The numbers don’t lie

We’re not sure if you’ve noticed, but things have been getting a little out of hand lately. In the never-ending quest to one-up the competition, automakers have unleashed some truly astounding machines upon the world, each packed to the brim with jaw-dropping stats. The numbers these things bring to the table are simply ridiculous – outrageous power, mind-warping speed, and otherworldly performance potential. Any one of these rides will permanently alter your perception of what it means to go fast, even if all you do is digest the numbers. As such, we’ve listed here our top five favorite street cars with simply ridiculous spec sheets.

Obviously, super cars make up the majority of the entries, but we’ve also got the king of the muscle cars and even an all-electric icon on the list as well. Each entry is fully capable of melting face in its own special way, and each serves as a reminder that we are indeed living in a special time. Enthusiasts, say hello to the ultimate bench racers, the four-wheeled monsters bringing the hottest of the heat. Which would you have? Let us know in the comments section below, or post up your pick for the car with the most ridiculous spec sheet.

Continue reading to learn more about TopSpeed’s Top 5 Cars With Ridiculous Spec Sheets.

Dodge Challenger SRT Demon

2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon High Resolution Exterior
- image 713149
The Demon can hit the 60-mph mark in just 2.3 seconds, while rampaging on to a quarter mile time of 9.65 seconds at a blistering 140 mph

When Dodge unveiled the Challenger SRT Hellcat back in 2015, the motoring world at large was blown away. Here was a domestic automaker offering a 700-horsepower, 200-mph, RWD muscle car for less than $65,000. Prior to the bad cat, that much performance for such little outlay was simply unheard of. But of course, nothing exceeds like excess, so as a follow-up, Dodge created something even more over-the-top – the Challenger SRT Demon.

Like the Hellcat, the Demon equips a supercharged 6.2-liter Hemi V-8 powerplant, but if you fill the gas tank with race fuel, output jumps to 840 horsepower and 808 pound-feet of torque, versus the Hellcat’s 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque. Making all those ponies is 14.5 psi of boost, which pulls in air from the largest functional hood scoop ever fitted to a production vehicle.

Properly applied, the Demon can hit the 60-mph mark in just 2.3 seconds, while rampaging on to a quarter mile time of 9.65 seconds at a blistering 140 mph. Those kinds of numbers are usually reserved for dedicated race cars, but the Demon manages thanks in part to absurd grip from the rear-mounted Nitto drag slicks, which offer as much as 1.8’s of forward acceleration off the line. Just get the rubber nice and toasty with the standard trans brake, stage up, wait for the green, then foot down and hold on.

Read the full review here.

Bugatti Chiron

2018 Bugatti Chiron High Resolution Exterior
- image 667477
The Chiron manages a run to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds, 120 mph in 6.5 seconds, and 190 mph in 13.6 second

Like the Demon, the Chiron is a follow-up to a previous success, more specifically, the Veyron. Originally unveiled in a series of concepts in the late ‘90s, the production Veyron hit the market in 2005, and the world of super cars hasn’t been the same since. The specs are completely bonkers, even by today’s standards – making it go is an 8.0-liter W-16 engine stuffed with atmosphere from no less than four turbochargers. It’s also got a total of ten radiators. Output is rated at a staggering 987 horsepower (some estimates place it closer to 1,000 horsepower) and 922 pound-feet of torque through a high-performance AWD system, which is enough to propel the Veyron to a top speed in excess of 250 mph.

The Veyron is like a 10 year-old’s daydream come to life, packed with extremes in every possible way. But that was more than a decade ago, and Bugatti thinks it’s time to once again probe the limits of what’s possible on four wheels.

Enter the Chiron. Once again, the engine of choice is a quad-turbo 8.0-liter W-16, but output sees a rise to 1,479 horsepower and 1,180 pound-feet of torque. With power routed to the pavement by way of seven-speed dual-clutch transmission and AWD, the Chiron manages a run to 60 mph in just 2.5 seconds, 120 mph in 6.5 seconds, and 190 mph in 13.6 seconds. Top speed is electronically limited at a mind-boggling 261 mph, but some estimates place the true top speed around 288 mph. Of course, all this speed doesn’t come cheap, as each Chiron carries a price tag that’s equally outrageous – try around $2.6 million per unit.

Read the full review here.

