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Ferrari's One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

Ferrari’s One-Off Creations is A List of the Most Desirable Prancing Horses of All Time

It literally can’t get any better than a one-off

Back in 2008, Ferrari launched its One-Off personalization program to a lot of fanfare at that year’s Geneva Motor Show. The goal was to give Maranello’s most important clients the opportunity to create their own Ferraris. It’s been over a decade since that announcement, and it’s safe to say that Ferrari’s program has become a resounding success. Every year, a number of one-off Ferraris enter our lives, commissioned by an individual who Ferrari deems as one of its VIPs. Models like the 2012 Ferrari SP Arya, 2014 Ferrari SP FFX, and 2018 Ferrari SP38 Deborah have been built. Each of these one-offs is unique from every other Ferrari in existence, largely because they came to life as a result of someone’s vision for his or her perfect Ferrari. The 2019 Ferrari P80/C is the latest one-off Ferrari to arrive, but given the success Ferrari has had with the program and the growing demand among customers to get their own “1of1s” — there’s a five-year waitlist, in case you qualify — the P80/C won’t be the last one-off Ferrari in the world. On the contrary, this first ten years of the whole program could be just the beginning of what will most likely turn into one of Ferrari’s most successful customer-centric programs in its long and illustrious history. In case you haven’t paid attention over the last ten years, check out some of the most memorable one-off models that Ferrari has created.

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The Best (and Fastest) Supercars of the 90s

The Best (and Fastest) Supercars of the 90s

Most of these supercars took up residence on the walls of a lot of people’s bedrooms

The 1990s were an interesting decade for the auto industry, though most of us remember it more because of what took place in the supercar segment. Back then, the “term” supercar wasn’t as widely used as it is today, but that didn’t stop automakers like Ferrari, Lamborghini, Porsche, Mercedes, and, yes, McLaren from developing performance beasts that didn’t rely on driving aids to be considered super. For the most part, the 1990s supercars were machines that came with insanely powerful engines, sleek and functional bodies, and low curb weights. Traction control? KERS? Launch control? None of these existed in that era, and, in some ways, that’s what made those exotics so pure and completely awesome. There’s a long list of supercars that shot to fame in the 1990s. We could’ve identified all of them, but that would’ve taken up a lot of space and time. Instead, we chose eight of the best and fastest supercars of that decade that have evolved into unicorns in today’s era of supercars.

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How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

How Much Does a Ferrari Cost?

None of these models come cheap, in case you didn’t know

It’s no secret that Ferraris are expensive. They’re often considered rolling works of art more than they’re thought of as automobiles. That kind of stature affords Ferrari the space to ask for premium prices for its models. Of course, legacy has something to do with it, too. There’s a reason, after all, that the most expensive car ever sold — it fetched for almost $50 million — is a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. Thankfully, you don’t have to pay that much to buy a brand-new Ferrari these days, but don’t expect to score one for anything less than $200,000, either. Like most exotic manufacturers, Ferrari charges a premium for its vehicles because these cars are developed with the most advanced technologies in the industry. They’re not just museum-grade pieces; they’re also fast, powerful, and loaded with all the latest tech you can find in the business. Plus, there’s cache that comes with wearing the iconic Prancing Horse badge. So if you’re thinking of buying a Ferrari as your next car purchase, do so with the full understanding that you’re going to have to break the bank to afford one.

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How Fast Can a Lamborghini Go?

How Fast Can a Lamborghini Go?

It depends a lot on the Lamborghini, but it’s usually very fast

Lamborghini made its first step on the long catwalk of the automotive world back in 1963, when, during the Turin Motor Show, Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini unveiled the 350 GTV concept. The next year, Lamborghini perfected the road-going 350 GT, which was followed shortly after by the 400 GT. But the bases of Lamborghini had been established in 1962 when Ferruccio Lamborghini bought a plot of land in Sant’Agata Bolognese with the aim to build an “ultramodern” car factory.

It was Ferruccio who started the tradition of naming his car after breeds of fighting bulls, and it was also him who inspired its engineers, designers, and mechanics to come up with cars such as the Miura, Espada, Islero, and more recently, Diablo, Countach, Gallardo, Murcielago, Huracan, and Aventador. As of late, Sant’Agata Bolognese joined the SUV craze with the Urus, which also opened a new niche, that of Super-SUVs.

So, to come back to the main topic at hand here, how fast can a Lamborghini go? To answer that, we’re going to look at some of the brand’s most prominent models, including the said Urus SUV, since it has become a sales sensation of sorts.

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2020 Bugatti Centodieci Quirks and Features

2020 Bugatti Centodieci Quirks and Features

Bugatti Centodieci was designed in six months thanks entirely to a new design method that does not require building a clay model

After the no-compromise racing machine called Divo and the ultimate expression of exclusivity known as the La Voiture Noire, Bugatti revealed yet another special vehicle - the Centodieci. Crafted to catch the imagination of the most enthusiastic Bugatti connoisseur, the Centodieci comes to match the uncompromised performance of the Divo, with style reminiscent of the well-known Bugatti from the nineties - the EB110. Not only did Bugatti imagine the car to celebrate the 110th anniversary of the company, but it also walked a path that honors a supercar that was at the pinnacle of car design in the nineties. These are cool facts and features you simply have to know about the Bugatti Centodieci.

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5 Modern Sports Cars You've Probably Never Heard Of

5 Modern Sports Cars You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

It’s quite extraordinary to see so many small supercar and sportscar producers coming up and trying to take the cake from the limited, but money-endowed niche of a market. Only a handful actually do survive long enough to create a customer base (Pagani or Koenigsegg,) to induce some kind of hype and attract funding (Rimac,) or just be talked about (Lykan, Hennessey, or even Zenvo.) It seems that the new supercar producers are springing up like mushrooms (and they go away as easily,) even more so than sports car producers. In that regard, I managed to find five interesting sports cars you have probably never heard of. All of them do try (or have tried) to evoke some sort of evolution in this highly limited market.

The end goal is similar for all - to sell as many cars as possible and become profitable. Enter the world of the incredible, courageous, and sometimes rather innovative pieces of automotive royalty you’ve never heard of.

I am starting with a car from Slovenia, partly designed by a race car driver.

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10 Things a BMW M Hypercar Needs to Corner the Market

10 Things a BMW M Hypercar Needs to Corner the Market

BMW M Is Working On A Supercar, But What About The Hypercar?

One of the best ways to showcase your technical expertise and convince buyers to buy your cars is to build a hypercar. Mercedes-AMG did it, Aston Martin too. Heck, Volkswagen AG has the best of them all - the Bugatti Veyron and the Chiron. I can only imagine that somewhere in BMW headquarters in Munchen, the board of directors and investors sat together and discussed the hypercar idea.

After all, back in 2017, when Mercedes-AMG showcased the F1 inspired Project One, BMW M boss Dirk Hacker said:

“We would like to do a standalone car, and we could do it – but today there is no requirement from the market to do it. As a company, we are more focused on future mobility than digitization than building a hypercar, to be honest, but if we came to the decision to do a super sports car, then we could do that.”

Apparently, the market still isn’t favorable for the development of the BMW hypercar, but that does not stop us from the brainstorming of what that proposed hypercar could be. I am giving you ten different things BMW hypercar needs to succeed.

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2020 De Tomaso P72 versus 2005 SCG P4/5

2020 De Tomaso P72 versus 2005 SCG P4/5

Glickenhaus calls copycat on new De Tomaso P72’s design

Jaws dropped at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed when the De Tomaso P72 was revealed to the public. Its intoxicating mix of retro design cues, modern interpretation, and opulent presentation made it an instant hit. The car previews a planned series of 72 examples set to grace the garages of wealthy collectors, but while most who have laid eyes on it have instantly fallen in love, there is one person who has less than flattering things to say about it.

James Glickenhaust is known for his role in the film industry, but also as an automotive entrepreneur and owner of American boutique car maker Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus (SCG). In 2005, he commissioned the creation of a Ferrari Enzo-based car called the P4/5 that was initially supposed to bear the SCG badge, but upon seeing it, Ferrari chairman at the time, Luca di Montezemolo decided that the Pininfarina-designed one-off should bear the Prancing Horse badge instead.

Glickenhaus recently accused De Tomaso of blatantly ripping off the P4/5’s design, combining it with that of the iconic 1967 Ferrari 330 P3/4 (which in turn also previously inspired the Glickenhaus car), and rehashing it for the P72. We can definitely see where he’s coming from, but at the same time, there are plenty of differences in the design, and, overall, the two cars feel different and they feel like they have different philosophies behind them. In fact, they do, because the P4/5 was conceived as a single example never to be replicated, while the P72 is intended for limited series production, and it’s also considerably more opulent looking - by contrast, the P4/5 looks spartan and racecar-like.

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Opinion: The Lotus Evija is a Big Mistake for the Brand

Opinion: The Lotus Evija is a Big Mistake for the Brand

You can’t just jump in the ring with Ali because you think you can box

The Lotus Evija, a £1.7 million ($2.1 million at current exchange rates) all-electric hypercar, has just been announced, and I’m already wondering just WTF Lotus is thinking. Sure, it probably has a lot to do with Geely backing the brand now – Lotus actually has some money to play with – but we’re talking about a brand that has been selling $50,000 - $120,000 cars for years. We’re talking about a company that posted its first self-proclaimed profit in years back in August of 2017. And, we’re talking about a company that hasn’t presented an all-new car in more than a decade (hello Lotus Evora) and has managed to soldier on by building random and slightly more potent versions of existing cars. Yet, here we are looking at a $2 million Lotus. This just doesn’t seem like the right move, and I have good reason why.

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2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed: Top Six New Car Premieres

2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed: Top Six New Car Premieres

The Goodwood Festival of Speed has plenty of new metal; here’s our premiere picks

What’s really great about the Goodwood Festival of Speed, especially in recent years, is that it not only assembles cars from all eras of motoring but that it also plays host to several debuts. More and more automakers have chosen the Festival as the venue of choice to reveal (usually sporty) new cars in order to gauge the opinion of the public.

The crowd at Goodwood is arguably more discerning too, since probably more people who attend this event are connoisseurs and/or enthusiasts than those who attend traditional motor shows. And, if a manufacturer chooses to present a new model here, it needs to be aware that its new metal will probably be in the very close proximity to priceless classics or flashy modern exotics.

With that being said, I’ve gathered a list of the top six most important new cars shown to the public for the first time at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed. The list contains three hot hatches and three supercars, one of which is actually a track-only special that attracted quite a bit of attention at the event.

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2020 Ford GT Mk II Quirks and Facts

2020 Ford GT Mk II Quirks and Facts

The Most Hardcore Ford GT Can Pull More Gs In The Corner Than The Koenigsegg One:1

Revealed as a sort of a swan song for the latest generation of the Ford GT family, the newest Ford GT Mk II track edition is the most extreme representation of the ethos created out of sheer necessity for speed. Revealed at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed Hillclimb where it won the Supercar Shootout class by running up the hill in 52.04 seconds, the Ford GT Mk II brings several specific track virtues unknown to its road-going brother.

This Ford GT does not adhere to any rule; it does not look to compete with any established competitors, but it will be faster than any of them. Developed in conjunction with Ford’s race partner Multimatic, the Ford GT Mk II Track Edition is probably the most extreme evolution of this very car we will ever see. This is what you need to know about it.

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Rules of Owning a Ford GT

Rules of Owning a Ford GT

If You Have Or Want To Get The Ford GT You Need To Follow These Rules

More than 6,500 people applied for the new Ford GT when Ford released its application program back in 2016. An unprecedented demand sparked a bit of chaos within Ford who allocated only 1,000 units for production. In 2018, Ford extended the production to add 350 units for a total production output of the new Ford GT of 1,350 units. Of course, the company will produce all the cars over a number of years, and you can expect the 1350th unit not to leave the production facility until 2022. As this is an exclusive halo supercar, with Le Mans racer inspired technology, and some serious track capability, Ford had to create some rather incredible rules that owners have to follow.

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5 Modern Supercars You've Probably Never Heard Of

5 Modern Supercars You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

Five supercars, with a total power output of 5.415 horsepower, are here. I am sure that you simply do not know enough about them. Modern supercars and hypercars you have probably never heard of are quite numerous actually. Apart from these, I could have also listed the Rezvani Beast, the Trion Nemesis RR, the Apollo Arrow, the Arash AF10, the Devel Sixteen, and the Arrinera Hussarya, among others. But what is the point as many of these will simply cease to exist as time plays its dirty game and erases them from history. Yet, the five I chose may stick around a bit longer than expected.

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Ferrari SF90 Stradale vs McLaren Speedtail

Ferrari SF90 Stradale vs McLaren Speedtail

The battle of the hybrid titans

Back in 2013, we had an interesting hybrid supercar war going on between Ferrari and McLaren. Both companies launched their first hybrids at the Geneva Motor Show, and both supercars were incredibly powerful and fast. Enthusiasts and journalists were comparing them all over the place, and head-on drag race videos were getting billions of views. Everyone wanted to know which supercar was quicker. Six years later and McLaren has a new hybrid to brag about. It’s called the Speedtail, and it’s notably different than the P1. Likewise, Ferrari launched the SF90 Stradale, its second hybrid after the LaFerrari. As you might have already guessed, we’re going to compare the two in all major departments.

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