Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
1965 Porsche 911

1965 Porsche 911

The classic 911 as you know and love and (probably) can’t afford to buy

The Porsche 911 is unarguably one of the most famous sports cars the world over. It’s also impossible to argue that the design of the 911 is legendary to the point that it doesn’t really move with the times, it stays the same while everyone else hurries to change every so often. By 1965, the 911 was already three years old, and the company finally dedicated itself to the 911 after halting the production of the venerable 356.

Unveiled at the 1963 Frankfurt Auto Show, the Porsche 901, later renamed 911 after Peugeot intervened, is Porsche’s most successful model and an icon all on its own. The design, penned by Ferdinand Porsche’s son ’Butzi’ Porsche with help from Porsche’s Head of Body Construction Erwin Komenda, was instrumental in shaping all of Porsche’s future products. In fact, Porsche never really strayed away from the design language introduced by the original 901 in the Fall of 1963. The latest 992-generation 911 still features a pair of round headlights in the front, a sloping tail with narrow taillights, and everything else in between. The only thing one can say about the modern 911 is that it’s much larger than its forefather, but you should blame that on both the quest for performance and the quest for safety.

Read more
2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S GTstreet RS by TechArt

2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S GTstreet RS by TechArt

TechArt is at it again, making great Porsches even better

TechArt is one of Germany’s top Porsche tuners, and it plans to reconfirm this status by unveiling at the 89th Geneva Auto Show the latest and most insane version of its well-known GTstreet R model, this time based on the Porsche 911 (991) Turbo S and dubbed the RS. In short, it’s an angry green hornet with 760 horsepower on tap, a 0 to 62 mph time of 2.5 seconds, and a top speed limited to 211 mph because that’s as much as the tires can take.

Porsche is one of the of the most popular sports car manufacturers the world over. As such, there are tons of companies that cater to people who want to make their Porsche just a little bit faster and a little bit more special. Then there are firms, like Ruf or TechArt, that are recognized as independent manufacturers and whose creations stretch far beyond the might of the models used as the foundation for their projects.

TechArt’s GTstreet R kit for the Porsche 991-generation of the Porsche 911 has been around for a few years. We reviewed it a couple of years ago when it was fresh out of TechArt’s laboratory and came to the conclusion that "it has some strong competition from Gemballa, but it still possesses an enviable combination made up of an outstanding aero kit, a dressed-up interior, and powerful engine upgrades." Prepare, then, for something even better and much rarer as only ten will be made!

Update 3/12/2019:We’ve updated this review with images of the 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo GTstreet RS by Techart taken during the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. Check them out in the gallery at the bottom of this page!

Read more
2018 Porsche Mission E Cross Turismo Concept

2018 Porsche Mission E Cross Turismo Concept

Germany’s answer to the Tesla Model X!

Back in 2015, Porsche unveiled the Mission E concept, an all-electric super sedan that featured drivetrain technology developed for the 919 Hybrid race car. It didn’t take long for Porsche to confirm a production model and the test cars spotted on public roads began to fuel everyone’s dreams of a premium competitor for the Tesla Model S. While the Mission E is still under development, Porsche wants to expand its all-electric lineup with a different model. It’s based on the Mission E design- and drivetrain-wise, but it’s aimed at the booming crossover market. It’s called the Mission E Cross Turismo and previews a production model that will surely become the Porsche Cayenne of the electric market.

Unveiled at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the Mission E Cross Turismo is a sporty crossover that combines elements seen on the Mission E sedan, the Cayenne, and the Panamera Sport Turismo. Yes, it’s a shooting brake that rides as high as a crossover, and it previews a competitor for the Tesla Model X. Porsche has already confirmed that a production model is underway, with the release date set sometime in 2019. It’s still one year away, but at least it’ll be here sooner than the Mission E, which took at least three years to become reality. And, by the looks of things, the Cross Turismo concept looks ready to go into production for the most part.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Mission E Cross Turismo Concept.

Read more
We Expected the Porsche Mission E in Geneva and Got a Hatchback – the E Cross Turismo Concept – Instead

We Expected the Porsche Mission E in Geneva and Got a Hatchback – the E Cross Turismo Concept – Instead

No kidding folks, this thing is a Porsche

Porsche showed up to the Geneva Motor Show with the E Cross Turismo Concept, effectively putting to bed rumors that the Mission E Sedan would make its appearance at this year’s show. With a production-ready design and an 800-volt electrical system in tow, this concept does, however, confirm previous reports that the Mission E platform could expand to a whole lineup of all-electric models. Porsche promises that the E Cross Turismo can deliver more than 600 horsepower consistently, hit 62 mph in less than 3.5 seconds, and hit 124 mph in under 12 seconds.

Read more
2018 Porsche Panamera by Techart

2018 Porsche Panamera by Techart

German tuner is elevating the Panamera to new heights

TechArt’s work on the Porsche Panamera extends all the way from the saloon’s introduction in 2009. We’ve seen the German tuner introduce different versions of its GrandGT tuning kit in the past eight years. At the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, TechArt is keeping the tradition alive with its latest and punchiest Panamera program to date. The kit is called the GrandGT Supreme, and as its name suggests, the program is a more sophisticated version of the standard GrandGT, one that features a more aggressive body kit, a more opulent interior, and enough power to justify its cutting-edge looks.

Read more
2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Germany’s latest track-toy is here, and it’s pretty fast!

Launched in 2015, the 991-generation GT3 RS was a significant update over the GT3 and a big departure from the previous car design-wise, having borrowed base bodywork from the Turbo model. On the other hand, the 4.0-liter inline-six was pretty much identical to the 997-generation GT3 RS 4.0 model, as was the 500-horsepower output, a bit of letdown for those expecting a more powerful car. This minor inconvenience was fixed with the upgraded GT3 RS, which gained a more potent engine now that the standard GT3 has been updated to the same 4.0-liter mill. Set to make its public debut at the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, the 991.2 GT3 RS might just be the last naturally aspirated GT3 model.

Unleashed on public roads in early 2017 as a prototype, the new GT3 RS isn’t exactly new. Heavily based on the GT3, it shares many features with its non-RS sibling and it takes a closer look to spot the differences inside and out. But it’s the engine that sets the RS apart thanks to an extra 20 horsepower, as well as the fact that you can’t get it with a manual transmission. The chassis setup is also different, so the RS is bound to be quicker on the race track. Just don’t expect it to be very different on the outside. Let’s find out more about that below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

Read more

Latest Videos:

2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Unveiled

2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Unveiled

The latest and greatest Stuttgart superstar born for the track

Porsche just revealed the new 2019 911 GT3 RS ahead of its official debut at the 2018 Geneva International Motor Show. As the third road-legal GT model Porsche has unveiled in a year, this thing oozes racing prowess from every pore, taking the tried-and-true GT3formula to the next level.

The beating heart of the machine is made up 4.0-liters of all-atmosphere displacement in the rear. Liberal application of gasoline yields as much as 520 horsepower and 346 pound-feet of torque, 20 ponies more than the current GT3, making this flat-six the most powerful naturally aspirated powerplant ever used in a road-legal 911. Redline is set at a howling 9,000 rpm, which you can bet sounds amazing coming through the titanium exhaust system.

Making the connection to the rear axle is a tuned-up seven-speed PDK gearbox. All told, the GT3 RS will do the 0-to-60 mph run in 3 seconds flat, two-tenths quicker than the current PDK-equipped 911 GT3 and a tenth quicker than the outgoing GT3 RS. Top speed is rated at 193 mph.

Making the most of the power is a Porsche Active Suspension Management system, which includes active engine mounts, a fully variable electronic locking differential, and freshly tweaked rear-axle steering. Drivers can tune the handling via the ride height, toe, camber, caster, and sway bars. Short stops come courtesy of standard iron rotors, or the optional lightweight Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes rocking 410 mm (16.1-inch) front discs and 390 mm (15.4-inch) rear discs.

You’ll also find the traditional fixed rear wing, tweaked polyurethane front and rear fascias, a larger front lip spoiler and side skirts, and a rear underbody diffusor, plus NACA ducts in front to help cool the brakes. All told, the new GT3 RS produces twice as much downforce as the standard 911 GT3 when traveling at 124 mph.

The new model is also quite light. The front trunk lid, fenders, and rear deck lid are all made from carbon fiber, while the roof is made from magnesium. There’s also lightened glass for the rear and side windows, lightened door panels, less sound insulation, and a rear seat delete. The optional Wiessach package replaces several parts with additional carbon fiber, cutting 13 pounds, while the optional magnesium wheels cut even more weight. Standard spec includes forged alloy wheels measuring in at 20 inches in front and 21 inches in the rear. In its lightest configuration, the 2019 GT3 RS tips the scales at 3,153 pounds.

Inside is the usual track-ready equipment, such as carbon fiber-laced bucket seats and a 360 mm (14.2-inch) steering wheel wrapped in Alcantara and complete with a yellow 12 o’clock marker.

Look for the 2019 Porsche GT3 RS at the Geneva International Motor Show in March. Order books are open now, with pricing set at $187,500.

Read more
2017 Porsche 911 Avalanche By Gemballa

2017 Porsche 911 Avalanche By Gemballa

There’s a steep price to pay to get the 911 fitted with the newest Avalanche program

It’s been a while since we last heard from Gemballa, but like most tuners who’ve been around for as long as Gemballa has, these prolonged times out of the spotlight often lead to something worth waiting for. And so, the German tuner took its time to release its new program, but now here it is, the latest iteration of the Avalanche program that Gemballa has been building since 1985 for the Porsche 911. Gemballa’s extended experience with the 911 has yielded impressive results in the past, so it’s not at all surprising to see the latest member of that lineage come with plenty of aftermarket features, including power gains for the current-generation 911 amounting to an impressive 820 horsepower and 700 pound-feet of torque. And that’s just the start of it because, well, it’s Gemballa.

True, the company has had some issues in the past, but none of those controversies has stopped it from being one of the best Porsche tuners in the business. That’s been the case then, and it continues to be the case with this new Avalanche program. You only need to take a look at the finished product to see how sophisticated this new program is. It has a rear wing and a rear spoiler, the exhausts look like jet turbines, and there’s even a GT-style fin at the back. How often do you see a Porsche 911 carrying a fin that big?

There’s obviously more this new Avalanche program than meets the eye. Most of the components on the exterior are more than just cosmetic upgrades. Even the interior has been dramatically altered, albeit for reasons that I’m going to expound on later. And let’s not forget about those massive 21-inch gold wheels. They’re a little tricky to pair on a car given their ostentatious look, but Gemballa makes it work, largely because of the aggressive aerodynamic bits that help jolt some intensity into the iconic Porsche nameplate.

In keeping with the tradition of its past programs, Gemballa’s new Avalanche kit for the Porsche 911 isn’t for the weak of bank accounts. But if anybody decides to make this rather extravagant splurge, it’s coming with a reworked Porsche 911 that borders on automotive insanity.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Avalanche by Gemballa

Read more
2018 Porsche 911 GT3

2018 Porsche 911 GT3

The manual transmission returns!

Sold out since early 2015, the current-generation Porsche 911 GT3 has finally returned into dealerships with updates similar to the 991.2 911. Unveiled at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, the track-prepped 911 is making a comeback after nearly two years with revised styling, a retuned chassis, and more importantly a new drivetrain.

