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2020 Tesla Model 3 Performance by R-Zentric

2020 Tesla Model 3 Performance by R-Zentric

The tuner’s aero kit for the Model 3 makes it track-worthy and adds points for its looks

Have you ever wondered how the aftermarket tuning works for EVs? You don’t have much stuff in the powertrain that you can play around with. These machines are so different that a power boost can be done via an over-the-air update. There aren’t a lot of companies who have worked on electric cars yet.

However, a company called RevoZport, has laid its hands on the Tesla Model 3 Performance and experimented with what can be done. The result is an electric car with supercar-like aerodynamics that makes it a hoot-and-a-half to drive. Not to mention, it also looks sporty with those body kits. Do you think aerodynamics will play a big part in customizing an electric car for performance?

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2021 Tesla Cybertruck

2021 Tesla Cybertruck

Tesla is entering the pickup truck game with a revolutionary hauler

The 2021 Cybertruck is the first pickup truck built by Tesla and is the oddest-looking pickup truck to ever hit the market. Unveiled at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show, the 2022 Cybertruck will go into production in 2021. As one of the first production electric trucks, the Cybertruck is also one of the most advanced utility vehicles ever built. Much like it did with the Model X and Model 3, Tesla didn’t unveil a lot of details during the launch event, so the 2021 Cybertruck still hides mysteries. But let’s have a closer look at what we already know about it in the review below.

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2022 Tesla Model S

2022 Tesla Model S

Creating a worthy successor to an EV icon

The Model S is far and away Tesla’s most popular vehicle, known for singlehandedly shifting public opinion of EVs from dowdy, boring people-movers, to sexy, high-tech performance machines. This is the model that set the stage for all of Tesla’s other offerings, including the top-shelf Model X SUV, and more recently, the affordable Model 3 compact four-door. However, the Model S was first introduced in 2012, which means it’s starting to get a little long in the tooth, and a second-gen for the full-/mid-size luxury sedan should be headed down the line in the next few years. As such, we put on our speculation hats and got down to reasoning out what the next Model S might bring to the table.

Update 9/12/2019: The Tesla Model S 100D + Plaid was spotted going through the paces on the Nurburgring today in preparation for a new record attempt to dethrone the Porsche Taycan. Check out our special spy shots section below to see the first images and learn more about what could represent the next significant update to the Tesla Model S.

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2018 Tesla Model 3

2018 Tesla Model 3

Tesla’s first electric car for the masses

Say what you will about Tesla – the company’s ambition is undeniable. Founded in 2003, the California-based electric carmaker set out with the goal of overturning the auto industry status quo and hastening “the world’s transition to sustainable energy.” To that end, Tesla’s latest play (and arguably its more important) is called the Model 3. Framed as a more affordable alternative to the highly successful Model S full-size sedan and Model X SUV, there’s no shortage of excitement behind the more compact 3, and now, after countless rumors and practically unending speculation, the veil has been lifted. Following a massive live streaming event celebrating the handover of the first Model 3’s off the production line, it was revealed that buyers get two trim levels to pick from, with as much as 310 miles per charge and a 0-to-60 mph time of 5.1 seconds for the range-topper.

But, as you might expect, there’s a whole lotta footnotes that go along with the above-mentioned specs. For starters, actually getting a Model 3 into your driveway is no simple endeavor. Following a brief pre-production reveal in April of 2016, an estimated 400,000 people plunked down $1,000 for a pre-order, and that means if you don’t have a spot in line, it’s gonna be a while. Then there’s the list of ultra-pricey extras that add significant weight to the bottom line. Simply put, the question remains – does the Model 3 live up to the hype? Read on to find out.

Updated 08/23/2017: We added a series of new images taken during the 2017 Monterey Car Week.

Continue reading to learn more about the Tesla Model 3.

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2020 Tesla Model Y

2020 Tesla Model Y

The model that will complete the S3XY line up

Were you on the market for a Tesla Model X only to realize that its big size made it cumbersome and its falcon doors weren’t really your cup of tea? Now, Tesla’s offering you the smaller, cheaper, and less flamboyant Model Y. The upcoming cheapest version starts at just $39,000 which is cheaper than your run-of-the-mill Lexus IS 300 and more than 50% off the price of a Model X. The battery package is that on the Model 3 Performance and you’ll be able to go between 230 and 300 miles on one charge depending on the version you choose. As it’s a Tesla, you can be sure it will be spirited, to say the least, and, as with Musk’s other creations, it caught mass manufacturers almost unprepared.

The Tesla Model Y is Tesla’s second volume model, part of the ’tier 3’ lineup alongside the Model 3 compact sedan. It was unveiled on March 14th during what Kirby called a "presentation bereft of all the razzle-dazzle that has become synonymous" with Tesla. This, he argued, is a sign that Tesla itself is becoming a normal, volume manufacturer, moving away from its boutique image it had maintained with the Model S and the Model X that created far more buzz upon release. Still, the event was so lackluster we could condense it all in a four-minute-long video with ease.

This doesn’t mean the Model Y has to be overlooked - quite the opposite. The Model Y has to be a hit bigger than the Model 3 is for Tesla to go on with its plans that include a full-size semi, that could be seen during the Model Y’s presentation, a pick-up truck, and the new Roadster among others. It’s obviously got to do with what Tesla’s rivals do - after all, the cheapest ’Standard’ version won’t begin shipping until 2021 - but Tesla still has the edge on everybody with its mid-size crossover.

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2020 Tesla City Car

2020 Tesla City Car

The most affordable (and adorable) Tesla yet

Before you start blasting away in the comments section, hear me out, because a Tesla City Car isn’t as crazy as you might think. There’s a reason the California-based automaker started with the ultra-pricey Roadster, Model S, and Model X – the plan is to use the profits from those high-end autos to fund more accessible offerings (you know, like the Model 3). And considering Tesla has stated time and again that its ultimate goal is to bring electric transportation to everyone, the only logical thing to do is to spray a bit of the Musk on a city car, the affordable option when it comes to personal urban transport.

So far, Tesla’s top-down strategy has worked wonders, and depending on how the company handles production of the Model 3, more products are almost certainly just over the horizon. What’s more, a Tesla city car would be the perfect solution for urban dwellers looking for a four-wheeled addition to their laptop-and-coffee-shop lifestyle.

So we drew up a rendering, imagined we were in Palo Alto, and came up with the following speculative review.

Continue reading to learn more about the future Tesla City Car.

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2019 Tesla Minivan

2019 Tesla Minivan

The family friendly Tesla?

Tesla’s “Master Plan, Part Deux” includes a wide range of future vehicles, including a pickup, a compact SUV, and even a semi-truck. Sadly however, Tesla might be missing an important segment niche – the minivan. Sure, sales of minivans have dwindled with the exploding popularity of the crossover, but families continue to rely on the minivan’s unparalleled interior volume and downright handiness for hauling the kids and their stuff.

With that in mind, we decided to render what a Tesla minivan might look like. However unlikely, the idea is an interesting one. Think about it – interior volume would be nearly unimpeded thanks to the battery pack being incased in the flat floor with relatively compact electric motors at either end. Its “frunk” gives space to store items separate from the passenger cabin. And there would be no more smelly, greasy gas pumps to operate. Sounds great, right mom?

A similar chassis as the Model X SUV would likely underpin Tesla’s version of a minivan. Perhaps the wheelbase would be slightly stretched to accommodate for a larger third row and the inevitable sliding rear doors. Maybe Tesla engineers would develop some sort of hidden track system for those doors, eliminating the unsightly gap in the rear quarter panels. The potential for innovation is boundless.

Let’s check out the details below.

Continue reading to learn more about the Tesla Minivan.

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