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2019 Porsche Macan

2019 Porsche Macan

The Macan gains a mild facelift before the next-gen model hits dealers

Introduced in 2014, the Porsche Macan is the company’s second SUV. Slotted below the popular Cayenne, it’s also Porsche’s smallest crossover yet. The German firm updated the Macan for the 2019 model year, calling it a second-generation model.

When Porsche decided to step into the SUV segment with the Cayenne, Porsche purists weren’t all that happy, expecting the brand to soldier on with different 911 variants until times end. But, the Cayenne turned out to be a huge success, and the German brand decided to come out with a compact model named the Macan. While not as popular as the Cayenne, the Macan was also met with great enthusiasm. Porsche delivered more than 350,000 units from 2014 until 2018, with more than 25 percent of them shipped to China. As a result, the Germans paid big attention to this upgrade and made significant changes inside and out. Unfortunately, those of you who expected more powerful engines will be disappointed. But more on that in the review below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Macan.

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Porsche Macan Gains 911 Looks, More Equipment

Porsche Macan Gains 911 Looks, More Equipment

The 911 of the compact crossover market

Introduced in 2014 as a smaller alternative to the already iconic Cayenne, the Porsche Macan is a sales success with more than 350,000 units delivered in four years. The German manufacturer is now looking to add to the momentum with a mid-cycle update that makes the crossover sportier than ever before and adds new equipment inside the cabin.

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The Porsche Cayenne Coupé Has Finally Been Confirmed

The Porsche Cayenne Coupé Has Finally Been Confirmed

It’s a sedan... It’s an SUV... Wait, It’s a Coupé!

It’s official. After hearing all the rumors surrounding the coupé version of the Cayenne, we finally have the answer. Autocar has learned from the Porsche boss, Oliver Blume, that a Cayenne Coupé is more than just hot-talk, and we might see it hit the roads at some point in 2019. Is it going to be a practical car or just a desirable asset with a heavy depreciation?

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Meet the Porsche Speedster Concept, A 500-Horsepower Six-Speed Monster

Meet the Porsche Speedster Concept, A 500-Horsepower Six-Speed Monster

A nod to the Stuttgart old school

There’s quite a few big changes going on at Porsche at the moment, but the German brand hasn’t forgot where it came from, as evidenced by this concept throwback that may or may not get a full production version.

Continue reading for the full story.

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A Naturally Aspirated Flat-Six Will Motivate the Upcoming Porsche Cayman GT4

A Naturally Aspirated Flat-Six Will Motivate the Upcoming Porsche Cayman GT4

No boost, at least not yet!

If you have even a passing interest in fast cars, then you gotta love the sound of a howling all-atmosphere six-cylinder Porsche powerplant. Luckily, it looks like that’s exactly what we’ll be hearing from the next Cayman GT4, as confirmed by Porsche’s head of GT car development, Andreas Preuninger.

Continue reading for the full story.

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2019 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid Unveiled

2019 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid Unveiled

Stuttgart’s iconic SUV finds new plug-in power

Porsche just unveiled the latest iteration of its popular Cayenne performance SUV, and this time around, it’s got extra electric oomph to back it. Once again taking inspiration from the Earth-shattering 918 Spyder, the new Cayenne mounts a plug-in hybrid powertrain under the hood, with a 3.0-liter V-6 making 340 horsepower and an electric motor making 136 horsepower. Together they produce upwards of 462 horsepower and 700 Nm of torque (516 pound-feet of torque). A run from 0 to 62 mph is done in 5 seconds flat, while the 0-to-60 mph run is done in 4.7 seconds. Top speed is rated at 253 km/h (157 mph).

Meanwhile, the Cayenne PHEV will travel 44 km (27 miles) and achieve a top speed of 135 km/h (84 mph) using the electric motor only. To help it get there, the battery capacity was increased to 14.1 kWh, as compared to the 10.8 kWh of the previous model, a 30-percent increase overall. Plug it into a 230-volt connection, and it’ll charge in a little under eight hours, while a 7.3-kW charger reduces that time to 2.3 hours.

Active hang-on AWD helps it grip, as does the standard Porsche Active Suspension Management system. Options include the Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control roll stabilization system, as well as a trailer hitch that lets you to tow up to 3.5 metric tons (7,716 pounds).

Inside, you’ll find a heads-up display, adaptive cruise control, and massaging seats, while the exterior is blinged out with 22-inch alloy wheels.

Sales kick off next year starting at just under $80,000.

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2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Unveiled

2019 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Unveiled

The latest and greatest Stuttgart superstar born for the track

Porsche just revealed the new 2019 911 GT3 RS ahead of its official debut at the 2018 Geneva International Motor Show. As the third road-legal GT model Porsche has unveiled in a year, this thing oozes racing prowess from every pore, taking the tried-and-true GT3formula to the next level.

The beating heart of the machine is made up 4.0-liters of all-atmosphere displacement in the rear. Liberal application of gasoline yields as much as 520 horsepower and 346 pound-feet of torque, 20 ponies more than the current GT3, making this flat-six the most powerful naturally aspirated powerplant ever used in a road-legal 911. Redline is set at a howling 9,000 rpm, which you can bet sounds amazing coming through the titanium exhaust system.

Making the connection to the rear axle is a tuned-up seven-speed PDK gearbox. All told, the GT3 RS will do the 0-to-60 mph run in 3 seconds flat, two-tenths quicker than the current PDK-equipped 911 GT3 and a tenth quicker than the outgoing GT3 RS. Top speed is rated at 193 mph.

Making the most of the power is a Porsche Active Suspension Management system, which includes active engine mounts, a fully variable electronic locking differential, and freshly tweaked rear-axle steering. Drivers can tune the handling via the ride height, toe, camber, caster, and sway bars. Short stops come courtesy of standard iron rotors, or the optional lightweight Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes rocking 410 mm (16.1-inch) front discs and 390 mm (15.4-inch) rear discs.

You’ll also find the traditional fixed rear wing, tweaked polyurethane front and rear fascias, a larger front lip spoiler and side skirts, and a rear underbody diffusor, plus NACA ducts in front to help cool the brakes. All told, the new GT3 RS produces twice as much downforce as the standard 911 GT3 when traveling at 124 mph.

The new model is also quite light. The front trunk lid, fenders, and rear deck lid are all made from carbon fiber, while the roof is made from magnesium. There’s also lightened glass for the rear and side windows, lightened door panels, less sound insulation, and a rear seat delete. The optional Wiessach package replaces several parts with additional carbon fiber, cutting 13 pounds, while the optional magnesium wheels cut even more weight. Standard spec includes forged alloy wheels measuring in at 20 inches in front and 21 inches in the rear. In its lightest configuration, the 2019 GT3 RS tips the scales at 3,153 pounds.

Inside is the usual track-ready equipment, such as carbon fiber-laced bucket seats and a 360 mm (14.2-inch) steering wheel wrapped in Alcantara and complete with a yellow 12 o’clock marker.

Look for the 2019 Porsche GT3 RS at the Geneva International Motor Show in March. Order books are open now, with pricing set at $187,500.

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2018 Porsche 718 GTS Unveiled

2018 Porsche 718 GTS Unveiled

A little extra get-up-and-go for the Stuttgart standard

Porsche just announced new GTS iterations for the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, offering more power, more standard equipment, and blacked-out exterior trim. The star of the show is the mid-mounted, turbocharged, 2.5-liter flat-four engine, which gets a power boost thanks to a new intake plenum and turbo optimization. Peak output now comes 365 horsepower, a 15-horse increase compared to the existing 718 S. Making the cog swaps is a standard six-speed manual, although a seven-speed PDK automatic is also available. Torque is rated at 317 pound-feet if you get the PDK and 309 pound-feet for the manual. Acceleration to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds with the PDK, while top speed is rated at 180 mph.

Helping it corner is a standard mechanical rear-differential lock and Porsche Torque Vectoring. The Sport Chrono Package, Porsche Active Suspension Management, and a sport exhaust are also standard.

Aesthetically, the new GTS models get black 20-inch wheels, as well as a tweaked front fascia, tinted lights, black badges and trim, and black tips for the exhaust. Inside, you get a standard chronometer on the dash, as well as standard sport seating with the GTS logo embroidered into the headrests. Alcantara is the material of choice for the upholstery, and can also be found on the steering wheel, center console, and armrests.

Pricing starts at $79,900 for the Cayman and $81,900 for the Boxster, which is about $26,000 more than the standard models. Order books are open now, with deliveries expected for March of next year.

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2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo Unveiled

2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo Unveiled

Stuttgart goes big with the range-topper Panamera wagon

Porsche first introduced the Panamera in 2009 at the Shanghai Auto Show, and since then, we’ve seen a plethora of models and updates. The second generation arrived just last year, and now, there’s a new flagship iteration dubbed the Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo. Put all those names together, and what you’re left with is a twin-turbocharged 4.0-liter V-8 mated with an electric motor, offering both rip-snortin’ performance and plug-in hybrid eco friendliness, as the mood may strike you. The electric motor makes 136 horses all by itself, while the V-8 makes 550 horsepower. Working in concert, they produce 680 horsepower and 626 pound-feet of torque, essentially making this new Panamera one of the most powerful Porsches ever.

Outside, you’ll find active aero like an adjustable roof spoiler, as well as 21-inch wheels. Handling stuff includes the option for rear-axle steering, plus standard spec like Porsche’s branded ceramic brakes, dynamic chassis control, and torque vectoring. Keeping it shiny side up is a three-chamber air suspension system. Meanwhile, the power makes its way to the pavement by way of an eight-speed PDK transmission, as well as an active AWD system. Important numbers look like 3.2 seconds for the 0-to-60 mph run, 11.6 seconds in the quarter mile, and a top speed of 192 mph. Fuel mileage and range will be announced closer to launch. Pricing is set at $188,400. Look for it in dealers next spring, and read on for further details.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid.

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The 2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo: An SUV with Attitude and Sports Car Performance

The 2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo: An SUV with Attitude and Sports Car Performance

Welcome to the world of crazy performance in a tall package

Porsche introduced the third-gen Cayenne in August of 2017 with a mildly revised exterior, new technology, and a revised engine lineup that’s good for 340 ponies in base form or 440 ponies in S form. At the time I reviewed the new Cayenne, I speculated that Porsche would have to come up with a solution for the Turbo model as it needed to squeeze a considerable amount of extra power from that 2.9-liter V-6 or would have to go with a V-8 as it has in the past. Just a couple of weeks after the third-gen Cayenne debuted, Porsche showed up to the Frankfurt Auto Show with the new Cayenne Turbo, and as it turns out, I’m better than Miss Cleo, as the new Turbo sure does make use of a V-8 that’s good for 550 ponies – an improvement of 30 ponies and there’s some extra torque on tap too. More importantly, however, is the fact that this V-8 is new, and displaces 4.0-liters – about 800cc less than the V-8 in the last-gen model.

Of course, there’s not a lot of difference between the base, S, and Turbo models, but there are a few differences to point out. It does get the same headlights and the same general fascia, however, those side intakes are much larger on the Turbo model, and the grill traverses the full width between the side intakes instead of being split by the fascia on the ends. There are no fog lights to speak of up front, and the radiator grille itself is much more open in comparison. In the rear, the only real differences include the rear diffuser, which is now more defined and the square exhaust outlets. 21-inch wheels that are exclusive to the Turbo model can be found in each corner and match the wide wheel arches quite nicely, I might add. But, there’s more than exterior looks to talk about here, including some nice extras inside and that new V-8 under to hood, so let’s talk more about that.

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The Third-Gen Porsche Cayenne Makes a Symphonious Debut in Stuttgart

The Third-Gen Porsche Cayenne Makes a Symphonious Debut in Stuttgart

Yes, this really is a new-gen model despite the way it looks.

A huge symphony projected onto a massive display, and a large number of dancers in white robes set the mood for the third-gen Porsche Cayenne to roll onto the stage for its first official outing at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart. When you think of a new-gen model making its debut, you expect to see something quite different, but with the Cayenne, it was more about honing perfection instead of trying to reinvent the model. And, while some may have their reservations about it (perhaps even me included,) beauty runs much deeper than the skin on this baby. First off, the body is now all aluminum from front to rear (minus a few pieces of plastic cladding, of course) which contributed to a weight loss of around 65 kilo or 143.3 pounds. That’s the weight of a small human, and when you add in the fact that it gets more power, there’s no doubt about it, the new Cayenne has all that sports car DNA Porsche was aiming for. How did it make this possible? Well, I’m glad you asked.

For starters, a new rear axle steering system is standard equipment for better maneuverability while a three-chamber suspension system keeps the ride on point. What’s more important, however, is the power upgrades that contribute to better performance. The base model gets a 3.0-liter that’s good for 340 horsepower, a 40-pony improvement, and 331 pound-feet of torque. The Cayenne S, which gets the 2.9-liter V-6, will deliver a tasty 440 horsepower (20 extra ponies) and 405 pound-feet of twist. They can hit 62 mph in 6.2 and 5.2 seconds, respectively. If you opt for the Sport Chrono package, those figures drop to 5.9 and 4.9 seconds. Maximum speed for both models is pegged at 164 mph. As for the interior, there are some nice changes in play as well, including better digitization of the instrument cluster (all but the central analog gauge) and a large, 12.3-inch touchscreen display in the center stack. New HVAC vents help to provide a fresh look while the typical support handles on the doors and console have been moved forward a bit. Cargo capacity has increased to 27.19 cubic-feet, an improvement of 3.53 cubic-feet over the outgoing model. This can be attributed to its slightly longer stance, which was increased by nearly 2.5 inches. Finally, and arguably most important for the interior, is the new button panel on the center console. Where there were once analog buttons clustered together now sits a glass touch screen with lots of digital buttons. It’s a nice touch, to say the least.

And there you have it. There are of course other little details to talk about, but we’ll cover that in our full review, which will be updated in the next 24 hours. For now, you can rest your mind knowing that the third-gen Cayenne starts out in Germany from €74,828 while the Cayenne S goes for €91,964, both including VAT. Those figures convert to $85,590 and $110,106, respectively. The third-gen Cayenne isn’t available for the U.S. quite yet, but if you’re over there in Germany, you can stop by your local dealer and place your order now.

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Your Must-Have Porsche 911 GT2 RS Wallpapers

Your Must-Have Porsche 911 GT2 RS Wallpapers

Because it’s the meanest road-going 911 to roll off the line

We’ve all been craving a new 911 GT2 since the 991.2 generation kicked off a couple of years ago. It took a while, and two debuts (if you count the E3 debut) to finally get here, but here we are, and we couldn’t be happier. Just look at it. Race-bred, road-going, German goodness at its best. The best aerodynamics in the game, with looks that would give any self-respecting car enthusiast a sizeable stiffy. And, if the looks alone aren’t enough for you, there’s that Turbo S-derived 3.8-liter flat-six that’s good for an astounding 700 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 553 pound-feet of pavement chewing, Nurburgring-terrorizing torque. It’ll put you in your seat hard on takeoff and get your ass up to 60 mph in a matter of just 2.7 seconds while aiming for a top speed that is officially rated at 211 mph. For the record, that’s 0.8-seconds faster to 60 and 6 mph faster overall when compared to its predecessor. Time to trade in, folks!

In Honor of the finest 911 to roll out of Germany this year, or any year for that matter, we’ve decided to lump together the best wallpapers we have so far – just so we can all celebrate the greatness that is the Porsche 911 GT2 RS. And, that’s the best we can do, considering the word is that all 1,000 units have been sold. And, since Porsche is vetting its purchasers, there probably won’t be one on the used market for a while either. So, the next best thing is a sexy shot of it greeting you on your desktop every morning. You like the front end? We got you! You like the booty? We’ve got some of that too. Keep on reading to get your satisfying dose of 911 wallpaper goodness.

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