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The Iconic Porsche 962 C Has Been Restored to its Original Condition

The Iconic Porsche 962 C Has Been Restored to its Original Condition

The 962 C played a pivotal role in the development of the PDK transmission and has been brought back to its former glory after 18 grueling months of work

Porsche has refurbished a very special 962 C. The car seen here is chassis #009, which was completely restored to its original state by the Heritage Department and the Porsche Museum over the course of 18 grueling months.

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If It Wasn't For The Cayenne, Porsche Probably Wouldn't Exist Today

If It Wasn’t For The Cayenne, Porsche Probably Wouldn’t Exist Today

Not all superheroes are supercars

It’s hard to fathom the fact that the Porsche Cayenne has been around for almost two decades. During this time, Porsche’s first-ever SUV rose in popularity and became the brand’s best-seller, bringing in the required cash to keep the likes of 911 alive and kicking. This video explains very neatly how the Cayenne saved Porsche or better said, how Porsche saved itself with the Cayenne.

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Porsche Explains Why It Created The Rennsport Reunion: Video

Porsche Explains Why It Created The Rennsport Reunion: Video

Believe it or not, there are some flowers out there that take decades to bloom. Horticulturists keen on seeing such a rare event must be extraordinarily patient, carefully tending to these delicate plants in preparation for the day when they finally open up and reveal their full potential. Luckily Porschephiles have only had to wait three or four years for the Rennsport Reunion.

Originally taking place at Lime Rock in 2001, the Rennsport Reunion eventually found its way to the easily recognizable blacktop of Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca. This world-famous venue is the perfect place for such an event – its 11 turns and 2.24 miles are steeped in history, providing just the right backdrop for a rare collection of race and street cars to get out and stretch their collective legs.

This two-minute video explores what drives enthusiasts to this event. For some, it’s a chance to put these competition-ready vehicles back into their element, wringing out every tenth and doing what they do best. Some come for the opportunity to get close to cars they’ve only dreamed about; the fantasy made real in metal. For others, it’s a chance to recall forgotten memories and catch up with old friends over the familiar burble of an engine note from years ago.

No matter the reason, the Rennsport Reunion is a special event filled with special cars, and this video is an attempt at capturing some of that magic.

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Porsche RS History

Porsche RS History

Porsche’s history as a carmaker is seasoned with numerous achievements on both the road and the track, but very few are as celebrated as the introduction of the 911 Carrera RS in 1972. The "RS" badge holds the greatest fascination for both Porsche and sports car aficionados, which pretty much explains why Stuttgart revived the nameplate with each new generation of the 911.

It’s been a little more than four decades since the "RS" badge first appeared on a road car, and these naturally aspirated sports cars have evolved tremendously. Today’s 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS has double the amount of horsepower the original RS had, so 0-to-60 mph sprints have dropped from 6.3 seconds to just 3.1. Downright impressive back in 1972, the RS continues to inspire in 2015 as the main benchmark for track-focused sports cars.

But how did it all start and, more importantly, what made the RS (Rennsport — German for "racing") the world’s most venerated sports car nameplate? To answer those questions, I compiled a history of the evolution of the Porsche RS, dating back to 1957, when the iconic 911 wasn’t even on "Butzi" Porsche’s drawing table.

Continue reading for the full story.

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Video: Meet Porsche's First 911 Turbo

Video: Meet Porsche’s First 911 Turbo

The Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, Germany holds many of the automaker’s treasures. The likes of which we won’t see any where in the world. One of them is Louise Piëch’s 911 Turbo, which was given to her as a birthday present. And the above video puts this car in the spotlight.

Who is Louise Piëch, and why is her 911 Turbo in the Museum?

First of all, Louise Piëch is the daughter of Porsche founder Ferdinand Porsche. She is also the mother of current Volkswagen chairman Ferdinand Piëch, making her a pretty big deal inside Porsche’s world.

So why is her 911 Turbo so special? It’s because that specific 911 Turbo is considered the very first example of the model.

It was produced in 1973, one year before Porsche officially released the 911 Turbo. The 911 Turbo has since become the crown jewel of a lineup that has no shortage of awesomeness.

This video is the story of the first 911 Turbo, a car that ironically didn’t have a Turbo badge because Piëch apparently didn’t want to draw any attention to it. She also didn’t like anything obstructing her natural view of the environment; so at her behest, Porsche didn’t add tint on the car’s windows.

One thing she didn’t mind about the 911 Turbo was the power, as its 3.0-liter engine packed a healthy 260 horsepower. On top of that, the first 911 Turbo has quite the reputation for being rather challenging to handle, thanks to the slow spool and instant-on power once the turbocharger gets moving.

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NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Speedster

NCMA Porsche by Design: Porsche 356 Speedster

One of the most notable and memorable of the early Porsche cars is the Speedster. This car actually came into existence at the insistence of U.S. distributor Max Hoffman. He was able to convince Ferdinand Porsche that there was a market for a “stripper” car. A stripper is essentially a barebones Roadster that could be easily converted into a racing specification car without too much trouble. The low level of standard equipment also kept prices low, leaving you more budget for race gear and modifications.

This particular Black Speedster here carries a particularly special heritage. It was owned by none other than James Dean, twice. Dean bought the car to race in SCCA competition, but after a few years he sold it to a car collector named Bruce Meyers. Later in 1974 Dean bought the car back from Bruce. This particular model does not wear a Speedster badge as Dean had it removed from the car during his first ownership.

Porsche dropped the Speedster model from the 356 lineup in 1959 in favor of building the newer Convertible D cars. Only 3,122 of Speedsters were ever constructed.

When the cars first entered production there were powered by a 1.5-liter flat-four engine that produced 64 horsepower. Before the production ended, you could order a race-ready Carrera spec model with 128 horsepower. With the proper gearing in the transmission, a Speedster could reach speeds of over 125 mph, making it one of the fastest cars of the era.

Dean’s car here was a mid-range “Super” model that managed 88 horsepower from its 1.6-liter engine. The car is still in Dean’s family under the ownership of his son, Chad.

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Porsche Details 50th Anniversary Plans for the 911

Porsche Details 50th Anniversary Plans for the 911

Ok, we get it now. Apparently, 1963 was a pretty big year for the auto industry, the kind of eventful 12 months that eventually deserved 50th anniversary celebrations.

Well that time has come and fittingly enough, we’ve been besieged with so many of these anniversary news that it’s becoming hard to keep track of all of them.

The latest to hop on the growing trend is Porsche. While they’re not really celebrating their 50th year in existence (they already did that in 1981), they are celebrating the golden anniversary of their most iconic model, the Porsche 911.

Obviously, a car of the 911’s stature deserves the best kind of happy birthday events and it appears that Porsche isn’t about to let its baby down. The German automaker recently announced a string of special events dedicated to the 911, beginning with the ‘Retro Classics’ automobile show in Stuttgart. It’s going to be at this exhibit where Porsche will exhibit four of the most iconic 911 models in history, including the pre-series Type 754 T7, considered as the core of the first ever 911 that was designed by founder Ferdinand Porsche.

From there, the 1967 model 911 will embark on a year-long world tour that will take it to five continents, and appear in motorsports events and exhibits in California, China, Paris, Australia and the UK.

Another exhibit, called the "50 Years of the Porsche 911", will be open from June 4 to September 29 2013. Concluding the anniversary extravaganza is the publishing of a new “911×911″ anniversary book that chronicles the entire history of Porsche’s most legendary model.

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Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part Two

Video: Porsche Museum Secrets Part Two

We pretty much just finished the Museum Secrets Part One video and Porsche has already graced us with part two of this awesome series. The Museum Secrets series is outlining the new storage facility for the Porsche Museum and also showing us a glimpse of some of the most awesome cars that pass through the museum.

Part One focused mainly on the storage facility and Porsche’s overall history, then showed us just one car, which was the first ever 911 Turbo. Part two, thankfully, focuses a lot more on the storage facilities contents – a ton of rare Porsches. The guys at Porsche outlined seven cars for us, some of which we never knew even existed.

The video’s pretty sweet and the cars are absolutely awesome, so check out the video. If you would like a quick peak at what’s in the video, click past the jump and you’ll see our quick summary on each car shown.

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1998 Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

1998 Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion

In the mid-1990s, Porsche unveiled the 911 GT1 - a race car specially developed for the GT1 class of sportscar racing. Despite being called a "911," the GT1 had very little in common with the 911: only the frontal chassis was shared with the 993 911, while almost every other element was borrowed from the Porsche 962, including the flat-six engine.

During its first appearance at the 1996 Le Mans, the GT1 walked away with a second and third overall finish, as well as first and second in class. Despite these finishes, Porsche still wanted more, so in 1997, they came up with the GT1 Evo - a model that featured aerodynamic tweaks to the bodywork and a revision of the suspension. These changes helped the GT1 score more victories, including a one-two finish at Le Mans in 1998, where it beat out teams from McLaren, Toyota, and Panoz.

