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The Toyota Tacoma, Tundra, and 4 Runner Just Got a Little More Outdoorsy

The Toyota Tacoma, Tundra, and 4 Runner Just Got a Little More Outdoorsy

These include the Nighshade Package and Trail Editions across four products

Toyota created a buzz before the 2020 Chicago Auto Show kicked off by announcing it’ll bring “sporty and outdoorsy, with a touch of nocturnal mischief.” to the show. Toyota teased the Tacoma’s front passenger side lower fascia in a teaser image leading to the auto show, but now we have all the scoop. The company has brought along Trail and Nightshade editions for a handful of its vehicles.

The Trail Editions are introduced on the 2021 models of the Tacoma, Tundra, and the 4Runner. They are aimed at folks who prefer rugged vehicles for a “sporty and outdoorsy” lifestyle. The Trail Edition will be based on the SR5 trims on all three vehicles. They will be offered in special exterior colors that include Army Green, Cement, Midnight Black, and Super White, and also receive black badging to distinguish from the regular SR5 trims. On the inside, Toyota has upholstered the vehicles in black seats with tan contrast stitching. All-weather floor mats also come as part of the package. The Tacoma Trail will come with stuff like:

Dark Gray 18-inch TRD Off-Road wheels Kevlar All-Terrain tires Front fascia grille borrowed from Tacoma Limited A 115-volt power outlet in the bed Lockable bed storage that doubles up as a cooler as well Limited to 7,000 Tacomas

As for the Tundra Trail, you receive:

Chrome grille from the 1794 trim Special Edition exclusive wheels Lockable bed storage-cum-cooler like on the Tacoma Trail Limited to 5,000 Tundras

The 4Runner Trail will be equipped with:

Dark Gray TRD Off-Road wheels Yakima LoadWarrior Rooftop Cargo Basket Custom 40-quart Cooler Sliding Cargo Tray Limited to 4,000 4Runners

Toyota has also blacked out a few more models in its portfolio. Currently, the company offers the Nightshade package on five of its products – 4Runner, Camry, Corolla, Corolla hatch, and Sienna – on the SE trims. Now, Toyota has added the Tacoma, Tundra, and Sequoia to the range as well. The Limited trims of these three vehicles will be treated to the Nightshade package. Customers can have the Nightshade package on these new vehicles in Midnight Black Metallic or Magnetic Gray Metallic exterior shade. Toyota offers this package on the Tacoma in Super White shade, too. The common package details across the three models include:

Black Leather Seats Blacked-Out Front Grille Black Mirror Caps Black Door Handles

Apart from this, the Tacoma Nightshade also receives:

Dark Smoke 18-inch Wheels A Black Exhaust Tip Black Fog Light Bezels New Grille Insert Design Offered in Windchill Pearl shade as well Limited to 5,000 Tacomas

On the Tundra, the company offers black wheels and black exhaust tip. Other than the two standard exterior shades, you can order it in Windchill Pearl, or Super White as well. Toyota will only make 5,000 examples of this one. As for the Sequoia, it receives darkened chrome "Sequoia" badging, body moldings, lower grille, and fog light surrounds. The SUV with the Nightshade package can be had in Blizzard Pearl shade as well. The company has limited the production to 2,500 examples for the Sequoia Nightshade.

Toyota hasn’t revealed the pricing for any of the Special Edition vehicles, but we don’t expect a major increase in any of them. The company also hasn’t announced when these vehicles will be available.

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2020 Toyota Sequoia TRD Pro

2020 Toyota Sequoia TRD Pro

Toyota decides to give the SUV another push by making it go rough and tough 18 years after its inception

Toyota has been jacking up its trucks and SUVs and slapping them with the TRD Pro cadge for a long time now. The ’TRD Pro’ suffix is a privilege of sorts these days, and the vehicles that are honored with it go on to become big. Seeing mainstream Toyota vehicles injected with TRD DNA are a blessing. At the Chicago Auto Show, the Japanese giant decided to add one more model to its lineup that included the Tundra, Tacoma, and the 4Runner. Toyota teased the new addition to the TRD Pro family a few days before the Chicago Auto Show commenced and people took wild guesses to figure out which model had been drugged. But Toyota dropped a bomb when the vehicle happened to be the age-old Sequoia SUV. Well, the rest is history.

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2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven

An aging, lumbering beast that somehow wins hearts with its old-school vibes

The Toyota Sequoia is alive and kicking. You’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten, even despite Toyota giving the full-size SUV a slight update for 2018. The Sequoia’s sales pale in comparison to its rivals, and as such, there are simply fewer on the road. But that doesn’t mean the Sequoia is a bad SUV, right? We decided to have a look.

Our tester came decked out with all the extra goodies thanks to the range-topping Platinum trim. Of course, it also carried all the update Toyota gave it for the 2018 model year, including a new nose, a revised gauge cluster, and the now-standard Toyota Safety Sense-P active safety system. Beyond that, however, the 2018 Sequoia looks and feels nearly identically to the 2008 version.

It’s hard to believe the Sequoia’s second-generation is now a decade old. It harks back to Toyota’s major revamp of the Tundra pickup. It changed to a full-size truck for the 2007 model year and the Sequoia followed suit the next year. The Sequoia shares plenty with the Tundra, including its drivetrain and interior. Toyota did cater the Sequoia towards family usage with an independent rear suspension with available air ride rather than the Tundra’s solid axle and leaf springs. Yet despite the differences, the Sequoia still felt like a truck. In practice though, many full-size SUV customers were into that sort of thing. It fosters a sense of invincibility and a go-anywhere attitude. Well, so long as there’s a gas station close by.

Continue reading for our full review.

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What it's Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

What it’s Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

Piloting this lumbering giant through the urban jungle

Open the heavy door, use the running board to climb inside, sit atop a leather seat with a wood and leather-wrapped steering wheel in hand, and gaze over the world like a king riding his chariot. That’s what it’s like getting into the driver’s seat of the 2018 Toyota Sequoia.

Despite its age, the Sequoia isn’t bad to drive. Its 381-horsepower, 5.7-liter V-8 offers plenty of pep, especially with its 401 pound-feet of torque and a 4.30 rear axle ratio. The sprint to 60 mph takes only 6.7 seconds and its top speed is capped at 115 mph. The Sequoia might share much of its architecture with the Tundra pickup, but Toyota ditched the solid rear axle and leaf springs in favor of an independent suspension with airbags. The front suspension uses MacPherson struts between the double wishbone control arms. The Platinum trim even comes with adaptive dampers with Sport, Normal, and Comfort modes.

Continue reading for more information.

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Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

An aging design get slight changes, remains massively roomy

Toyota’s truck-based, full-size SUV, the Sequoia, is big. Its exterior dimensions are imposing and its interior volume feels like the vastness of an airplane hanger. The three-row SUV boasts seating for up to eight people and has an impressive amount of cargo area. This week we’re testing the refreshed 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum optioned with the Red Rock interior color. Standard with the Platinum trim is the second-row captain’s chairs with the center console. That might reduce the Sequoia’s seating to seven, but it adds an air of luxury not had with the bench seat.

The Sequoia has a 2+2+3 seating arrangement. While three across in the third row spells disaster is most crossovers, the girthy Sequoia has room enough for actual people back here. There’s even an impressive amount of legroom thanks to the sliding second-row bucket seats.

There’s more to the Sequoia’s interior, so keep reading for our impressions.

Continue reading for more information.

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What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia

Minor changes keep the Sequoia hanging on

Toyota has given the full-size Sequoia SUV a mild update for the 2018 model year. In fact, “mild” is putting it, well, mildly. Yet these changes are the biggest news for the Sequoia since its introduction in 2008 – a full decade ago. Needless to say, Toyota isn’t paying too much attention to the big brute. Its sales reflect this, too, with the Sequoia only moving 12,156 examples in 2017.

The most surprising thing is a rather steady rate of the Sequoia’s sales numbers. Toyota has sold between 11,806 and 13,848 Sequoias annually since 2010. Of course, that’s a far cry from the 70,187 Sequoias Toyota moved during the SUV’s first year in 2002. It also pales in comparison to its competition. The Chevrolet Tahoe found homes in 103,306 driveways in 2016 and the Ford Expedition sold 59,835 examples during the same time – and that wasn’t even the new aluminum-bodied model that’s new for 2018.

Nevertheless, Toyota’s updates for the 2018 Sequoia are likely to help attract customers. Just don’t expect a massive surge in people banging down Toyota’s door for the old-school, body-on-frame SUV.

We happen to be driving the 2018 Toyota Sequoia this week. Our tester is fitted in the range-topping Platinum trim, meaning it comes basically standard with all the optional extras Toyota has to offer. So, let’s check out what’s different about the 2018 model and see if it helps the ole Sequoia’s case.

Continue reading for more on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia.

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2006 Toyota Sequoia

2006 Toyota Sequoia

The Toyota Sequoia full-size sport utility vehicle (SUV) continues into 2006 with minor enhancements after gaining a more powerful engine, freshened styling and additional safety features for 2005. The optional SR5 Sport Package introduced for 2005 gains standard second-row cloth bucket seats with a center console for 2006, and two new exterior colors, Timberland Mica and Salsa Red Pearl, have been added.

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