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2017 Tesla Model S

2017 Tesla Model S

The Model S gets a nose job to freshen things up a bit

Tesla discontinued the Roadster, and in quick succession, released its new Model S. Since then, the Model S has become widely popular and sales were good enough that Tesla has extended its offering of vehicles, now including the Model X and the soon-to-be-released Tesla Model 3. At first, the Model S sedan came only in rear-wheel drive and featured an extended range 265 miles. Not that it wasn’t a bad initial package – Tesla did effective set the standard for all-electric vehicles, and to date, it’s still the best all-electric model you can get.

Over the past few years, the Model S has seen several updates, including a new front motor that made all-wheel-drive variants available, plus Autopilot, and Ludicrous mode. In that time frame, the range has also been increased up to 295 miles for properly equipped models. The one thing that hasn’t changed since the car’s introduction, however, is the body style. But now as we approach the 2017 model year, Tesla has finally given the Model S a facelift.

Before you get to overwhelmed with excitement, be warned that the facelift is pretty minor. It was well needed, though, and the front end does sport a new look. Join me for an in-depth look at the Tesla Model S and what it brings to the table as Tesla ushers in the 2017 model year.

Update 06/09/2016: Tesla has announced that it is taking a step backward and offering a more affordable version of the Model S in 60 and 60D form. Check out the updates in our Drivetrain and Prices sections below for all the details.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2017 Tesla Model S.

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2015 Tesla Model S 70D

2015 Tesla Model S 70D

First launched for the 2012 model year, the Tesla Model S has gone through countless updates, ranging from minor over-the-air tweaks to huge powertrain updates. Despite these updates, there are two things that have remained consistent with the Model S, and those are its timeless looks and its status as a revolutionary model that’s trying to change the world’s view on electric vehicles. In late 2014, Tesla introduced a significant overhaul that marked the introduction of the “D,” which has a dual-motor all-wheel-drive system. For 2015, Tesla is introducing the new entry-level Model S 70D that replaces the old 60 kWh model.

This Model S 70D marks another key change for the Model S lineup, as it is the end of the line for rear-wheel-drive in the Model S. Like the elimination of the underpowered and shot-ranged 40 kWh model during the 2013 model year, and the introduction of the “D” in 2014, this is a natural move for the automaker. However, with the electric vehicle still in the toddler phase, is the market ready for this model?

Continue reading my full review to find out what I think of the Model S 70D.

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2015 Tesla Roadster 3.0

2015 Tesla Roadster 3.0

Introduced back in 2008, the Roadster was Tesla’s first-ever production vehicle and the first car to become a rolling ambassador for the brand, so it is only natural that the Californian company has nothing but love for it. Essentially, the car is a thoroughly modified Lotus Elise that has been converted to run exclusively on electricity, thus also making it the first-ever electric sports car that was produced in a significant number. In total, around 2,600 units were manufactured, with production ending back in 2012. As we enter the 2015 model year, there is not a new Roadster coming, but instead an update to the older models that extends its EV range.

Its 4-pole AC induction motor was reworked in the Roadster S version to give the car a naught-to-60-mph acceleration of just 3.7 seconds, not exactly bad numbers considering its EPA range of 244 miles. With the "3.0 package," Tesla reckons that its range will increase by a predicted 40 to 50 percent in ideal conditions, and it will try to put its money where its mouth is by taking an updated Roadster over 400 miles in a non-stop drive from San Francisco to Los Angeles in the beginning of 2015. According to the company, a new battery pack needs to finish a safety validation before appointments for upgrading Roadsters will commence sometime in the Spring of 2015, when all owners can receive the new modifications that will enhance their range.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Tesla Roadster 3.0.

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2015 Tesla Model S

2015 Tesla Model S

Tesla Motors introduced the Model S sedan for the 2012 model year, a few months after discontinuing its very first model, the Roadster. The all-electric sedan was met with huge enthusiasm, mostly due to its impressive performance figures and extended range, which reached up to 265 miles per charge. The Model S came with three battery pack options that delivered up to 470 horsepower and performance figures that rivaled those of high-performance, gasoline-powered sedans. The Model S received only software and safety updates through the 2014 model year, but that all changes with the 2015 model year. For 2015, the California-based automaker rolled out the first extensive upgrade for the EV’s drivetrain, consisting of an additional electric motor that enables the Model S to become an all-wheel-drive vehicle with mind-bending performance numbers.

The update does not replace the RWD sedan, but adds three new models to the lineup. Highlighted by the use of "D" on their trunks, the AWD Model S’ bring enhanced performance and range into Tesla dealerships. Much-needed convenience and safety features are also offered for 2015, but everything comes at a price. Read on to find out more about the improvements Tesla has introduced for 2015.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2015 Tesla Model S.

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