Back to Toyota

Toyota Full-Size Cars

The Toyota Tundra TRD Pro Gets More Capable for 2019

The Toyota Tundra TRD Pro Gets More Capable for 2019

Upgrades shocks, more wheel travel, and Exterior mods take center stage

The biggest member of Toyota’s TRD Pro trio, the Tundra TRD Pro, is getting similar updates as the Tacoma and 4Runner TRD Pros for 2019. This includes updated Fox Racing Shocks and a few cosmetic changes to keep things fresh. The 2019 Tundra TRD Pro can easily be picked out thanks to its new secondary hood scoop and new 18-inch BBS forged-aluminum wheels.

As with its TRD Pro stablemates, the Tundra TRD Pro will arrive in showrooms in the fall of 2018. Toyota hasn’t released pricing yet, but here at the 2018 Chicago Auto Show, we’re getting our first look at the truck. Keep reading for the details.

Continue reading for more on the 2019 Toyota Tundra TRD Pro.

Read more
Does The Face Of The Toyota Sequoia Hint At What We Can Expect For The Next Toyota Tundra?

Does The Face Of The Toyota Sequoia Hint At What We Can Expect For The Next Toyota Tundra?

Bringing Toyota’s line of trucks and SUVs into the modern era

The Toyota Sequoia and Toyota Tundra are both well-known in their respective segments, but lately, that reputation is derived from the fact that both are getting rather long in the tooth. The Sequoia was first put into production in September of 2000, with a second generation arriving in 2008 along with only a handful of meaningful updates since. Meanwhile, the Tundra first rolled off the line in May of 1999, with the latest second-gen arriving in 2007. Both these nameplates are just aching for a next-generation model to arrive, and Toyota has said it’s working on bringing consumers exactly that in the near future. What we wanna know is this – what will the next model years bring to the table before the third-gens finally arrive? To answer that, we can look to the latest 2018 model year for the Sequoia, which, despite its age, brings a few nice changes to the party.

For starters, the Sequoia is most definitely an old-school affair, offering classic SUV goodness like a ladder frame, part-time 4WD, and a meaty V-8 under the hood. LED lights are provided for illumination of the road ahead, while a few styling tweaks spruce up the old fascia. The gauges were also updated, while the modernized infotainment system comes with complementary safety systems like adaptive cruise control, automatic high-beam headlights, and pedestrian detection. Meanwhile, a 5.7-liter ’eight provides 380 horsepower and 400 pound-feet of torque.

Prior to the Tundra’s inevitable next-gen refresh, we’d expect the same sort of upgrades – small styling updates, the latest headlights, new infotainment gear, and small interior updates. The V-8 options (310-horsepower 4.6-liter and an up-rated 381-horsepower 5.7-liter) should go pretty much unchanged. Once we get the third generation, though, all bets are off, with far-reaching updates across the board.

What do you wanna see from the new Tundra?

Read more
2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven

An aging, lumbering beast that somehow wins hearts with its old-school vibes

The Toyota Sequoia is alive and kicking. You’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten, even despite Toyota giving the full-size SUV a slight update for 2018. The Sequoia’s sales pale in comparison to its rivals, and as such, there are simply fewer on the road. But that doesn’t mean the Sequoia is a bad SUV, right? We decided to have a look.

Our tester came decked out with all the extra goodies thanks to the range-topping Platinum trim. Of course, it also carried all the update Toyota gave it for the 2018 model year, including a new nose, a revised gauge cluster, and the now-standard Toyota Safety Sense-P active safety system. Beyond that, however, the 2018 Sequoia looks and feels nearly identically to the 2008 version.

It’s hard to believe the Sequoia’s second-generation is now a decade old. It harks back to Toyota’s major revamp of the Tundra pickup. It changed to a full-size truck for the 2007 model year and the Sequoia followed suit the next year. The Sequoia shares plenty with the Tundra, including its drivetrain and interior. Toyota did cater the Sequoia towards family usage with an independent rear suspension with available air ride rather than the Tundra’s solid axle and leaf springs. Yet despite the differences, the Sequoia still felt like a truck. In practice though, many full-size SUV customers were into that sort of thing. It fosters a sense of invincibility and a go-anywhere attitude. Well, so long as there’s a gas station close by.

Continue reading for our full review.

Read more
What it's Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

What it’s Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

Piloting this lumbering giant through the urban jungle

Open the heavy door, use the running board to climb inside, sit atop a leather seat with a wood and leather-wrapped steering wheel in hand, and gaze over the world like a king riding his chariot. That’s what it’s like getting into the driver’s seat of the 2018 Toyota Sequoia.

Despite its age, the Sequoia isn’t bad to drive. Its 381-horsepower, 5.7-liter V-8 offers plenty of pep, especially with its 401 pound-feet of torque and a 4.30 rear axle ratio. The sprint to 60 mph takes only 6.7 seconds and its top speed is capped at 115 mph. The Sequoia might share much of its architecture with the Tundra pickup, but Toyota ditched the solid rear axle and leaf springs in favor of an independent suspension with airbags. The front suspension uses MacPherson struts between the double wishbone control arms. The Platinum trim even comes with adaptive dampers with Sport, Normal, and Comfort modes.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

An aging design get slight changes, remains massively roomy

Toyota’s truck-based, full-size SUV, the Sequoia, is big. Its exterior dimensions are imposing and its interior volume feels like the vastness of an airplane hanger. The three-row SUV boasts seating for up to eight people and has an impressive amount of cargo area. This week we’re testing the refreshed 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum optioned with the Red Rock interior color. Standard with the Platinum trim is the second-row captain’s chairs with the center console. That might reduce the Sequoia’s seating to seven, but it adds an air of luxury not had with the bench seat.

The Sequoia has a 2+2+3 seating arrangement. While three across in the third row spells disaster is most crossovers, the girthy Sequoia has room enough for actual people back here. There’s even an impressive amount of legroom thanks to the sliding second-row bucket seats.

There’s more to the Sequoia’s interior, so keep reading for our impressions.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty

The ole 5.7-liter V-8 has a drinking problem

The Toyota Sequoia has undergone a mild refresh for 2018, bringing a slightly different front fascia, a slightly revised dash, and the Toyota Safety Sense-P as standard equipment. But unfortunately, the rest of this full-size SUV dates back to 2008. Yep, that’s a full decade without change. That includes the 5.7-liter V-8, six-speed automatic transmission, and the optional part-time 4WD system.

Now, the 5.7-liter isn’t a bad engine. Its dual overhead camshafts use variable valve timing on both the intake and exhaust sides to offer better low-speed efficiency with high-end power. The engine generates 381 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 401 pound-feet of torque at 3,600 rpm. And like all good V-8s, the engine makes plenty of torque down low; Toyota says the 5.7-liter makes 90 percent of peak torque at just 2,200 rpm. That certainly helps with off-the-line power and allowing the six-speed automatic to up-shift sooner and hold gears longer.

Nevertheless, the V-8 does not have modern features like cylinder deactivation or direct fuel injection. And these days, eight- and 10-speed automatic transmissions continue to squeeze more and more from a gallon of gas.

The Sequoia, on the other hand, is EPA-estimated to only achieve 13 mpg city, 17 mpg highway, and 14 mpg combined. Over the last few days of mixed driving, I’m only averaging 13.3 mpg. Ouch.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool

A ladder frame, part-time 4WD, and a big V-8 add character

The Toyota Sequoia is far from the newest or most technologically advanced SUV on the road, even after its mild update for the 2018 model year. Rather, this three-row people mover is firmly planted in the past. It rides on a traditional ladder frame, uses a part-time 4WD system with low-range gears, and has a limited-slip center differential that can be completely locked on the fly.

While I have knocked the 2018 Sequoia for its very minor update and its poor fuel economy, the SUV remains impressive in the sense that it retains all the aspects of a traditional SUV. Yeah, it doesn’t have a solid rear axle and leaf springs, but it does have just about everything else that has made SUVs so utilitarian and lovable since the 1950s.

Let’s check out the Toyota Sequoia’s rugged underpinnings.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

Minor changes keep the Sequoia hanging on

Toyota has given the full-size Sequoia SUV a mild update for the 2018 model year. In fact, “mild” is putting it, well, mildly. Yet these changes are the biggest news for the Sequoia since its introduction in 2008 – a full decade ago. Needless to say, Toyota isn’t paying too much attention to the big brute. Its sales reflect this, too, with the Sequoia only moving 12,156 examples in 2017.

The most surprising thing is a rather steady rate of the Sequoia’s sales numbers. Toyota has sold between 11,806 and 13,848 Sequoias annually since 2010. Of course, that’s a far cry from the 70,187 Sequoias Toyota moved during the SUV’s first year in 2002. It also pales in comparison to its competition. The Chevrolet Tahoe found homes in 103,306 driveways in 2016 and the Ford Expedition sold 59,835 examples during the same time – and that wasn’t even the new aluminum-bodied model that’s new for 2018.

Nevertheless, Toyota’s updates for the 2018 Sequoia are likely to help attract customers. Just don’t expect a massive surge in people banging down Toyota’s door for the old-school, body-on-frame SUV.

We happen to be driving the 2018 Toyota Sequoia this week. Our tester is fitted in the range-topping Platinum trim, meaning it comes basically standard with all the optional extras Toyota has to offer. So, let’s check out what’s different about the 2018 model and see if it helps the ole Sequoia’s case.

Continue reading for more on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia.

Read more
2018 Toyota Hilux

2018 Toyota Hilux

More variants bring more choice to customers

The Toyota Hilux pickup receives several new trims for the 2018 model year. These include three new SR cab-chassis variants, a new WorkMate grade for the 4WD Double Cab-Chassis, and the Hi-Rider option on 2WD trucks is now offered on the WorkMate Double-Cab, SR Extra Cab, and the SR5 Double Cab. What’s more, the availability of an automatic transmission expands from 12 models to 17 models. In other words, there are now more choices for customers.

This is the first change Toyota has brought to the Hilux since the current generation’s introduction in 2016. It comes in part as a response to changing customer wants as the expectation for higher comfort levels increase, while the need for work-grade trims holds steady. In fact, Toyota saw more than 60 percent of new Hilux sales have automatic transmissions – a first for the rugged pickup.

Continue reading for more information.

Read more
Toyota Takes High-Tech Approach With New Avalon Hybrid

Toyota Takes High-Tech Approach With New Avalon Hybrid

Will digital goodies and extra mpg entice buyers to ditch their crossovers?

It’s no secret that the sedan body style is under fire these days, losing ground to the ever-popular SUV and crossover segment year after year. However, Toyota is confident it’ll still move units, ushering in a new fifth generation for its full-size Avalon four-door at the 2018 Detroit Auto Show. The big draw this time around is the technology stuffed into the cabin, as well as a new hybrid powertrain under the hood.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
2019 Toyota Avalon Gets More Aggressive, Boasts New Tech at Detroit

2019 Toyota Avalon Gets More Aggressive, Boasts New Tech at Detroit

The Avalon moves from sleepy to sultry

Toyota has undoubtedly heard cries from customers and journalists alike bemoaning its boring sedans. But no more. The 2019 Avalon is following in the 2018 Camry’s footsteps by going sporty. The new Avalon ditches the dull styling for some excitement as it moves into its fifth generation.

Toyota calls the Avalon its “mid-premium sedan” and has packed the car with loads of luxury features, more technology like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and made its Toyota Safety Sense P suite of active safety systems even more powerful. Improved powertrains include a reworked 3.5-liter V-6 and eight-speed automatic transmission, along with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder with Toyota’s newest hybrid system and CVT transmission.

There are four trim levels available: the XSE, Touring, XLE, Limited. Hybrid models come in XLE, Limited, and XSE grades.

Read more
2018 Toyota Research Institute Platform 3.0 Autonomous Car

2018 Toyota Research Institute Platform 3.0 Autonomous Car

The company’s autonomous Lexus LS gains new LIDAR sensors

A few years ago, concept cars were mostly about futuristic design features and new technology. This is still available today, but most automakers are including semi or fully autonomous driving systems in their show cars. This technology is supposed to become a production feature in 2021, and everyone is racing to get there first. Toyota is among those companies, and it just introduced an update to the LIDAR-equipped Lexus that it showed off twice in 2017. It’s still built around the old LS600hL — the Japanese firm launched a new LS last year — but it’s now called Platform 3.0 and comes with numerous upgrades.

The company’s Research Institute teamed up with more firms and departments than ever to create the third prototype, including CALTY Design Research in Michigan, Toyota Motor North America Research and Development, and Luminar. The latter has recently developed the most powerful LIDAR system on the market, which made its debut on this autonomous Lexus. Production of the CES-bound concept car is scheduled to commence this spring, but volume will be kept low, and all vehicles will be built for testing purposes only. Let’s find out more about Toyota’s most performant autonomous car yet in the review below.

Continue reading to find out more about the Toyota Research Institute Platform 3.0 autonomous car.

Read more