Toyota renames the Trail & Trail Premium trims

Beyond the name change, the 4Runner remains basically intact. The trim level lineup still contains the base SR5, the better-equipped SR5 Premium, the luxury oriented Limited, and the all-out off-roader, the TRD Pro. Positioned above the SR5 Premium grade, the Off-Road and the Off-Road Premium trims will bring an extra level of ruggedness to the 4Runner without driving prices skyward.

Of course, Toyota has yet to announce official pricing for the trim levels; 2017 is still a ways off. Nevertheless, expect the renamed trims to follow the previously laid groundwork. That suggests the 4Runner Off-Road will start around $37,000 while the better-equipped Off-Road Premium carries a $40,000 price tag. While pricey, it’s still less expensive than the 4Runner TRD Pro, which itself will likely get a price hike to $42,000.

Expect the 2017 Toyota 4Runner with its new trim levels to hit showrooms in the fall of 2016. We’ll bring updates on pricing and availability when Toyota releases the info.

Continue reading to learn more about the Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road Premium.

  • 2017 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road
  • Year:
    2017
  • Make:
  • Model:
  • Transmission:
    Five-Speed Automatic
  • Horsepower @ RPM:
    270
  • Torque @ RPM:
    278
  • Displacement:
    4.0 L
  • 0-60 time:
    8.5 sec. (Est.)
  • Top Speed:
    110 mph (Est.)
  • Layout:
    Front Engine; 4WD
  • car segment:
  • body style:

What makes the Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road Premium special

2017 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road High Resolution Exterior
- image 683443

Starting with the 4Runner Off-Road trim, the SUV will come with new black-painted wheels and a TRD Off-Road badge on the C-pillar. Inside, the 4Runner will have a carbon fiber-looking material on the center console and floormats with the TRD Off-Road designation.

Opting for the TRD Off-Road Premium trim gets you the same black wheels and exterior badging, along with red TRD lettering on the front headrests. Toyota’s press material doesn’t dive further, but if the a similar breakdown happens between the Off-Road and Off-Road Premium as it does with the Trail and Trail Premium, expect the Off-Road Premium to offer the premium SofTex seats with power adjustable controls for both front occupants, turn signals in the outside mirrors, a moonroof, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, and the HomeLink Universal Transceiver system.

2017 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road High Resolution Exterior
- image 683444

Both Off-Road trim levels will come standard with the same mechanical features, however. This includes Toyota’s venerable (yet aging) 4.0-liter V-6 that makes 270 horsepower and 278 pound-feet of torque mated to a five-speed automatic. Toyota’s part-time 4WD system with its old-school, manually shifted transfer case comes standard as well. It might seem low-tech, but the do-it-yourself engagement of the 4Runner’s transfer case is uniquely satisfying.

The 4WD system is supplemented by Toyota’s A-TRAC system, Multi-Terrain Select, and CRAWL Control. Multi-Terrain Select allows the driver to dial in what type of terrain he’s crossing, be it mud and sand, rock, moguls, or loose rocks. The system adjusts throttle inputs, ABS and stability control, and Hill Descent Control for a more user-friendly off-roading experience. CRAWL control basically boils down to an off-road cruise control. It allows the 4Runner to maintain one of five preset speeds using throttle and brake inputs, giving the driver the freedom to concentrate on steering. Speeds can be set between a crawl and a slow walking pace.

Furthermore, the 4Runner has its A-TRAC system, which automatically uses individual braking to route engine torque to the wheels with the most traction. It uses the ABS sensors to detect wheel speed and then applies braking force to the wheel with the least traction, effectively tricking the open differential into sending power to the wheel with more traction. Though A-TRAC works well, it falls short of the 4Runner’s best off-road weapon: its electronically locking rear differential. Able to be engaged in 4WD Low Range, the rear locker binds the rear wheels together, forcing them to spin at the same speed, regardless of traction.

2017 Toyota 4Runner TRD Off-Road High Resolution Exterior
- image 683442

All told, the 4Runner is one of the last body-on-frame, mid-sized SUVs on the market. Besides the Jeep Wrangler, the 4Runner is perhaps the best choice for hard-core off-roading.

Be sure to read our full driven review of the 2013 Toyota 4Runner Trail Edition and the side-by-side comparison of the 2015 4Runner TRD Pro against the legendary Jeep Wrangler Unlimited.

2015 Toyota 4Runner

2015 Toyota 4Runner - Driven
- image 658688

Read our full review on the 2015 Toyota 4Runner here.

Press Release

Adding to its impressive off-road credibility, the 2017 4Runner will be available in two new grades — TRD Off-Road and TRD Off-Road Premium. Both grades offer distinctive TRD (Toyota Racing Development) branding to stand out anywhere a 4Runner can travel.

Since its introduction in 1985, the 4Runner’s body-on-frame architecture has enabled the SUV to traverse challenging terrain while comfortably transporting people and all the gear they need for their adventures.

For four decades, TRD has been racing off-road and that heritage is reflected in these new grades. The exterior of the TRD Off-Road 4Runner features black painted wheels and a unique TRD Off-Road badge on the C-pillar. Inside, the center console has a carbon fiber look and the floor mats feature the TRD Off-Road designation. The TRD Off-Road Premium 4Runner also adds “TRD” red lettering on the headrests for the driver and front passenger.

Under the rugged exterior of the Off-Road and Off-Road Premium grades, advanced capability is built into the 4Runner, including the Multi-Terrain Select system which allows the driver to use a dial to select the mode that matches prevailing terrain and conditions, adjusting wheel slip accordingly. The 4Runner lives up to its name with an electronic-locking rear differential and Toyota’s Crawl Control (CRAWL) feature. The latter helps maintain a constant speed, enhancing vehicle control when driving up and over obstacles in challenging off-road situations. With the transfer case shifted into low range, CRAWL regulates both engine speed and braking force to propel the vehicle forward or in reverse at one of the five driver-selectable low-speed settings. The driver can thus focus on steering over obstacles without having to also modulate the throttle or brake pedal.

Further off-road credentials include superior approach and departure angles, high ground clearance and available suspension upgrades. The available Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System (KDSS) facilitates extended wheel travel at slow speeds for greater off-road capability and stability. For example, on loose terrain such as mud and sand, more-than-normal wheel slip is permitted, allowing wheel-spin to work in the vehicle’s favor. The Mogul setting is for any extremely uneven terrain, such as V-ditches, slopes, and ridges — uphill or down. In this mode, wheel slip is minimized and the system acts more like a limited slip differential.

“The 4Runner has a large and loyal following, with dependability being a key factor. Of all the 4Runners purchased in the last ten years, 90 percent are still on the road,” said John Myers, national manager, trucks and SUVs, Toyota Vehicle Marketing and Communications. “4Runner owners often take their SUVs off the beaten path, so these new TRD Off-Road grades will be a popular recognition of TRD’s history in the off-road arena.”

The 2017 4Runner will be available in six grades: SR5, SR5 Premium, TRD Off-Road, TRD Off-Road Premium, Limited, and TRD Pro. Pricing for all grades will be available prior to the 4Runner’s launch later this year.

View the full press release Hide press release
Press release
What do you think?
Show Comments
Car Finder: