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2020 Toyota Supra - Driven

2020 Toyota Supra - Driven

The legend returns for round five

Toyota introduced the Supra nameplate back in the late ‘70s with the A40 Celica Supra. The second-gen A60 arrived in 1981, followed by the third-gen A70 in 1986, and the fourth-gen A80 in 1993. Unfortunately, following dwindling sales numbers and stricter emissions laws, the U.S.-spec A80 got the axe in 1998. Now, more than two decades later, this import performance icon is back for an all-new fifth generation. Unsurprisingly, the Supra has been subjected to nearly endless scrutiny from both the motoring press and the enthusiast public, but first-hand experience has been sorely lacking. Until now, that is. Toyota flew me out to Virginia to drive the 2020 Supra both on a racetrack and on the street, and I found out exactly what it brings to the table.

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This Is Why You Should Stop Calling the 2020 Toyota Supra a “Rebadged BMW”

This Is Why You Should Stop Calling the 2020 Toyota Supra a “Rebadged BMW”

Toyota’s influence can be found from the ground up

Like death and taxes, Internet comments asserting that the 2020 Toyota Supra isn’t a “real” Toyota seem inevitable. On the surface, the accusation seems justified. After all, the Supra and 2019 BMW Z4 share the same platform, engine, and transmission. Hell, even the switchgear is similar. So where exactly does the BMW end and the Toyota begin?

Well, according to Chief Engineer Tetsuya Tada, Toyota’s influence can be found from the ground up. I recently got a chance to climb behind the wheel of the 2020 Toyota Supra during a ride-and-drive event in Virginia, and Tada-san was in attendance to help answer our questions, providing clarification on the nature of Toyota’s partnership with BMW during the A90 Supra’s development.

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There's a Good Reason Why Toyota Teamed up With BMW to Build the 2020 Supra

There’s a Good Reason Why Toyota Teamed up With BMW to Build the 2020 Supra

It wasn’t about convenience or money; it was about doing it the right way

Toyota’s decision to team up with BMW in the development of the Supra was never a popular decision. It wasn’t back when it was announced in 2012, and it still isn’t seven years later with the Supra’s imminent production launch. But Toyota had its reasons, or, more specifically, Tetsuya Tada, the car’s chief engineer, and Toyota’s performance boss, had his reasons. It wasn’t so much about the convenience of working with BMW as it was realizing his vision for the Supra. This is, after all, the same man who was supposed to develop the successor of the MkIV Supra back in the ’90s before those plans were scrapped. But Tada eventually got his chance, and he wasn’t about to throw it away, even if it meant looking elsewhere — hello, BMW — for help in building the sports car he waited almost two decades to bring to life.

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The 2020 Toyota Supra Has a Hatchback Trunk With An Open Pass-Through to the Front

The 2020 Toyota Supra Has a Hatchback Trunk With An Open Pass-Through to the Front

Checking out what the new Supra offers in terms of practicality

The 2020 Toyota Supra was designed with one very clear goal in mind - fun behind the wheel. However, given the Supra is still a road car that folks will likely drive on the street with, you know, stuff in it, it’s worth checking out what it offers in terms of practicality. Luckily, the Supra does indeed come with a hatchback cargo area that can fit stuff inside it.

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2020 Toyota Supra vs 2014 Toyota FT-1 Concept

2020 Toyota Supra vs 2014 Toyota FT-1 Concept

The Toyota Supra owes a lot of its makeup to the Toyota FT-1 Concept

The arrival of the Toyota Supra earlier this year marked the culmination of year’s worth of development from Toyota. Most people forget this now, but word of the Supra’s revival goes all the way back to 2007 when Toyota unveiled the FT-HS Concept at the 2007 North American International Auto Show. That never materialized, but it also didn’t stop the speculation surrounding the Supra’s fate, especially when Toyota filed a trademark for the “Supra” name back in 2010. Then, in 2014, Toyota debuted the FT-1 Concept at the same show as the FT-HS Concept seven years before. For all intents and purposes, the FT-1’s arrival kick-started the development of the new Supra. Toyota and BMW worked together on the development of the sports car alongside the latter’s Z4 Roadster. It took some time, but after five years, the world finally saw the production Supra at this year’s NAIAs. As expected, a lot of what made the new Supra what it is today can be tied back to the FT-1 Concept from five years ago. How much, exactly? Let’s find out.

