Back to Porsche

Porsche Drifting Cars

Models

view grid view horizontal compact blog view
Video: RAUH-Welt Begriff Porsche 911 Makes Some Tasty Donuts

Video: RAUH-Welt Begriff Porsche 911 Makes Some Tasty Donuts

Good morning, TopSpeeders; we’re serving up a hot helping of vulcanized donuts for your visual consumption. Today’s chef is Brian Scotto and his 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo do the cooking. This isn’t just a regular 911 Turbo, this Porsche has been worked over by the Japanese company Rauh-Welt Begriff. Scotto and RWB have done some serious modifications to the Porsche, not exclusive to that outlandish body kit. The car’s suspension sits an inch and a half lower, and it rides on 265/40 series tires up front and crazy-big 315/30 series tires out back. The rubber wraps wheels from Fifteen52 sized in 18-by-11 inches and 18-by-12 inches respectively.

Since the car was built just days before the 2011 SEMA show, Scotto and RWB initially left the engine and drivetrain alone. That meant the turbocharged, 3.3-liter, flat-six engine originally cranked out 315 horsepower at 5,750 rpm and 332 pound-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm. Those were pretty healthy stats for a car built over 20 years ago. However in recent times, the guys at BBI Autosport slapped on a new exhaust and engine management tuning to squeeze an estimated 440 horses from the rear-mounted engine.

The story behind this Porsche’s trip to SEMA circles around Scotto’s and co-operator and WRC driver Ken Block’s launching of the Hoonigan brand. The Porsche served as the point car and help differentiate Block as an independent driver not attached to Ford.

All that’s well and good, but donuts are more fun. So enjoy this heaping helping of tire-burning, smoke-billowing, hooning fun. And make sure not to miss the vintage Mr. Donuts reference in the video.

Read more
Video: Nissan Juke-R Vs. Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Video: Nissan Juke-R Vs. Porsche 911 GT2 RS

It was confirmed that the Juke-R will hit production, based on the 2012 GT-R specs, so this means it is time to pit it against some of the best sports cars on the planet. Car and Driver did just that with a great piece pitting the Juke-R against the best Porsche has to offer, the 911 GT2 RS. We need to keep in mind here that the test-model Juke-R is based on the initial run GT-R’s drivetrain, including its 495-horsepower, 3.8-liter (the video says 3.7-liter for some reason) V-6 twin-boost engine. The production Juke-R will come with the 2012 GT-R specs, including a boost to 530 horsepower, but will also cost about $590,000. No, that’s not a typo.

In the other corner sits the $245,000 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, which boasts a 620-horsepower 3.6-liter flat-6 and a significant weight advantage. In the video, this crazy driver decides to take the cars to Bedford Autodrome and put their lap times to the test. Following that test, the team hits up an airfield and puts the two to a 1-mile test.

Putting a 620-horsepower GT2 RS against a heavier Juke-R with a 125-horsepower deficiency typically means a win on all fronts for the GT2 RS. However, this test involves a slightly wet track and the Juke-R features the GT-R’s impressive AWD system, so the Juke-R just may come out on top.

To find out, you’re going to have to check out the video. Not only is the video chock-full of racing action, but it also features some kick-ass slow-motion scenes that will blow your mind and tons of sweet, sweet noise.

Enjoy!

view all
view all
Read more
Falken at the 2009 SEMA Show

Falken at the 2009 SEMA Show

Speaking of tire smoking drift cars and Porsches, another familiar face at the 2009 SEMA Show was Falken with a pair of very different blue and green high performance machines to show off what Team Falken is all about. It is nice to see that one manufacturer can be so successful in two completely different disciplines of motor sport.

Representing the world of drifting where goal is to get sideways, light up the tires and hope for an outstanding crowd reaction in a matter of corners was Formula D driver and recent Japanese export Vaughn Gittin Jr.’s competition drift car, a 2010 Ford Mustang with enough supercharged Detroit iron under the hood to go through a set of Falkens in a matter of minutes. On the other hand, the Falken Porsche that races in the American Le Mans Series is about getting as much grip as possible from the sticky Falken slicks, keeping wheel spin to a minimum and hoping not to get the crowd on its feet until the end of the lengthy endurance race. If they got excited any sooner, it would probably signal the end of the car’s day. However as different as the setup on each of these cars is, they are both able to excel at their particular brand of motor sport.

Read more