Not willing to let the fun rest solely on the track, Porsche set out to make a street-legal version of the award-winning GT1, which is then dubbed the Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion. The model was limited to only 25 units and cost a cool $912,000.

Hit the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 GT1 Strassenversion.

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1957 Porsche 356A 1600 Sportster

1957 Porsche 356A 1600 Sportster

Back in the early years of Porsche, technology was very limited and cars were, of course, far simpler than they are today. This meant that they also typically had much less power than today’s cars. There is no better example of said simplicity than looking at a Porsche from the 1950s and comparing it to today’s Porsches.

The most beloved Porsche of the `50s is far and away the 1600 Sportster. This compact roadster was far from fast, but it was always regarded as a nimble a fun-to-drive car. The 356A Sportster of the late 1950s is actually given a lion’s share of the credit for revolutionizing the sports car realm and showed that a car doesn’t need to be high-powered to be fun to drive.

With only 2,922 Speedsters ever built, it has become a true collector’s item that garners a ton of attention and money, especially when one hits the auction block. Well, that is exactly what we have, as RM Auctions is selling off a 1957 Porsche 356A 1600 Speedster in Monterey, California on August 17th and 18th, 2012.

Click past the jump to read all about this model being auctioned off.

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Volkswagen and Porsche Successfully Perform the Avoid-the-Taxman Dance

Volkswagen and Porsche Successfully Perform the Avoid-the-Taxman Dance

We all know that when you buy or sell anything of significant worth, the gummament is not too far away with its hand out asking for its share. It doesn’t care which side it comes from, just as long as someone pays “The Man.” Well, when VW AG decided it was time to buyout the remaining 50.1 percent of Porsche and get its former ownership group completely out of the picture, we were talking billions of Euros, €4.5 billion to be exact.

Well, even in Germany, “The Man,” or better yet “Der Mann,” is there in the form of the Baden-Württemberg Finance Ministry asking for his cut of the deal, which would total about €1.5 billion ($1.9 million). This was just about the breaking point of the entire deal, as a part of the buyout was that VW pays the tax.

After five months of massaging the numbers, looking at the laws, and manipulating things in ways that would make a business ethics major cringe, VW and Porsche are about to pull off this deal 100 percent tax free. How they pulled this off was simple enough… The only real sticking point was the fact that VW had to find out how to manipulate the deal into a corporate restructuring, as opposed to a sale.

To achieve a restructuring classification instead of a buy-sell classification, VW gave Porsche the €4.5 billion buying price, but included in that price a single voting share of VW stock… Yeah, that’s it. One little piece of paper that says “I can vote on important issues” saved VW €1.5 billion. Gotta love those tax attorneys.

The deal has yet to be approved by state authorities, but sans any omissions or errors, this looks to be a final deal that gives VW the title to Porsche, instead of just a rental contract.

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Replica Window Stickers that Look Their Age by Stuttgart Studios

Replica Window Stickers that Look Their Age by Stuttgart Studios

The window sticker is an often forgotten item when you buy a car. For the most part, we just rip them off and throw them out, and this act of removing the sticker has been commonplace for decades. Most often, the only time a window sticker is saved is when the car is a collector’s item straight off of the showroom floor. This leaves two options, don’t display a window sticker at all, or have a brand-new-looking replica made that stands out like tank tracks on a WRX.

Well, that’s no longer the case for Porsche owners, as Stuttgart Studios offers replica delivery stickers with optional aging and weathering, giving them an authentic look. By using your Porsche’s VIN, Stuttgart determines all of the codes that were on the original window sticker and creates the sticker just as it was in real life. For an extra cost of $14.95, Stuttgart will add “Motif” to your sticker, which gives it a look and feel that a decades-old window sticker should have.

Judging by the examples that Stuttgart has on its site, it very well might be worth the base $99.95 price to have a sticker made, then the additional $14.95 for the “Motif.” What’s even cooler is that they don’t have just one “Motif” that every sticker gets. They list a total of 12 “Motif” selections on the website, but imply that there are many more options.

This definitely gets TopSpeed’s “Ultimate Niche Marketing” award for 2012. How in the heck these folks came up with this idea is beyond us, but it’s definitely a great idea.

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Bill Gates' old 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo hitting the auction block

Bill Gates’ old 1979 Porsche 911 Turbo hitting the auction block

We’re all aware of who Bill Gates is as he’s remained one of the richest people in the world for the better part of two decades. But just like any other successful businessmen, Gates started off with relatively humble beginnings studying at Harvard University in the early 1970’s, before founding the company which has made him so wealthy, Microsoft, in 1975.

Just four years after founding the company, Bill gates purchased an awesome Porsche 911 Turbo and registered it in Seattle, Washington. That same Porsche was then sold in the ’90’s, but has recently resurfaced and will be put up for auction with Gates’ signed registration details. The auction will be in Vienna, Austria in the coming days and we expect this particular 911 Turbo to fetch a handy amount.

The current owner selling the car is said to have repainted the 911 to the bright blue seen in the above picture. He then got Porsche Classic to kick-start additional life into the sports car by uprating its standard 3.3-liter flat-six engine which when stock, produced 300HP. That was a mighty impressive feat for a car in that era.

The 911 Turbo is expected to sell for between $55,500 and $71,000 when it’s put under the hammer on the June 6,2012. Even though it’s unclear how the Porsche made its way to Austria from the U.S., it is clear that it has lived a very privileged life and hopefully it goes to a suitable home.

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1989 Porsche 911 Speedster

1989 Porsche 911 Speedster

For what seems like forever, Porsche has turned out beautiful sports cars one after another and many times these beauties packed quite a punch too. One of these brawn-meets-beauty machines was the limited production 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster.

This model marked the first time that the “Speedster” moniker was slapped on a Porsche in 30 years, as the last one was the 1959 Porsche 356 Speedster. This model was coming at a rather awkward time though, as the U.S. was in a recession and Porsche was really starting to struggle. The famed automaker was banking on this limited model to help re-launch the “Porsche “ name in the minds of enthusiasts.

With its stylish lines and extremely high-powered six-cylinder engine, this model indeed helped thrust Porsche back to what it once was. The question is how does this aging high-performance machine stand up in today’s market?

Well, we will find out soon enough, as one of these rare 911 Speedsters is about to hit the auction block on via RM Auctions on June 9th through 10th in Hampton, NJ.

Click past the jump to read our full review on this classic Porsche

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Porsche 911 Designer Passes Away at Age 76

Porsche 911 Designer Passes Away at Age 76

When the Porsche 911 debuted in the 1965 model year, it revolutionized the sports car, turning it from a crude performance machine to a performance machine with some class and sophistication. The man behind the design of this now legendary machine, Ferdinand Porsche, has passed away at the age of 76 and the cause of death has not been released.

The 911 is one of the few cars that, with the exception of some basic restyling and technological advances, still looks strikingly similar to its original model. The 911 also remains one of the top luxury sports cars in the world. This is a great tribute to the designing genius of F.A. Porsche, as those inside of the company knew him.

Porsche was born on December 11, 1935 and quickly got into the family business as just a young boy, though not actually on the payroll. It was not until he competed his schooling in 1958 that he joined the company as an employee. Just four years later, he took over the design studio at Porsche.

In the 1970s, Porsche left the company in the control of other family members and focused on designing eyeglasses, watches, and pens in his own studio, dubbed Porsche Design Studio. From 1990 to 1993, he rejoined Porsche AG, as a chairman, and helped guide the company back to greatness after a steep decline in sales through the 1980s.

Despite the fact that F.A. Porsche is really only well known for designing one model of vehicle, that model will keep him a legend forever. Fortunately for all of us, the spirit and ingenuity of Professor Ferdinand Alexander Porsche will live on for many years to come in the form of his creation, the Porsche 911.

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Video: Porsche chronicles its Le Mans history

Video: Porsche chronicles its Le Mans history

Of all the automakers that have participated in the legendary 24-hour race at Le Mans since 1923, German automaker Porsche holds the distinction of being the most successful marque in the history of the racing series. Truth be told, Porsche has a record 94 class wins and 16 overall victories, highlighted by a dominant stretch from 1981 to the 1987 when it scored the title for seven straight years.

Lately, Porsche has ceded control of Le Mans to the likes of Audi and Peugeot, scoring its last overall victory in 1998 with the 911 GT1-98. After years of toiling in the shadows, the German automaker is getting ready to return to Le Mans in 2014, determined to return back to the throne it previously occupied.

Preparations are in order for the first LMP1 prototype to be developed soon, and knowing Porsche’s history in Le Mans, we expect nothing less than a car that can contend for the the Le Mans title when it returns to the track.

Speaking of its history, the German automaker has prepared a number of videos detailing the company’s history in Le Mans, going all the way back from its early years to its recent dominance in the 90’s.

Check out the rest of the video series from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s after the jump.

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