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2020 Toyota Supra Interior First Impressions

2020 Toyota Supra Interior First Impressions

A sports car cocoon made for speed

After years of waiting, endless teasers, and more than a few false flags, the fifth-generation A90 Supra is finally here. Carrying the torch as Toyota’s modernized performance icon and halo vehicle, the 2020 Supra has plenty to live up to. And while most of you are chomping at the bit to learn what it’s like to drive, you’ll have to wait until the embargo lifts on Sunday for my full driven review. Until then, I want to relay everything I can about this machine, including my first impression of the interior.

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Maybe The 2020 Toyota Supra Isn't Compatible With the Nurburgring After All

Maybe The 2020 Toyota Supra Isn’t Compatible With the Nurburgring After All

Looks like the Toyota Supra needs to get more acquainted with the Green Hell

Toyota may want to hold off on building its own version of the Nurburgring in Japan because it appears that the Supra doesn’t agree with the actual Nurburgring. The Japanese automaker’s new prized sports car crashed at the ‘Ring in a testing session that occurred during Industry Pool. The crash occurred at the Nordschleife’s Exmühle section, and available photos show that it was significant enough to cause the Supra’s bumper to get torn off completely. Details are limited on how the crash actually occurred, though considering where it occurred, the driver may have misjudged the racing line through this area, leading to a bit of understeer that ultimately led to the driver losing control of the sports car. Either way, the crashed Supra looks like it’s in need of a lot of repairs.

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The 2020 Toyota Supra's Styling Is Growing On Me

The 2020 Toyota Supra’s Styling Is Growing On Me

After spending several hours with it, I’m finding it more and more attractive

When Toyota released the new fifth-generationA90 Supra at the 2019 Detroit Auto Show, I wasn’t terribly impressed by its styling, saying that it looked like a “dumbed-down, bastardized version” of the FT-1 concept upon which it was based. And I still think that’s true - the FT-1 is an amazing piece of design, and the production A90 Supra can’t live up to the standard it sets. However, after spending some one-on-one time with the A90 in Virginia (courtesy of Toyota), I’m starting to come around.

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The 2020 Toyota Supra Is Surprisingly Small In Person

The 2020 Toyota Supra Is Surprisingly Small In Person

Toyota’s halo sports car gets it done without supersizing

I just got back from Middleburg, Virginia, where Toyota provided me with a 2020 Supra to flog around a racetrack. You’ll have to come back Sunday for my full in-depth driving impressions and review, but until then, there’s still a few things to say about the brand’s latest performance machine. For starters, the new Supra is surprisingly small in person.

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Here's Why Toyota Won't Bring the Four-Cylinder 2020 Supra to the United States?

Here’s Why Toyota Won’t Bring the Four-Cylinder 2020 Supra to the United States?

There could be a number of reasons, but one of them could be traced to the 86

Toyota’s decision to offer the Supra with a turbo six-cylinder engine in the U.S. has been met with mixed reactions. Most of the people who have voiced concern over the U.S.-spec Supra’s lack of engine diversity now have a new gripe on their hands after it was revealed that the California Air Resource Board has given its approval for the four-cylinder Supra to be sold in the U.S. market. Where is exactly is the gripe coming from? It turns out, even with the CARB approval, Toyota’s not changing its mind. The four-cylinder Supra is still not headed to the U.S. market, even if the option to bring it is already on the table. The automaker didn’t specify its reasons for keeping the four-cylinder Supra away from the eager beavers in the U.S., but if you think about it, that decision could have something to do with the company’s other sports car on the market: the Toyota 86.

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2020 Toyota Supra Vs. 2019 BMW Z4

2020 Toyota Supra Vs. 2019 BMW Z4

Are they really clones, or is there more to it?

Few sports cars can rustle the ‘ole jimmies quite like the 2020 Supra and 2019 BMW Z4. Built as a collaborative effort between the two automaker giants, each is a rebirth of a long-lost nameplate, sliding into a market where sports cars are on the decline. However, despite efforts to meet the demands of an enthusiast-driven public, many decry the Supra and Z4 as nothing more than badge-engineered twins designed to leverage fond memories. But the question remains - how do these two machines stack up against one another?

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Video: Is the 2020 Toyota Supra Really Just a Rebadged BMW?

Video: Is the 2020 Toyota Supra Really Just a Rebadged BMW?

Getting past the Internet comments and looking at some of the facts

When Toyota reintroduced the Supra nameplate at the 2019 Detroit Auto Show, the public reaction was mixed. While some applauded the return of the iconic Japanese sports car, others derided it as nothing more than a rebadged BMW Z4. And while there’s some truth to that sentiment, the reality is much more complicated, as explored in this well-researched video from YouTube user Albon.

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