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Here's Why the Porsche 996 was the Best Porsche 911 When it Came Out

Here’s Why the Porsche 996 was the Best Porsche 911 When it Came Out

The Porsche 996 gets a lot of hate, but there are a lot of good things about it

The Porsche 911 is a car that doesn’t need an introduction. Since 1964, the rear-engine sports car from Stuttgart has set the benchmark for performance cars around the globe. That said, every family has a black sheep, and sadly, the 996 generation of the Porsche 911 has been branded as one. According to many, it was a deviation from Porsche’s traditional way of doing things, but we are here to tell you that the 996 was, in fact, superior to all its predecessors when it came out - here’s why.

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Porsche Taycan Quirks and Features

Porsche Taycan Quirks and Features

Nine facts and much more you have to know about the new Porsche Taycan

The problem with small craft beer companies isn’t about the quality of their products or the innovation behind it. It is about the scale. When the demand picks up, they cannot deliver - the quality goes down, and waiting time goes up. That is why not many alcohol drink representatives want to work with small scale craft beer producers. I am telling you this because we have something similar in the car world as well. When the demand picked up for the Tesla-produced cars, the company could not meet the expectations. No matter what it did. So, when a car like the Porsche Taycan comes to the market, it is a whole different story. It has Porsche and the entire Volkswagen Group behind it. These people do meet expectations, and these are all the quirks and features you need to know about the Taycan to believe it.

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11 Little-Known Facts About the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

11 Little-Known Facts About the 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport

The 2019 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport is a model full of secrets

Although the latest mid-engined Porsche 718 cars debuted only with turbocharged four-cylinder engines, the secret work on the 718 Cayman GT4 with an N/A engine was going strong somewhere in the bowels of the Stuttgart car giant. The first, track-focused and NOT road-going 718 Cayman GT4, dubbed the Clubsport, only recently released the howl of its 3.8-liter N/A engine to the world.

And it is an epic moment.

We got ourselves a first look at the one of the most stunning racing cars that ever were. In two guises - the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport Trackday for amateur racers, and the 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport Competition for pros.

Both of them adopted the glorious racing pedigree of the Porsche 911 GT3 cars and basically took over some of its technology. Then, Porsche gifted them with a whole set of additions that considerably changed their nature compared with to the standard 718 Cayman. Finally, the718 GT4 Clubsportgives us a glimpse into what the real, road-going 718 Cayman GT4 will be like. Yup, it’s coming. Probably not with the naturally aspirated six-cylinder, though. Disappointed?

Now, I will sink deep into the intricacies of the latest 718 Cayman GT4 Clubsport and reveal some facts you probably did not know at all.

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8 Little Known Facts About The 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T and Cayman T

8 Little Known Facts About The 2019 Porsche 718 Boxster T and Cayman T

The awesome Porsche 718 made a whole lot better

Widely known as Porsches you can have the most fun with, the 718 Boxster and the 718 Cayman were just updated for 2019. Revealed in red, the 718 Boxster T and the 718 Cayman T feature some added gear never before offered for entry-level cars and at a discount, too. In order to make both of them even better than before, Porsche reached into its bin of wonders and integrated some serious gear into the 718 Ts. Yet, the path to driving fun and saving weight led it to make some serious sacrifices. If you really want the purest possible experience, prepare to drive without navigation and without a radio. That’s how the 718 T is rolling.

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17 Must-Know Facts About The 992-Gen 2020 Porsche 911

17 Must-Know Facts About The 992-Gen 2020 Porsche 911

It’s simply the best

As one of the most recognizable names in the car industry, the Porsche 911 is expected to evolve with every new generation and the new 992-gen isn’t any different. The 2020 Porsche 911 992 takes some crucial evolutive steps that didn’t cause a drastic transformation, but it did transform it into something better. In every conceivable way. I am giving you 17 facts that prove the new 992 911 is far more than just a redesign. It is a reimagination on such a scale that the 911 kept all the traits of the predecessor, but all traits Porsche engineers and magicians could possibly enhance were incrementally improved.

