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Spy Shots: 2017 Porsche Cayman GT4 Caught Testing for the First Time

Spy Shots: 2017 Porsche Cayman GT4 Caught Testing for the First Time

Remember last week’s report claiming Porsche is working on a Cayman model that will slot above the already exciting GTS? The rumor surfaced only one month after the Cayman GTS was unveiled to the world, making it seem a bit suspicious, but it appears it wasn’t just tittle-tattle.

We’ve received confirmation for Motor Trend’s piece straight from our spy photographers stationed in Germany, who have captured the sports car while being driven on the country’s public roads.

Design-wise, the GT4 — the name has yet to be confirmed — isn’t astonishingly different when compared to the Cayman GTS, but some new elements are there to point out that we’re dealing with a completely new version. For starters, check out the cool wing mounted at the back, making this sports car the GT3 of the Cayman lineup.

Then there’s the revised front bumper. Although it carries styling cues seen on the GTS, the intakes are rather raw in appearance, lacking the beauty elements seen on the current range-topping model. Getting back to the car’s rear fascia, the wing isn’t the only addition. A new, protuberant spoiler has been attached between the taillights, reminding us of the 911 GT3 RS.

The engine that will be motivating the Cayman GT4 is a mystery, but it appears Porsche has already decided to go with a hybrid powertrain. It’s not clear whether the Germans will pair the electric motor with a four-cylinder or an inline-six engine, but the consensus is that the outcome will depend on the 919 Hybrid’s performance at the 24 Hours of Le Mans this summer.

Output is expected to sit around 400 horsepower, while pricing is rumored to be set at $125,000, a whooping $50,000 more than the Cayman GTS and only $5,000 below the 911 GT3. This may seem a little counterproductive for Porsche, considering it will outmatch the 911 Carrera S in nearly every measurable, but there is a plug-in hybrid version of the 911 in the works that is rumored to crank out over 700 ponies and the Turbo S with 560 ponies, giving buyers plenty of options to choose from in both the Cayman and 911 lineups without rendering the 911 obsolete.

Click past the jump to read more about the future Porsche Cayman GT4.

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2015 Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder

2015 Porsche Boxster Four-Cylinder

Well we know it is coming, but we finally have the first solid, rolling evidence of the new four-cylinder Porsche Boxster.

Our spy photographers have captured a new mule doing the rounds at the Nürburgring. While there are no visual cues that this taped up convertible is only running on four-cylinders, our spies report that the exhaust note was anything but the traditional flat-six wail the usually exits the rear of the Porsche.

While there have been some rumors that the upcoming four-banger Porsche may be using a more traditional in-line design engine than a flat-four setup, our spies were only able to catch it for two laps, so there was not enough listening time accurately gauge the engine note.

Beyond the engine note, this appears to be a fairly standard Porsche Boxster with some tape and sensors collecting loads of fancy data for the German engineers to salivate over.

If you ever really doubted all of Porsche’s plans to bring a four-cylinder car to market, this should finally put all those doubts to rest. We may even get shots of the new four-banger Cayman soon as well.

Expect to see a full announcement before the end of the year, with an on-sale date early in 2015.

Click past the jump for more photos of the new Porsche Boxster

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Spy Shots: 2015 Porsche GT3 RS Testing at Nurburgring

Spy Shots: 2015 Porsche GT3 RS Testing at Nurburgring

Did you catch yesterday’s spy shots of the upcoming Porsche 911 GT3 RS? We spotted the prototype on its way to the Nurburgring course, the place were all track-prepped Porsches feel at home, and we had a look at some of the car’s new details. Now we’re back to bring you a host of new photos with the GT3 RS taking on the famed Nordschleife. And if that makes you drool all over your keyboard, please take it to our paparazzi, because they’re the ones prowling around Nurburgring for the hottest four-wheeled machines that may show up.

Unfortunately, there are no fresh details for us to munch on, but the new pictures provide us with a better look at the prototype. We’re especially glad we can now ogle at the RS’ sexy rear end without any lens flare to bother our eyes and take notice of the bumper’s actual shape.

