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Renault Alaskan

2017 Renault Alaskan

2017 Renault Alaskan
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Could this be the next Nissan Frontier?

Nissan’s business partner, Renault, just debuted the production version of the Alaskan pickup. This comes a year after Renault teased us with the Alaskan Concept – a vehicle that certainly can be seen lurking in the Alaskan’s bodylines. Underneath, the Alaskan is based on the Nissan Navara NP300 pickup. This gives us a glimpse at what Nissan may have in store for the next U.S.-spec Frontier pickup. Speculation aside, the Alaskan is Renault’s first light duty pickup ever, making it a historic debut and rounding out Renault’s extensive line of commercial heavy vehicles.

The Alaskan is advertised as a “one-tonne” pickup, meaning it can haul a metric tonne of weight in its bed. In U.S. terms, that’s 1.1 tons, or 2,205 pounds. That’s impressive considering the maximum payload for the 2016 Ford F-150 is 2,320 pounds. By comparison, the Chevrolet Colorado can only haul 1,630 pounds. The Alaskan’s max tow rating is 7,716 pounds, falling in line with the Colorado but coming short of the F-150’s max tow rating of more than 10,000 pounds.

The Alaskan does this with a fully boxed steel frame, a five-link rear suspension, and a 2.3-liter twin-turbocharged four-cylinder. That five-link rear suspension reminds us of Ram’s choice to ditch the old-school leaf springs. Renault’s press materials spurt some of the same benefits listed by Ram, including a smoother ride with less noise and vibrations. Single cab versions of the Alaskan still stick with the leaf spring design, however.

The Alaskan will be built in Cuernavaca, Mexico; Barcelona, Spain; and Cordoba, Argentina. Sales will begin in Columbia, but will spread to several markets worldwide.

Continue reading for more information.

 

Latest Renault Alaskan news and reviews:

2017 Renault Alaskan

2017 Renault Alaskan

Could this be the next Nissan Frontier?

Nissan’s business partner, Renault, just debuted the production version of the Alaskan pickup. This comes a year after Renault teased us with the Alaskan Concept – a vehicle that certainly can be seen lurking in the Alaskan’s bodylines. Underneath, the Alaskan is based on the Nissan Navara NP300 pickup. This gives us a glimpse at what Nissan may have in store for the next U.S.-spec Frontier pickup. Speculation aside, the Alaskan is Renault’s first light duty pickup ever, making it a historic debut and rounding out Renault’s extensive line of commercial heavy vehicles.

The Alaskan is advertised as a “one-tonne” pickup, meaning it can haul a metric tonne of weight in its bed. In U.S. terms, that’s 1.1 tons, or 2,205 pounds. That’s impressive considering the maximum payload for the 2016 Ford F-150 is 2,320 pounds. By comparison, the Chevrolet Colorado can only haul 1,630 pounds. The Alaskan’s max tow rating is 7,716 pounds, falling in line with the Colorado but coming short of the F-150’s max tow rating of more than 10,000 pounds.

The Alaskan does this with a fully boxed steel frame, a five-link rear suspension, and a 2.3-liter twin-turbocharged four-cylinder. That five-link rear suspension reminds us of Ram’s choice to ditch the old-school leaf springs. Renault’s press materials spurt some of the same benefits listed by Ram, including a smoother ride with less noise and vibrations. Single cab versions of the Alaskan still stick with the leaf spring design, however.

The Alaskan will be built in Cuernavaca, Mexico; Barcelona, Spain; and Cordoba, Argentina. Sales will begin in Columbia, but will spread to several markets worldwide.

Continue reading for more information.

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