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Porsche CEO Makes a Classic Mistake that Could Cost the Brand Dearly

Porsche CEO Makes a Classic Mistake that Could Cost the Brand Dearly

You should never underestimate the other guy…

So, when it comes to long-range electric cars, Elon Musk is the pretty much the godfather, the don mega, and the man that pretty much made it happen with models like the Tesla Roadster, and even more so with the Tesla Model S. Fast forward to today and there’s now the Tesla Model X and the Tesla Model 3, with a Semi truck on the way and a smaller SUV that will mirror the Model 3 in pricing. Despite Tesla’s slow but continuous move to become an automaker for the masses (and it has come a long way) it’s still not able to keep up with the big boys quite yet – profits are still virtually non-existent and it takes an excessive amount of time to cut down the initial waiting list for new cars. But, in time, Tesla could be just as busy and successful as any of the big boys, including Chevy, Ford, Chrysler, Audi, BMW, and yes, even Porsche. As electric cars become more standard around the world, the effect will increase drastically until Tesla is practically a household name (not that it isn’t in mine already)

Now that the big boys are all about to step into Elon’s self-made niche, it’s time to start thinking about automakers that should be worried a brand like Tesla that already has an insanely massive cult following and is getting more affordable as time goes on. All of the major brands are about 30 seconds away from unleashing a serious EV offensive. Meanwhile, Porsche is over here, about to knock some heads with the Porsche Mission E and about to make a huge, huge mistake. CEO, Oliver Blume – the man that replaced Matthias Muller and was once Porsche’s head of production – doesn’t think that Tesla is a competitor.

Talking to The Financial Times in a recent interview, he even went so far as to say that the production version of the Mission E, which is due for production by 2019, “is not a Tesla fighter.” He went on to say that “it’s not so important what Tesla does. Porsche is going to follow its own way.” He chalks off his lack of concern for the brand that practically dispatched range anxiety for the masses by assuming that he doesn’t have to worry about it because Porsche’s main concern is making profit. OF course, we all know that he’s at least partially right, as Tesla doesn’t really know what profit is in the grand scheme of things, but just because the brand operates as more of a tech startup than a true-to-life, mass-production automaker doesn’t mean that he shouldn’t be concerned.

Keep reading for the rest of the story

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Which Sports Car Should Be Revived?

Which Sports Car Should Be Revived?

Between 2016 and 2020 the list of supercars will include the Ford GT, the Mercedes-AMG Project One, the Aston Man Valkyrie, and at least one new car from Ferrari. But what are sports cars fans with smaller wallets supposed to do? We have some great cars like the Miata and BMW is bringing a Z4 replacement soon, but so many great cars don’t exist anymore. Especially in the “affordable” range.

So we started talking in the office about what sports cars we want to see revived, and we settled on a pair of classic sports cars and one car that is officially dead, but not out of showrooms yet. The Porsche 944, Honda S2000, and the Dodge Viper are all in our dream garage of dead cars we want to return. Keep reading to find out why!

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Porsche Panamera Wagon – Practical Speed, Or Expensive Façade?

Porsche Panamera Wagon – Practical Speed, Or Expensive Façade?

New style, same problem

Full disclosure – I love wagons. Hell, I drive one in real life. You know, outside. Any time an automaker produces a wagon instead of another SUC, er I mean SUV, I’m usually one of the first to stand up and shake the ‘ole pompoms. Make the thing fast, and well, I couldn’t be happier. Which should make me a dead ringer for loving the Panamera Wagon, right? Not exactly. For some reason, the upcoming hatch from Stuttgart hasn’t sat right with me. For a while, I wasn’t sure why – yeah, it isn’t “pretty,” but I wouldn’t consider any modern Porsche “pretty,” at least not in the traditional sense. No, the problem here goes deeper. The problem I have isn’t really with the Panamera Wagon, or the way it looks… it’s with the people who would buy such a thing.

I understand the image you’re going for when you buy a Panamera five-door – first off, it’s a Porsche, so you know its fast, and with an MSRP that starts dangerously close to six-figures, it should be comfortable, too. Second, it’s a wagon, so it should be practical, with lots of space for people and things.

From track days to road trips, apexes to Home Depot runs, the Panamera Wagon should do it all. The problem is, it probably won’t.

Sure, the capability will be there, but the people who’ll buy this thing don’t really care about that. The selling point here is image, not reality. The idea that you could drive three hours to the racetrack, post a fast time, then pick up some lumber on the way home is far more important than actually, you know, doing it.

Still with me? Read on to see what I’m talking about.

Continue reading for the full story.

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