What’s more, the fact that the new 911 GT3 RS will have even wider tires at all four corners is much more obvious. Also, it appears that the large rear wing will undergo some minor modifications until it reaches its final production form.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche GT3 RS.

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Spy Shots: Porsche GT3 RS Goes for Another Testing Session

Spy Shots: Porsche GT3 RS Goes for Another Testing Session

With the new, lightning-fast Porsche 911 GT3 already on the streets - actually most of them are in the workshop for an engine replacement due to fire risk — it’s only natural for us petrol heads to be anxious for a new GT3 RS version to come out of Stuttgart.

Word has it the recent 911 GT3 fire debacle may have prompted the Germans to approach a slower, but safer development process, a decision that would make sense, but it appears that didn’t stop Porsche from taking the RS out for a new test session at the Nurburgring track.

Wearing very little camouflage, the prototype reveals the RS’ new aerodynamic body tweaks, which begin from the front bumper and go all the way back to the massive wing. A closer look at the revised front fascia shows the car sports a larger lip spoiler, with two canards mounted on the sides. These are actually new on the RS, having been offered only on the RS 4.0 version in the past.

The hood and the roof have also been reshaped, as were the fenders, which have been widened to house fatter wheels and tires. Around the back, the modified bumper is barely noticeable with the huge wing in sight. The unit is only slightly taller, but its new shape suggests it will provide even more grip.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Porsche GT3 RS.

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2016 Porsche 911 Speedster

2016 Porsche 911 Speedster

Traditionally, Porsche doesn’t release the 911 Speedster variant very often. With the last Speedster debuting at the 2010 Paris Motor Show (and selling out soon thereafter), it didn’t look like the Speedster would be coming back anytime soon. But late last year, rumors of a new 911 Speedster gained ground, specifically on how it would be packaged as a tribute to the classic 550 Spyder that Porsche built from 1953 to 1957. Now, it does look like the 911 Speedster is returning and will be built based on the current generation 911 and like its most recent predecessor, it will be a limited run model that will only be delivered to 550 lucky customers.

Whether Porsche is making the right move releasing a new 911 Speedster so close to the last one has become irrelevant at this point. Technology and innovation are moving at such a brisk pace that waiting decades for the new model to arrive doesn’t make sense anymore.

Add that to the popularity of the last one, and it only makes sense that with a new-generation 911 to build on, the return of the 911 Speedster is rightfully in the cards.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Porsche 911 Speedster.

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Video: Have a Listen to Porsche's Turbocharged Flat-4 Engine

Video: Have a Listen to Porsche’s Turbocharged Flat-4 Engine

The fact that Porsche is busy working on a turbocharged, four-cylinder powerplant that will find its way in the Boxter and Cayman is no longer a rumor. The Stuttgart crew confirmed it last month, stating that the company is doing so in order to join the eco-friendly trend the automotive industry has embarked on in the 21st century.

Little is known about the new four-pot at the time of this writing, but word from Porsche CEO Matthias Mueller says that the new unit will pump about 395 horsepower into the aforementioned sports cars. At the same time, the official suggested that the said four-cylinder engine won’t be sourced from the 919 Hybrid race car.

More details are likely to surface later this year, but until then there’s an interesting spy video that we’d like to share with you. At first glance it’s "only" about a facelifted version of the Porsche 911 lapping the Nurburgring, but the trick is to pump up the volume and put your ears to good use.

What you hear might very well be the new four-cylinder engine everyone’s been talking about lately. It appears that Porsche is already testing it, albeit in a 911. Don’t worry though, the Germans aren’t foolish enough to ruin their flagship sports car and take that brilliant flat-six away from it.