Tesla Model S P100 D

2017 Tesla Model S Exterior
- image 721121
An upgraded 100-kWh battery pack juices all four wheels with as much as 779 horsepower and 920 pound-feet of torque

If you love speed, but prefer to indulge in an all-electric flavor, then Tesla has the perfect solution. Unveiled in 2012, the Model S was an immediate smash hit, packing style and luxury into a sleek four-door package with impressive range between charges. But the really big deal (at least as far we were concerned) was the speed that was possible when you put your foot down. The original Model S offered a Performance model laying down 416 horsepower and 443 pound-feet of torque, but the latest high-spec iteration makes more. A lot more.

It’s called the P100 D, and it definitely lives up to its Ludicrous Mode hype. Power is derived from an upgraded 100-kWh battery pack, which juices all four wheels with as much as 779 horsepower and 920 pound-feet of torque, blessing the sedan with a 0-to-60 mph time of 2.4 seconds. Don’t lift, and you’ll hit the quarter mile in about 10.5 seconds at 125 mph.

Specs like that make the Tesla one of the quickest street cars on the market, and all without burning a drop of gasoline. Look out, internal combustion – the battery suckers are on their way.

Read the full review here.

Koenigsegg One:1

2015 Koenigsegg One:1
- image 721120
The One:1 can hit the 62-mph benchmark in roughly 2.5 seconds, 100 mph in 4.5 seconds, and 186 mph in 11.9 seconds

Koenigsegg is a Swedish-based boutique supercar builder that’s been making heads spin since 2002. Look into its history, and you’ll find a variety of automobiles carrying spec sheets that look like they belong to a jet fighter, rather than a street-legal coupe. And while there are plenty of fast examples to pick through, the most noteworthy of the bunch is the venerated Koenigsegg One:1.

Introduced in 2014 at the Geneva International Motor Show, the One:1 is an evolution of the Agera R, taking the preceding model even further with an incredible one-to-one power-to-weight ratio, hence the name. That means this thing is packing one whole horsepower for every kilogram of weight, or 1,360 ponies and 1,360 kg, respectively.

As such, Koenigsegg claims the One:1 as the world’s very first “megacar,” with a megawatt of power routed to the rear axle thanks to a twin-turbo 5.0-liter V-8 by way of a seven-speed dual-clutch paddle-shift transmission. Torque is rated at 1,011 pound-feet. All told, the One:1 can hit the 62-mph benchmark in roughly 2.5 seconds, 100 mph in 4.5 seconds, and 186 mph in 11.9 seconds. Top speed is estimated to be 280 mph, although the proper testing (not to mention tires that can take the abuse) are still required for verification. The thing can stop too, managing a run to 186 mph and back down to zero again in 17.95 seconds.

In total, Koenigsegg produced just six units, each slotting in at $2.4 million.

Read the full review here.

McLaren F1

1993 McLaren F1 High Resolution Exterior
- image 674555
The sprint from 0 to 60 mph happened in just 3.2 seconds, while 100 mph was achieved in 6.3 seconds

At this point, the legendary F1 might be getting a little grey around the temples, but its spec sheet stands the test of time. Revealed back in May of 1992, the F1 was McLaren’s very first street car, offering motorsport-level performance in a road-going package. It certainly looks the part, with an downforce-friendly, low-and-wide wedge design that looks like it was plucked straight from the starting grid at Le Mans. The interior also gets the racer-for-the-road theme, with a three-seat layout that places the driver front and center.

Under the body panels, the F1 uses a carbon fiber monocoque chassis, setting the standard for modern super cars in terms of lightness and rigidity. Materials like magnesium and titanium up the model’s spaceship-like appeal, while behind the cabin is a naturally aspirated 6.1-liter V-12, sourced from BMW and producing 627 horsepower and 480 pound-feet of torque through the rear wheels by way of a manual six-speed transmission. Gold foil is used as a heat reflector in the engine bay.

While 627 horsepower might not seem like that much in the era of 840-horsepower muscle cars and four-figure hypercars, it was the way in which the F1 applied that output that truly made it stand out. The sprint from 0 to 60 mph happened in just 3.2 seconds, while 100 mph was achieved in 6.3 seconds. In 28 seconds, the F1 could hit 200 mph. Most impressively, McLaren verified the car’s top speed in 1998, managing a breathtaking 240 mph and setting a new world record. That record stood for nearly a decade until 2005, when Bugatti unleashed the Veyron to best the F1 with its slightly faster 250-mph top speed.

Read the full review here.

What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: