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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

The same flamboyant package with a Porsche motorsport design twist in and out

Porsche’s a big fan of letting the world know about its motorsport roots. After all, the brand’s success on the race track is something that deserves to be put out there, and the same applies to any sort of motorsport-related Porsche anniversary.

Meet the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition, a limited special-edition model that features a motorsport-inspired design and an interior that’s been luxed-up by Porsche’s very own Exclusive Manufaktur to mark the 15th anniversary of the customer and club sport series “Porsche Sports Cup Germany.”

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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4

The most radical Cayman to date breaks cover with more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 is the highest performance version of the 982-generation Cayman. An upgrade to the GT4 model from 2016, the 718 GT4 is the quickest and most potent Cayman ever built. And surprisingly enough, it still features a naturally aspirated flat-six engine, whereas all other Caymans have turbocharged power.

Originally rumored to arrive with an "RS" badge, the beefed-up Cayman carries over with the simpler GT4 nameplate. Unveiled alongside the 718 Boxster Spyder, the new 718 Cayman GT4 is significantly more potent than its predecessor, and it’s the first Cayman to develop more than 400 horsepower. Find out more about that in the review below.

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2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder

The 2020 Boxster Spyder remains naturally aspirated, packs more than 400 horsepower

The 2020 Porsche 718 Boxster Spyder is the range-topping version of the 982-generation Boxster. Based on a sports car introduced in 2016, the 2020 Boxster Spyder is the first to wear a "718" badge. Launched alongside the 718 Cayman GT4, its coupe counterpart, the Boxster Spyder features the largest and most powerful engine ever fitted into Porsche’s entry-level model.

The Boxster Spyder, inspired by the 718 race car from the 1950s, came to life in 2009 and returned for the 2016 model year. For 2019, the Spyder remains a limited-edition model that will probably earn collectible status in the near future. But does it have what it takes to compete with other similar sports cars, especially given its expensive price tag? Let’s find out in the review below.

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2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet

2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet

High performance with infinite headroom!

The 2020 Porsche 911 Cabriolet is the drop-top version of the eighth-generation 911. The 992-generation Porsche 911 arrived in 2018, replacing the old 991 model after seven years on the market. The Cabriolet version joined the lineup in January 2019, just ahead of the Detroit Auto Show. The drop-top shares everything from the design to its underpinnings with the coupe. Notable highlights for the new generation include vintage-inspired design cues, a wider body, new technology, and a revised turbocharged engine. Just like the coupe, the Cabriolet debuted in Carrera S trim, but a base model and AWD variants were added throughout 2019. The new drop-top also comes with a newly designed soft-top that is lighter and folds much quicker than its predecessor.

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2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

A Cayman with more go-fast goodies

Introduced in 2005 as a hardtop coupe iteration of the ever-popular Porsche Boxster roadster, the Cayman gets all the same good stuff as its topless sibling, plus the added rigidity and aggressive looks of a fixed roof. The latest fourth-generation was introduced in 2016, dubbed the 718 after the racer Porsche built in the late ‘50s. Now, Porsche is adding a new GTS iteration for the 2018 model year, and although we’ve seen a Cayman GTS in the past, this is the first time the formula has been applied to the fourth-gen 718. Per usual, the upgrades include a marginal power increase, more standard equipment, blacked-out trim pieces, and high-end interior materials.

Update 02/12/2019: We’ve updated this review with images taken at the Chicago Auto Show. This time around, the 718 Cayman GTS was dressed in a luxurious yellow that will just tickle your soul. Check out our fresh batch of images in the gallery at the bottom of this page!

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2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept ll

2018 Porsche 911 Speedster Concept ll

This is not a concept anymore, ladies and gentlemen

The Porsche 911 Speedster Concept isn’t a concept anymore. It has evolved into a special edition model after the folks from Stuttgart introduced the 911 Speedster Concept II at the 2018 Paris Motor Show. The 911 Speedster Concept II will be produced as a special edition model that’s limited to only 1,948 units. Porsche hasn’t announced pricing details for the limited edition roadster, but expect an announcement from the German automaker in the next few months. Keep yourselves updated because production of the 911 Speedster Concept II starts in the first half of 2019.

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2018 Porsche 935 Type 991 Gen. 2

2018 Porsche 935 Type 991 Gen. 2

The Celebratory car of celebratory cars

The year-long celebration of Porsche’s 70th birthday is just that! When we thought Porsche couldn’t possibly pop up with a new car to celebrate its birthday, after debuting the 919 ’Tribute’ and the 911 (993) ’Project Gold,’ the Germans decided to surprise everyone with a 935 for the modern age that was presented at Laguna Seca.

"This spectacular car is a birthday present from Porsche Motorsport to fans all over the world," said Dr. Frank-Steffen Walliser, Vice President Motorsport and GT Cars for Porsche AG, upon unveiling this sci-fi-meets-retro-cool creation. "Because the car isn’t homologated for any series, engineers and designers didn’t have to follow the usual rules and thus had freedom in the development." Naturally, no place else was better to show off this limited-edition car - only 77 will be made - than at Weathertech Raceway Laguna Seca during the Rennsport Reunion VI weekend.

Indeed, what we see here doesn’t resemble anything from Porsche’s current fleet of race cars, or road cars for that matter, but it was strongly inspired by a car from Porsche’s past. The inspiration is the 40-year-old Porsche 935/78 known as ’Moby Dick’ for its extra-long rear tail section, which raced only four times in 1978 but its legacy lives to this day.

The original 935, unlike this new model based on the Porsche 911 (991) GT2 RS, was built out of necessity. Porsche needed a car to compete in the new-for-1976 Group 5 rulebook that was introduced in the World Championship for Makes to attract manufacturer interest as the prototype car counts were at an all-time low.

The rulebook allowed for groundbreaking modifications to be done to the bodywork, as long as the roofline, windows, and doors were those of the production 911. With this freedom in mind, Porsche ditched the twin-headlight setup for a slant-nose front end with obvious aerodynamic gains. The widebody that resulted, coupled with the flat-six 2.9-liter engine from the 930, ensured that Porsche was the leader of the pack in 1976 and beyond.

Constant development work saw Porsche roll a new model in 1977, known as the 935/77 and a new one again for 1978, the 935/78, as well as working to benefit customers by updating its original 1976 design and offering it to private racing outfits under the 935/77A, 935/78A, and 935/79 designations.

The cars were so successful that they just about defined what Group 5 was all about: ludicrous silhouette bodywork, immense firepower from the engines - up to 700-horsepower for the later versions - and amazing speeds. Under various guises, the 935 won the 12 Hours of Sebring multiple times, the 24 Hours of Daytona multiple times, the 24 Hours of Le Mans once in the overall classification, and the World Championship for Makes for four years in a row.

A few of the aforementioned privateer outfits, due to their close affiliation with the factory, were allowed to modify the 935 further, according to their own plans. That’s how the Kremer-developed cars were born, as well as those constructed by Joest Racing, Fabcar or AIR. In fact, the Porsche 935 that won at Le Mans in 1979 wasn’t a works entry, Porsche dropping the Group 5 program after it retired the 935/78 from competition, but a privateer one from Kremer Racing with their own 935 K3 which was probably more celebrated in its day than the factory-developed cars.

All these victories, and Porsche’s improvements of its turbocharging technology which led to their domination of Group C in the ’80s, grant the 935 a spot in Porsche’s gallery of legends. It is, then, easy to see why the engineers in Zuffenhausen built this rolling tribute that is the 935 Type 991 Generation 2. This also means that the hype is big and, although it’s not homologated for any racing series, the new 935 has to live up to its predecessors on the race track. That’s why Porsche chose to unveil the car at the Rennsport Reunion VI.

Keep reading to find out more about the 935 Type 991 Gen. 2

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2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T

Base Carrera with GTS features, inspired by the original 911T

The Porsche 911 has gone through some big changes in the last couple of years, with the most important being Porsche’s decision to replace all naturally aspirated engines with turbocharged counterparts. While this was rather disappointing to some die-hard fans, it brought enhanced performance and fuel economy across the entire lineup. Porsche also revived the GT2 nameplate after a long absence and created the 911 R, essentially a limited-edition, wingless version of the GT3 for purists. Come 2017 and the German firm is offering yet another model aimed at purists and 911 Classic enthusiasts, but this time around is a significantly more affordable package. It’s called the 911 Carrera T and slots between the base Carrera and the GTS.

Inspired by the 911T, the company’s entry-level 911 between 1967 and 1973, the Carrera T is essentially a base Carrera with features taken off the more performance-oriented GTS. Fitted with a unique design elements inside and out, the Carrera T is also the first Carrera to get full bucket seats and rear-axle steering. The Carrera T is also lighter than the standard model, which makes it the lightest 911 available outside the GT3 and GT2 range. The added features and the lighter curb weight also makes it a tad quicker than the entry-level Carrera, placing it just below the Carrera S model in terms of performance. So while it’s not the least powerful and most affordable 911, as the 911T was back in the late 1960s, it’s a solid proposition for customers who want a no-nonsense Carrera but also desire access to the performance-enhancing features usually offered with the GTS model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 Carrera T.

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2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

2018 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS

New turbocharged engine makes it quicker and more fuel efficient

First introduced in 1996 as the company’s entry-level sports car, the Porsche Boxster is now in its third generation, and it just received the GTS treatment with exclusive features and more power. Redesigned to include styling cues from the 911 and 918 Spyder, the third-gen Boxster also received a new, more rigid chassis, revised engine, and a small weight reduction compared to its predecessor. The engine lineup included three flat-six units at first, but this changed in 2016 when a comprehensive facelift replaced them with smaller, turbocharged flat-four powerplants. The update also brought a new name, with the "718" denomination added to the "Boxster" badge as a tribute to Porsche’s iconic race car from the late 1950s. With both the base model and the higher-performance S version already in showrooms, Porsche just expanded the Boxster family with the higher performance GTS version.

Spotted testing in the wild since 2016, the GTS is one of two higher performance versions of the Boxster. While not as aggressive and exclusive as the Spyder, the GTS is indeed a significant upgrade over the Boxster S. Lighter, more powerful, and fitted with extra gear; it gives owner access to more speed and quicker sprint times. When GTS prototypes were first spotted on the road, the first question that came to mind was whether or not the nameplate would also make a switch to turbocharged engines. As it turns out, the naturally aspirated Porsche is slowly dying, and the Boxster GTS also embraced forced induction. How does it compare to the previous model? Find out in the review below.

Updated 2-11-2019: We’ve updated this review with fresh images of the 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster GTS taken at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show. Check them out in the gallery below!

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2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo

High-performance wagons aren’t extinct just yet!

If there’s one thing I don’t like about today’s hybrid car market, it’s the lack of station wagons. Seriously, you have plenty of options for every configuration, including supercars, but station wagons are pretty much restricted to a handful of models like the Toyota Auris wagon and the Volvo V90 T8. And you can’t even get the Toyota in the U.S. Fortunately, this just changed with the arrival of the arrival of the Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo. Sure, it’s not exactly affordable, but it’s a breath of fresh air if you’re in the market for a fast yet efficient vehicle with a little more room in the trunk than a standard sedan.

As you might have already guessed from the name, this Sport Turismo is essentially the wagon version of the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid that Porsche introduced at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. It has the same sporty design, but with a shooting brake roof, and the same powerful drivetrain that combines the company’s massive V-8 with an electric motor, and a battery. It’s the most powerful hybrid you can buy right now (that’s not a supercar, that is!) and it has no rival, especially in the station wagon niche. Let’s find out what makes it so attractive.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo.

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

Porsche gives birth to a purist-focused 911 that we can all get our hands on

Say what you will about Porsche’s tendency to get a little carried away with its niche variants for the 911, but credit should be heaped on the company for being aware of what customers want. Take the Porsche 911 GT3 for example. By every sports car metric, the 911 GT3 is a shining example of the best of Stuttgart engineering. The only problem with it is that it’s far from being the most understated 911 in the market, no thanks to its attention-grabbing aero bits. Then there’s the 911 R, the answer to prayers coming from Porsche purists who were crossing their fingers for a manual transmission 911. The 911 R was the answer to those prayers, except it was limited to just 991 units. Enter then the Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package. Think of it as the love child between the 911 GT3 and the 911 R, carrying elements from both models and wrapping them all up in one scintillating package.

The car’s name may not roll off the tongue as smoothly as I’d like, but remember, there is a precedence in Porsche’s history of the “Touring” name being used on a 911, specifically the 1973 Porsche Carrera 911 RS Touring. So we’ve established the roots of the 911 GT3 Touring. But far more than just being a product of Porsches-gone-by and previous iterations of the current-generation 911, the 911 GT3 Touring is a car of its own devices, understated in appearance yet ferocious in performance. In my view, this is the Porsche 911 variant that purists have been waiting for.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT3 with Touring Package

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2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

The quickest and most powerful 911 yet!

Porsche introduced the 911 GT2 in 1992, on the 993-generation sports car. It was initially built to meet homologation requirements for motorsport and it featured wider fenders and a larger rear wing compared to the standard model. Unlike the RS and the GT3, the GT2 used a turbocharged engine. Discontinued in 1998, the GT2 returned on the 996 generation between 2002 and 2005, and was resurrected once again on the 997-gen 911 in 2008. In 2010, two years before the GT2 was again retired, Porsche launched the 911 GT2 RS. Much like the GT3 RS, the GT2 RS weighed less and had a more powerful engine than the non RS version.

Development of the GT2 RS began in 2007, one year before the 997 GT2 was unveiled, as a skunk-works effort. It was dubbed "project 727," a number based on the Nissan GT-R’s 7:26.7-minute lap time around the Nurburgring Nordschleife. In 2010, the GT2 RS beat the GT-R’s time by an impressive nine seconds, stopping the clock at 7:18. Although Nissan improved the GT-R’s time in 2011 and 2013, it didn’t manage to overtake the GT2 RS until 2015, when the Nismo-prepped version lapped the German track in 7:08.

When it was launched at the 2010 Moscow Auto Show, the GT2 RS marked the absolute climax of the 911 range, becoming the fastest, lightest, and most powerful road-going Porsche to have ever been created. Production was limited to only 500 units, which gave the GT2 RS collectible status as soon as it hit the streets.

Continue reading to find out more about the Porsche 911 GT2 RS.

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2017 Porsche 911 Turbo

2017 Porsche 911 Turbo

The 991-generation 911 was launched in 2013 on an entirely new platform, only the third since the original 1963 Porsche 911 (901) was introduced. But, despite being less than three years old, the current 911 is set to receive a facelift in 2015. The update will include the entire lineup – although the 2016 GT3 RS will carry over unchanged for at least a couple of years – but it seems as if the non-Turbo models are the ones to benefit from the more important upgrades. At least under the hood.

As for the 2015 911 Turbo and Turbo S, both will get minor tweaks inside and out, and we now know that they get a bump up in power output as well. Expect the Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S to officially debut at the Detroit Auto Show on January 11th. With that debut right around the corner, Porsche has finally filled us in on what we’re going to see on the updated models. Keep reading to see what you can expect when they land in Detroit early next year.

Updated 01/20/2016: Porsche dropped a new video in which it highlights the 911 Turbo’s new PTV Plus - system that actively enhances vehicle dynamics and stability. Hit "play" to learn more about it.

Continue reading to find out more about the revised Porsche 911 Turbo.

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2004 - 2007 Porsche Carrera GT

2004 - 2007 Porsche Carrera GT

Although mid-mounted engines had become the norm with supercars by the 1980s, Porsche decided to stick with a rear-engined configuration when it developed the 959. The move obviously had to do with the fact that Stuttgart’s first supercar was based on the 911. It took Porsche until 1996 to build its first road-going mid-engined supercar, the 911 GT1 Strassenversion, but only because it needed it to homologate the race car with the same name. It was only eight years later, in 2004, that the German brand finally launched its first street-legal supercar with the powerplant mounted behind the seats: the Carrera GT.

Built until 2006, the Carrera GT was Porsche’s last supercar until the 918 Spyder was introduced in 2013. Much like its successor, the Carrera GT was one of the very few available products that rivaled Ferrari’s top supercar at the time, the Enzo. Although it wasn’t meant to become the most powerful or fastest road-legal supercar, the Carrera GT lived on as one of Porsche’s finest efforts in the business and one of the best supercars of the 2000s.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Carrera GT.

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2016 Porsche Cayman GT4

2016 Porsche Cayman GT4

A more affordable, mid-engined proposition to the 911 GT3

The second-generation Porsche Cayman was unveiled at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show and released as a 2014 model in the spring of 2013. Although redesigned from the ground up, the new mid-engined coupe remained recognizable as a Cayman and as a Porsche sports car in general. The interior also received new features and updated tech, while both the 2.7-liter and 3.4-liter flat-six engines were revised. A facelift unveiled in 2016 brought new turbocharged, flat-four powerplants and a name change that revived the classic 718 name.

Equally important is that the second-generation Cayman spawned the GT4, the first track prepped version of the mid-engined coupe and a proper equivalent to the already iconic 911 GT3.

Attention performance purists: your savior from Stuttgart has arrived. Porsche just unveiled the latest member of its GT family, officially inducting the Cayman into that illustrious batch of performance vehicles distilled to offer the most essential of driving characteristics. Unsurprisingly, this feat is accomplished with components pulled from the track-bruising 911 GT3, following the mid-engine sports-car formula perfected by cars like the 904 GTS, 911 GT1, Carrera GT, and 2014 918 Spyder.

Those are tough acts to follow, but the Cayman GT4 is no slouch. Porsche is claiming a lap around the North Loop of the Nürburgring in seven minutes and 40 seconds, placing it alongside the 2011 911 GT3 around the iconic German racetrack.

However, despite such a blistering pace, Porsche says it developed the engine, chassis, brakes, and aero to perform without hindering the overall utility expected of a two-seater sports coupe. That means this weapon of velocity should be somewhat drivable on surfaces without rumble strips and apex markers.

The rumor mill predicted everything from a turbocharged four-cylinder to a hybrid drivetrain for the Cayman GT4, but such complications remain mere hearsay. Read on to learn more about this latest mid-engine monster.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche Cayman GT4.

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