GT3 Touring Convertible would be a really cool idea.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 Touring Cabriolet.

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2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

New turbocharged engine makes it quicker and more fuel efficient

First introduced in 1996 as the company’s entry-level sports car, the Porsche Boxster is now in its third generation, and it just received the GTS treatment with exclusive features and more power. Redesigned to include styling cues from the 911 and 918 Spyder, the third-gen Boxster also received a new, more rigid chassis, revised engine, and a small weight reduction compared to its predecessor. The engine lineup included three flat-six units at first, but this changed in 2016 when a comprehensive facelift replaced them with smaller, turbocharged flat-four powerplants. The update also brought a new name, with the "718" denomination added to the "Boxster" badge as a tribute to Porsche’s iconic race car from the late 1950s. With both the base model and the higher-performance S version already in showrooms, Porsche just expanded the Boxster family with the higher performance GTS version.

Spotted testing in the wild since 2016, the GTS is one of two higher performance versions of the Boxster. While not as aggressive and exclusive as the Spyder, the GTS is indeed a significant upgrade over the Boxster S. Lighter, more powerful, and fitted with extra gear; it gives owner access to more speed and quicker sprint times. When GTS prototypes were first spotted on the road, the first question that came to mind was whether or not the nameplate would also make a switch to turbocharged engines. As it turns out, the naturally aspirated Porsche is slowly dying, and the Boxster GTS also embraced forced induction. How does it compare to the previous model? Find out in the review below.

Updated 2-11-2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS taken at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show. Check them out in the gallery below!

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2017 Porsche 911 Turbo S Convertible By Wimmer

2017 Porsche 911 Turbo S Convertible By Wimmer

German tuner drops a can of horses on the drop-top 911 Turbo S

On the surface, Wimmer’s program for the Porsche 911 Turbo S Convertible oozes with flamboyancy, largely from the bombastic orange paint finish of the sports car and the litter of graphics and liveries attributed to the German tuner and its partners. It’s not a very pleasing sight if it were any other car. But it’s a 911 Turbo S Convertible, a car that in itself is filled to the brim with flash and attitude. It’s still largely an acquired taste, but it still grabs your attention, for better or worse. And so, like it or not, this is Wimmer’s new program for the 911 Turbo S Convertible. Good thing then that it also has a massive engine upgrade in there to the tune of 828 horsepower and 634 pound-feet of torque.

The power increase is massive and I think we can all agree that the 911 Turbo S Convertible is capable of squeezing as much out of it as it possibly can. The performance numbers validate it too because this tuned 911 is ridiculously fast, possibly even faster and more powerful than a limited edition supercar like the Ferrari F12tdf. The paint job and stickers might not be to everyone’s taste, but there’s no denying that Wimmer has a program here that will make owners of the drop-top 911 Turbo S stand up and take notice, at least until they hear about how much it’s going to cost.

Ultimately, this is the biggest sticking point for a lot of customers who are interested in getting aftermarket upgrades for their cars. Wimmer’s asking price is no different since it’s charging a whopping €310,000 ($327,300) to present would-be customers a Porsche 911 Turbo S Convertible that’s unlike any other.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Turbo S Convertible by Wimmer.

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