Not surprisingly, the race-bred coupe didn’t change much inside and out, and most of the new stuff is borrowed from the regular 911 that was upgraded in 2016. However, the revised chassis brings new dynamics, while the troublesome 3.8-liter flat-six was replaced by the slightly bigger, 4.0-liter unit from the GT3 Cup race car and the range-topping GT3 RS. The really big news about the new 911 GT3 is that Porsche finally brought the manual transmission back, giving enthusiasts a new reason to celebrate..

Developed on the same test track and manufactured on the same production line as the 911 race cars, the GT3 returns to a market that has a brand-new competitor, the Mercedes-AMG GT R. Launched in 2016, the AMG GT R is the first track-prepped car to actually compete in the same niche, something that hasn’t happened in quite a few years. Will the 911 GT3 continue to dominate this demanding segment? Let’s find out in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Porsche 911 GT3.

Read more
Porsche 911 GT3 Returns After Three Years with Bigger Engine

Porsche 911 GT3 Returns After Three Years with Bigger Engine

Manual transmission is an option!

It’s been some three years since the 991-generation 911 GT3 made its debut and a good couple of years since it became sold out. A new GT3 is long overdue, but the wait will be over in 2017 because Porsche just unveiled an updated model at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. Not surprisingly, it has been upgraded to 991.2-generation looks inside and out and fitted with new technology and a new engine.

A quick look is enough to notice what changed styling-wise. Up front, we have a remodeled bumper with a wider center intake and larger side vents. The LED daytime running lights above are slimmer, while the black winglets improve aerodynamics. Further changes are visible around back, in the shape of a new diffuser with black elements, a restyled license plate recess, new-style taillights, and a reshaped, larger wing.

There aren’t many changes to talk about inside, but customers will be greeted by a new steering wheel sourced from the 918 Spyder, enhanced side bolstering for the seats, electronically adjusting backrests and three optional seat variants. There’s the adaptive Sports Plus with 18-way power adjustment, bucket seats with folding backrest and integrated thorax airbag, and race-inspired, full bucket seats from from carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic. On the tech side, it gets the Connect Plus module and the Track Precision app as standard. The latter enables GT3 drivers to display, record, and analyze driving data on their smartphone or tablet.

There’s bigger news under the hood, where the 3.8-liter flat-six, the engine that caused a deal of trouble by catching fire in some cars in 2014, was replaced by the larger, 4.0-liter boxer. But while some expected Porsche to borrow the unit from the GT3 RS, the GT3 actually got the same engine as the GT3 Cup race car. The Germans claim that the 500-horsepower mill is virtually unchanged and mates to a revised seven-speed PDK as standard. Tipping the scales at 1,430 kg with a full fuel tank, the GT3 sprints to 62 mph in 3.4 seconds on its way to a top speed of 199 mph, four mph more than the previous model. A six-speed manual gearbox is available optionally, but reduces the 0-to-62 mph sprint to 3.9 ticks.

Other enhancements include rear-axle steering, a retuned chassis for better driving dynamics, a lowered ride height, and dynamic engine mounts. Pricing is set from €152,416 in Europe and from $143,600, excluding the $1,050 delivery, in the United States.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo

2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo

The Panamera Sport Turismo is set to hit the U.S. Market by the end of 2017

It’s been four years since we first saw the Panamera Sport Turismo Concept at the Paris Motor Show. Since then, the next-gen Panamera sedan has made its appearance, and more recently we got to lay eyes on the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid. We’ve received a few rounds of spy shots that showed the Panamera Shooting Brake being put through the paces, and just before it’s official debut at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show, Porsche has decided to spill the beans about the newest member of the Panamera Family. Sporting the same front end as its sedan sibling and a whole new design out back that’s similar to that of the Sport Turismo Concept, the Panamera Shooting brake will also be available with the same four engines offered in the sedan, and somehow manages to maintain the same performance figures despite being slightly longer.