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Spy Shots: Facelift Porsche 911 Carrera S Caught Testing

Spy Shots: Facelift Porsche 911 Carrera S Caught Testing

You’re not seeing double – This is the second camo-covered 2015 Porsche 911 we’ve brought you today, though this one is the 911 Carrera S Cabriolet, instead of the 2016 911 Turbo. What this 911 does have is a reworked, more aggressive front fascia with more angular air inlets under the headlights. The turn signals appear to have the same design as the upcoming 911 Turbo S we caught testing, yet still similar to the current 911. And though it’s hard to tell from these new pictures, the previous set of spy shots show three bars lying horizontally across the inlets. Also very apparent on this test mule is the radar-based cruise control mounted in the center grille.

Out back, things look very similar to the 2015 911 Cabriolet we caught testing in January. Quad exhaust pipes protrude from the lower fascia, while what appears to be camouflage covers up the rear air extractors just aft of the rear wheels. The taillights are covered in the same transparent covering with the oval shapes to throw off any signs of reworked shapes underneath. Lastly, the engine bay louvers are hidden behind the same black metal mesh, protecting their appearance for a latter date.

Unlike in January, this test mule has its top down. The ragtop material is hidden nicely within the rear deck lid. Giving away its Carrera S status are the grey, 10-spoke, aluminum-faced wheels and round exhaust tips — providing Porsche keeps the same combinations currently found on the 2014 911.

It’s doubtful Porsche will change too much with the 911 Carrera S’ 3.8-liter powertrain. Naturally aspirated and making 400 horsepower and 440 pound-feet of torque, the current 911 Carrera S scoots to 62 mph in just 4.3 seconds. The possibility always exists for Porsche to increase the 3.8-liter’s outputs, however.

Click past the jump to read more about the facelift Porsche 911.

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Spy Shots: Revised Porsche 911 Turbo Hits the Roads of Europe

Spy Shots: Revised Porsche 911 Turbo Hits the Roads of Europe

This isn’t an April fools joke, but Porsche already seems focused on the next iteration of the 911 Cabriolet, despite the refreshed version just hitting the market for 2014. What you see here is a 911 Turbo S Cabriolet dressed in very light camo as it rolls down a sleepy European road. And because the new car smell has yet dispersed from the 2014 911, we’d expect Porsche to hold off until 2016 for another refresh, at the earliest.

The noticeable changes include reshaped turn signals up front, new rear heat extractor just aft of the rear tires, reworked taillights, and possibly revised styling on the louvered rear deck lid as evidenced by the metal grates covering them.

Those front turn signals look quite similar to the one found on the 911 we spotted cold-weather testing earlier this year. The shape is just different enough from the current model to be new, yet it still holds that iconic 911 look. Around back seems to be the most heavily modified. It’s hard to tell from these shots, but it appears the heat extractor just behind the rear wheels have been reworked. Instead of the large grille of the current model, these seem to just be slats in the bumper. However, the slats could just be a clever camouflage of the vents underneath.

The taillights look revised as well. Just like the front turn signals, they are covered in a transparent film with oval shapes to break up any discernible pattern underneath. The way the taillights meet the bumper may also be revised since it’s covered in tape. Lastly, metal grates camouflage the louvers over the engine bay. It appears the louvers have been turned to face outward rather than rearward as before.

Click past the jump for more info on the spied 2016 Porsche 911 Turbo S Cabriolet

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Spy Shots: 2015 Porsche Cayenne Reveals its New Face

Spy Shots: 2015 Porsche Cayenne Reveals its New Face

The wintery winds of change are blowing the covers off the newly restyled 2015 Porsche Cayenne as our spy photographers captured this unmasked example of Porsche’s latest redesign. From the looks of things, the changes are minor with the majority of updates relegated to the front turn signals, fog lights, and center grille.

For starters, the center grille is more rectangular than last year’s gaping mouth, and the side air inlets decrease in size to match the grille. The turn signals within those air inlets have been pushed upward into the bodywork, removing their free-floating appearance from 2013. The cruise control radar is also repositioned to the grille’s center, down from the 12 o’clock position in last year’s grille. Perched just above the radar looks to be a front view camera. The fog lights now stick out further with less bodywork around them.

Interestingly, the headlights almost look like stickers off a NASCAR Sprint Cup car. Perhaps the HIDs weren’t ready for real-world testing yet. Speaking of lights, turn signal repeaters now reside on the side mirrors, doubling the ones on the front fender. Besides the reshaped mirror, the side profile of the SUV — the doors and rear quarter panels — appears unchanged. Though not in these photos, we expect the taillights to get a similar 3D-like appearance resembling the Macan.

At this point, not much is know about potential powertrains for the 2015 Cayenne. Rumors swirl about Porsche offering a plug-in hybrid version, but nothing solid has been nailed down. Expect the diesel and gas variants to return with some possible tweaks to increase fuel efficiency and power outputs.

Click past the jump for more photos and info on the 2015 Cayenne

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Spy Shots: Facelifted Porsche 911 GTS or Speedster Caught Testing

Spy shots of the facelifted Porsche 911 were sent to us by our trusty spy photographer, although this time something about the prototype caught our attention that could point to a different, and potentially more powerful 911. Take a closer look at these photos and you might notice that instead of the quad exhausts of the 2015 911, this particular model is sporting a pair of center-mounted exhaust pipes, similar to the setup used on the 2014 911 GT3.

So what could this interesting little nugget mean? Our best guess is a revival of the GTS, something we haven’t seen from the 911 since the 2011 Carrera GTS arrived in the scene back in 2010.

Another potential model is the 911 Speedster, and the bulging rear end — a little more so than the standard 911 Convertible at least — could be a clue that points in that direction. The canvas roof and the windshield looks unchanged though, and if this is the Speedster, it’s probably an early prototype that will undergo some changes before a production model rolls out.

Either way, what we’re looking at here is a new trim of the 911 that we haven’t seen in quite a while. Our hunch is that this is the 911 GTS, and if it is, it’s definitely a welcome addition to the already growing 911 family.

Let us know in the comments what you think this model is.

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Porsche Claims There is No 911 Turbo Targa, but we Rendered it Anyways

Porsche Claims There is No 911 Turbo Targa, but we Rendered it Anyways

Buzzkill alert, folks...

It looks as if the report that Porsche would reveal the 911 Turbo Targa was not true. AutoBlog had a conversation with Nick Twork, Porsche North America Product Communication Manager, about the report, and he said that the report is "Totally False."

Turns out that all we’ll see at Geneva is Porsche’s new 919 Hybrid and 911 RSR race cars. Sure those are both really cool, but nowhere near as awesome as a Targa variant of the 911 Turbo.

Despite the report that Porsche will not release this heap of turbocharged, roofless hotness, we still think that one will eventually make its way onto the market. With that said, we present to you the TopSpeed rendering of the 911 Turbo Targa, courtesy of our rendering extraordinaire, Pratyush Rout.

Creating the rendering wasn’t too hard, as we simply took the 911 Targa, and added in the typical Turbo design cues, including the wider hips, rear air intakes, and a few other tasty bits. This gives the 911 Targa the bad-ass look it deserves, so we can only hope that Porsche decides to release it in the near future.

Click past the jump to read why I think Porsche should/shouldn’t release the 911 Turbo Targa and a little about the existing 911 Targa.

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2015 Porsche 911 Targa Turbo

2015 Porsche 911 Targa Turbo

The 911 Targa came, and we loved what we saw. With 350 horsepower and 287 pound-feet of torque in tow, however, there was lots of room to grow. According to sources in the know, the 911 Targa Turbo will make its debut at the 2014 Geneva Auto Show.

This means that the removable-top sports car is primed to receive a 520-horsepower, 3.8-liter flat-six engine, and may even hit 360 horsepower if Porsche gives the Targa treatment to the Turbo S model. Now this is what we have been waiting for!

There is no confirmation of the 911 Targa Turbo , but according to Jalopnik, the source reporting this news is quite reliable. We’ll keep an eye on the 911 Targa Turbo , and pass more information on once we get some more in-depth information.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Targa Turbo and about the current 911 Targa.

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