Back to Toyota

Toyota Diesel Cars

Models

view thumbnails grid view horizontal compact blog view
Toyota Thinks Gas Engine Cars Will Be Gone By 2050

Toyota Thinks Gas Engine Cars Will Be Gone By 2050

The advancements we’ve made in electrical storage and electric motors clearly indicates that the combustion engine will eventually become a thing of the past. Imagine, if you will, a reality where gas stations don’t exist. Instead, we’ll have charging stations or hydrogen stations. The bottom line is, when we get to that point, we’ll have completely renewable energy sources and just about every car on the road will put out zero emissions. So when will this future be? Toyota says it’s coming sooner than later, as a recent report says it plans to reduce new-car CO2 emissions by 90 percent by 2050.

Toyota’s Senior Managing Officer has gone on record saying: “You may think 35 years is a long time, but for an automaker to envision all combustion engines as gone is pretty extraordinary.” And, let’s not beat around the bush – it does sound a little far-fetched, but you have to keep in mind just how far the company has come in such little time. Toyota did invent the marketplace for hybrid vehicles with the Prius back in 1997. Toyota’s plans don’t include taking the same path as Tesla on its journey to becoming a zero-emissions manufacturer. Instead of focusing on battery-powered vehicles like the Tesla Model S and the Nissan Leaf, Toyota wants to build on the concept of hydrogen powered vehicles like the Toyota Mirai.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
No Diesel Version For The Redesigned Toyota Tacoma

No Diesel Version For The Redesigned Toyota Tacoma

As the dust settles over the past two major auto shows in Detroit and Chicago, it’s important to look back at the details. One key detail that brings tears to diesel-loving truck fans’ eyes is the news Toyota will not offer an oil-burner in the all-new 2016 Tacoma. The news comes directly from the top – Tacoma and Tundra chief engineer Mike Sweers. His words rang very clearly during a post-debut interview regarding the details of the new Tacoma.

“We will not be offing a diesel engine. We’ve looked at diesels, and diesel is a difficult topic right now because of the new Tier 3 emissions regulations,” Sweers says. “After treatment systems are very expensive. It adds $3,000 or more dollars per vehicle cost. So if we consider that cost verses the fuel economy improvement, and the fact diesel is $1 more per gallon more than gasoline, is there a return on the investment?”

Sweers continued by pointing out the emissions regulations are only going to get stricter. “As we more towards the future and we get past 2017 then 2019 emissions regulations, can you make that diesel survive?” Sweers continued saying any diesel engine today would have to pass those upcoming regulations in order for Toyota’s investment to produce a return.

It’s hard to fault Toyota after hearing such a logical explanation, but it’s still sad the automaker has apparently abandoned the diesel ideal altogether.

Click ‘Continue Reading’ for more information and Sweer’s full quote.

Read more
2016 Toyota Tundra

2016 Toyota Tundra

Note: Current generation pictured here.

It appears Toyota will be the next automaker to adopt diesel technology into its full-size truck segment. According to WardsAuto, the Tundra will be getting a V-8 diesel powerplant when its next generation debuts in 2016. What’s more, word has it Tundra’s new oil-burner will be supplied by famed diesel builder, Cummins. And not just any Cummins at that…

It will be a version of the same 5.0-liter V-8 turbodiesel that rival truck-builder Nissan has slotted to power its next-generation Titan set to debut next year. Not only is this huge news for Tundra fans, it represents uncharted territory in diesel engine sharing on the light-duty level. Truck buyers are a fiercely loyal bunch, so it will be interesting to see where exactly loyalties fall — with the truck- or engine-builder.

There’s no official word on how the Tundra’s diesel will compare to the Titan’s, which is said to be rated at “more than” 300 horsepower and 500 pound-feet of torque. The only sure thing is the certainty of some very intense engineering meetings between the three companies.

The overriding reason diesels are catching headlines these days is the need for automakers to meet the impending CAFÉ standards that are tightening up on corporate average mpg ratings. The target: a company average of 54.5 mpg by 2025. Nissan and Toyota aren’t the first to go diesel. Ram, in fact, already has their 3.0-liter V-6 EcoDiesel currently on sale in the U.S. Rated at 240 horsepower and 420 pound-feet of torque, the EcoDiesel Ram 1500 achieves a class-leading 20 mpg city/28 mpg highway.

Click past the jump to read more about the 2016 Toyota Tundra.

Read more
Turbodiesel engines coming soon?

Turbodiesel engines coming soon?

Diesel engine saves you money on fuel. The question is by how much? A normal gas fueled Dodge Ram 1500 pickup can on average can get about 15mpg city and 19mpg on highway. A Diesel fueled 1500 pickup can get about 19.5mpg city and almost 25mpg on highway. Diesel engines could save you money, and help out the environment.

Read more