It gets an active spoiler out back that helps add downforce to the rear axle at track speeds, and can be had with a 2+2 or a 4+1 seating layout, the latter of which throws a jump seat of sorts between the individual seats in the rear. That makes this shooting brake model the first to offer seating for five when properly equipped. So far, Porsche as released a fair amount of information regarding its newest wagon (am I the only one who’s not sure the standard Panamera is even really a sedan?) and it’s enough to cover most of the juicy bits. We’ll surely learn more at its official debut and later on when it officially launches here in the U.S., but until then, let’s dive on in a take a good look at the new Panamera Shooting Brake… uhem…. Panamera Sport Turismo.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo.

Read more
Porsche Finally Gives Us A Panamera Wagon With The New Sport Turismo

Porsche Finally Gives Us A Panamera Wagon With The New Sport Turismo

New body style brings more practicality, plus all the speed you’d expect

Hot on the heels of the release of the outrageously powerful Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid, Porsche is giving us another new Panamera to pick over. This one’s called the Sport Turismo, and it adds to the lineup with a fresh wagon body style (believe it or not, the old Panamera is called a “sedan”). The Sport Turismo will be offered in four trim levels, including the 4, 4S, 4 E-Hybrid, and the Turbo, with the top-spec model laying down 550 horsepower. Not only that, but up to five passengers and an impressive amount of stuff can go along for the ride.

Inside, you’ll find lots of luxury, with leather upholstery and wood trim throughout. There’s also lots of technology, including features like the Porsche Advanced Cockpit, Porsche InnoDrive, Porsche Communication Management, and adaptive cruise control.

Meanwhile, to help it turn, the wagon gets stuff like Rear Axle Steering, Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control Sport, and electronic roll stabilization. Adaptive air suspension is standard, while wheel sizing is up to 21 inches in diameter.

Out on top of that newly restyled rear end is an extendable, adaptive spoiler, offering three settings for variable levels of rear downforce, making up to 110 pounds to push on the rear axle.

Straight-line performance is similar to the sedan, with the top-spec Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo laying down a 3.4-second 0-to-60 mph time thanks to its 550-horsepower twin-turbo 4.0-liter V-8.

And since wagons are known for offering a decent amount of cargo space, I should also point out that the Sport Turismo gets up to 18.4 cubic feet of rear storage with the rear seats up, and 49 cubic feet with the seats folded down.

The 2018 Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo will make its worldwide debut at the Geneva International Motor Show next week, with U.S. deliveries expected by the end of the year. Pricing starts at $96,200 for the base-model 4, and tops out at $154,000 for the Turbo.

Personally, I think it definitely looks like an improvement compared to the old model. What do you guys think? Does the wagon style work for you as well? Let us know in the comments.

Read more

Latest Wallpapers:

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid

Think of it as a more comfortable, more attainable four-door 918 Spyder…

Porsche first unveiled the Panamera in 2009, dropping the cover on its four-door’d 911 lookalike at the 13th Auto Shanghai International Automobile Show in China. Drawing its name from the Carrera Panamericana open-road rally from the ‘50s, the Panamera was a clear break from the brand’s sports coupe history. However, like the Cayenne SUV that came before it, the Panamera quickly established itself as one of Porsche’s staple model lines, selling well across several markets, especially in the U.S. To help broaden the sedan’s appeal even further, Porsche introduced the Panamera plug-in hybrid in 2013, followed by a second-gen release in 2016. Now, Stuttgart has introduced another electrified variant called the Turbo S E-Hybrid, and rather than just providing green sensibilities, the hybrid bits make it faster. In fact, with a twin-turbo V-8 and electric motor under the hood, the Turbo S E-Hybrid is the most powerful model to wear a Porsche badge at the moment, save for the 918 Spyder. Pair all that go with four-door comfort, oodles of cabin luxury, and even a long-wheelbase variant, and this thing looks to create a whole new niche all for itself.

And why not? We’re long past the era when hybrid tech was reserved solely for Prius wannabes, and electrified powertrains are now commonplace in both sports cars and in racing. For example, Audi, another VW product, was the first to take top honors at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in a hybrid with its R18 E-Tron diesel in 2012. Now Porsche has adopted similar technology for the Panamera, even pulling influences from the uber-fast 918 for inspiration.

Porsche says “the Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid is another compelling demonstration of the performance advantages of hybrid technology, “ and that it seeks to combine “performance, comfort and efficiency [in] a perfect three-way combination.”

Basically, Porsche is making its surprisingly fast Panamera even faster by adding a fat dose of electrification. And we like that, even if it still looks… well, like a Panamera.

The new Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid will premiere in the metal at the Geneva International Motor Show early this March, and will also be offered in a long-wheelbase Executive edition. The specs between the Euro-bound model and U.S.-bound model are identical, which leads us to ask – is this thing basically a four-door 918 Spyder?

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid.

Read more
2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Unveiled

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Unveiled

Adds a big battery for more of the fast

Porsche just unveiled the new head honcho of the Panamera stable, and it just so happens to be a hybrid, marking the very first time an electrified model has lead a Porsche line.

It’s called the Turbo S E-Hybrid, and it uses hybrid technology for moar power. As such, the new Panamera Hybrid replaces the old Panamera hybrid’s six-cylinder with the same boosted V-8 as the Panamera Turbo, yielding 4.0-liters of displacement, plus an electric motor. That means 550 horsepower from the dino juice, plus an extra 136 horsepower from the electric motor. And that means when you put your foot down you’ll enjoy a whopping 680 horsepower and 626 pound-feet of torque, figures only bested by the mighty 918 Spyder when it comes to production vehicles with a Porsche badge.

Not only that, but it also can go a full 50 km (31.1 miles) on battery power alone. Porsche adds that EPA estimates on fuel returns will be posted closer to market launch. But who cares?

Routing the output towards the blacktop is an eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission, as well as a high-performance AWD system. Performance figures include a 0-to-60 mph time of 3.2 seconds, while top speed is rated at 192 mph. Standard spec includes ceramic brakes, dynamic chassis control, 21-inch wheels, and the Sport Chrono Package.

Inside is a 12.3-inch touchscreen, Apple CarPlay support, and the latest iteration of the Porsche Communication Management system, plus there’s an app that’ll let you remotely control the battery charging and set the cabin temperature settings. There’s also a long-wheelbase Executive iteration planned, if you’re feeling saucy.

The 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid will debut in the metal at the Geneva International Motor Show next month. Pricing starts at $184,400 for the standard model, while the Executive will start at $194,800.

Read more
2017 Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt

2017 Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt

German automaker’s newest Cayman variant gets the attention of a famous Porsche tuner

My colleague, Jonathan Lopez, made a compelling argument on why the Geneva Motor Show is the best annual auto show in the world. I wholeheartedly concur. At the very least, it’s without question the biggest and most attended auto show as automakers from all over the world showcase their latest wares, and in many cases, preview what’s to come. Aftermarket tuners are also heavily involved in Geneva with their new tuning programs and this year’s Geneva is no different with the likes of TechArt bringing with it a new tuning kit for the Porsche 718 Cayman.

As one of the industry’s leading tuners with anything related to Stuttgart’s finest, TechArt’s portfolio of Porsche tuning programs is as good as it gets. It’s worked on just about every iteration and variant of the 911. It also has experience working with the Panamera and Porsche’s two SUVs, the Cayenne and the Macan. Now, the German tuner is setting its sights on the newest member of the Cayman family with an extensive aftermarket upgrade program that tackles all important aspects of the sports car. Exterior upgrades? Check. Interior appointments? Check. Engine update? Check. Chassis and wheels? Check and check.

The result is what you’d expect from a tuner who knows its business like TechArt. Not only was it successful in dramatically altering the 718 Cayman’s appearance, but it also managed to bring more life to the sports car that only a tuner that knows what it’s doing can do.

The 718 Cayman tuning package is all set to make its debut at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. From there, expect the program to become available to eager-beaver owners of the sports coupe who are in the market for some aftermarket loving’ for their brand new Caymans.

Continue after the jump to read more about the Porsche 718 Cayman by TechArt.

Read more
2017 Porsche 911 R

2017 Porsche 911 R

A wingless, manual 911 GT3 for purists

Despite being fitted with one of the best automatic transmissions ever built, the latest 911 GT3 has received a lot of heat from Porsche purists. Sure, the PDK shifts amazingly quick and it’s specifically tuned to deliver the fastest lap times on the race track, but most gearheads claim the 911 GT3 would be a lot more fun with three pedals and a stick. I couldn’t agree more.

Even though Porsche has made it clear, more than once, that the manual gearbox will not return in the GT3, Stuttgart eventually came to its senses and developed a hardcore, naturally aspirated 911 with a manual transmission. The new model is called the 911 R – in a nod to a race-spec, 1967 model wearing the same badge – and uses GT3 underpinnings and the same engine as the GT3 RS.

Unveiled at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, the 911 R will be built in less than 1,000 units and, somewhat surprisingly, it will cost more than the range-topping GT3 RS. Keep reading to find out what makes the 911 R special and the amount of hard-earned money you’ll have to spend to take one home.

Updated 07/22/2016: Porsche announced the official U.S. prices on the new 911 R and also dropped a new video which highlights pretty much all there is to know on the new sports car. Hit "play" to watch it and go to "Prices" section for a full list of options.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Porsche 911 R.

Read more
New Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled

New Porsche 718 Boxster Unveiled

More speed, more power, old school name

It’s been two decades since Porsche first gave us the Boxster, and now Stuttgart is revitalizing the old standby mid-engine roadster with a new generation. It’s called the Porsche 718, and it takes inspiration from the winning flat-four-engined cars of the ‘50s and ‘60s. More importantly, it’s sharper, more powerful, and of course, even faster than the outgoing Boxster.

Let’s start with the powerplant. Customers will have two new engines to choose from, starting with a turbo 2.0-liter in the base 718 Boxster. Output is rated at 300 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque between 1,950 and 4,500 rpm. Next up is the 718 Boxster S, which gets a turbo 2.5-liter with 350 horsepower and 309 pound-feet of torque between 1,900 rpm and 4,500 rpm.

Those are significant gains over the outgoing model, which makes the 718 faster, too. Equip the base model with the optional PDK transmission and Sport Chrono Package, and you’re looking at a 0-to-60 mph time of 4.5 seconds, a 0.7-second improvement. Top speed is 170 mph, an 8-mph gain. Put the PDK and Sport Chrono Package on the S, and 0-to-60 mph is dispatched in 4.0 seconds (half a second quicker), while top speed is 177 mph (5 mph faster). Interestingly, Porsche claims both engines are also more efficient, and will provide exact EPA figures at a later date.

A six-speed manual comes standard. To complement the new engines, Porsche retuned the suspension and upgraded the brakes. The electric steering is now 10 percent quicker. Lateral acceleration enthusiasts are encouraged to opt for the Porsche Active Suspension Management system, which lowers ride height by 10 mm on the base model and 20 mm on the S.

Aesthetically, Porsche says it changed every body panel except the luggage compartment lids, windshield, and convertible top. There are larger intakes up front, as well as new headlights with a bi-xenon lighting element and LED DRLs. Full LED headlights with four-point DRLs are optional. The S gains standard 19-inch wheels with the option for 20-inchers. The rear is equipped with LED taillights.

Inside, the cabin gains a new dash. A touchscreen, 110-watt stereo, and Porsche Communication Management are standard, while navigation with voice control is optional.

The 718 and 718 S will arrive in U.S. dealerships late this June. Pricing starts at $56,000 for the base model, and $68,400 for the S. Expect a public debut at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

Read more