Uber

view grid view horizontal compact blog view
Behold The WayRay Holograktor - The Potential Future of Ride Hailing

Behold The WayRay Holograktor - The Potential Future of Ride Hailing

A Concept for now, this is unlike any other EV seen before and will offer autonomous transportation while you’re immersed in Metaverse

WayRay is a Swiss deep-tech startup, has introduced the Battery Electric Holograktor, which is the world’s first car with a holographic display that can superimpose items at any distance around the vehicle.

Read more
Best Cars For Uber Driving

Best Cars For Uber Driving

Joining Uber and your profits afterwards have a lot to do with the car you pick

Looking to join Uber? Then you’ll need a car that ticks a few boxes in order to maximize your profits. Usually, there are three main factors that matter most when picking your next Uber car, and most drivers set them as priorities: reliability, costs, and safety.

Naturally, you’ll want to stay away from repair shops for as long as possible and avoid costly repairs. What’s most, the car’s frugality is significant, too, for the obvious reasons, so don’t be surprised that the list below is brimming with hybrids. On top of that, there’s the safety aspect - you’ll be driving a lot, both alone and with passengers, so your and their well being is important.

Read more
Uber Elevate: Everything You Need To Know

Uber Elevate: Everything You Need To Know

Uber’s future mobility plans include a lot of flying

You might have heard the news that Uber has started a new service in New York under the Uber Copter nameplate. Essentially, the company will offer helicopter rides for those looking to travel from lower Manhattan to J.F.K. airport. The flight time is estimated at around eight minutes and will cost between $200 and $225 per person, according to The New York Times. So, why are we telling you this? Because three years ago, Uber highlighted plans that included a separate air-hauling division called Uber Elevate, which would use some sort of flying cars to take people from A to B. Naturally, everybody was buzzing but the project went a little silent over the past years. Uber Copter, however, might be the first sign that Elevate might still be happening. Here’s everything there is to know about Uber Elevate.

Read more
Best Cars for Lyft and Uber Drivers

Best Cars for Lyft and Uber Drivers

Ten Cars You Should Seriously Consider For Your Uber Business Gig

With the surge of popularity of the ridesharing services like Lyft and Uber, it seems that we are on the verge of creating whole new vehicle segments focused solely on satisfying the needs ridesharing users have. Obviously, Lyft and Uber aren’t the only ones in the ridesharing world, but they are the most popular.

With that said, both the drivers and the passengers do expect certain qualities of their rides. After my research, I have picked up ten best cars for Uber and Lyft ride-sharing services.

Read more
Pretty Soon You'll Be Able to Own a Little Bit of Uber and Lyft

Pretty Soon You’ll Be Able to Own a Little Bit of Uber and Lyft

We’re talking about hundreds of billions of dollars here

The ride-hailing industry is witnessing a lot of changes lately. Moving from car services to cycles, to pressing autonomous cars into service, etc., this industry is seeing a lot of things happening rapidly. Now, two giants, Uber and Lyft have decided to go public. Both companies have already filed the necessary S-1 paperwork with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, confirming their intent to go public on the New York Stock Exchange.

Read more
Uber Planning To Revive Its Self-Driving Car Program With The Help Of A Former NHTSA Official

Uber Planning To Revive Its Self-Driving Car Program With The Help Of A Former NHTSA Official

This is the reincarnation of the service for Uber

Uber has decided to revive its self-driving car program nine months after the fatal crash in Tempe, Arizona that took the life of an innocent pedestrian. Uber has hired a former National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) official, Nat Beuse, to work in the company’s self-driving car program. According to Reuters, Nat Beuse previously oversaw vehicle safety research at the NHTSA.

Read more
Uber Moves to Resume Autonomous Testing on Public Roads

Uber Moves to Resume Autonomous Testing on Public Roads

But will the public move on from the deadly accident in March?

Uber wants to resume testing of its autonomous vehicle systems eight months after a Volvo SUV, part of the Uber test program struck and killed a pedestrian in Arizona. Now, Uber wants to kick off testing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and hopes to regain public trust.

Back in March, a Volvo XC90 SUV equipped with Uber’s self-driving systems hit a pedestrian who was crossing a street at night in Tempe, Arizona. Although the person was hit away from a crosswalk, Arizona officials quickly suspended Uber’s permits that allowed it to test the new technology on public roads in the aftermath of the incident.

Now, Uber has released a detailed safety report to showcase the lengths it will go to to ensure that future testing of the autonomous technology will be carried out safely. The company stated that it carefully analyzed what went wrong and that it has improved the onboard systems and now wants to resume testing in Pennsylvania.

Read more
In the Not-So-Distant Future, Tesla Might Take on Uber and Lyft

In the Not-So-Distant Future, Tesla Might Take on Uber and Lyft

This is an announcement-disguised warning to the existing players

Despite all the controversy, things seem to be going well for Tesla. A couple of days back, CEO Elon Musk announced that Tesla has achieved a $312 million profit in the third quarter of 2018 - only the third time it has achieved a quarterly profit in its history of 15 years. However, this was not the only announcement made in the meeting. Musk spoke about Tesla Network – an upcoming self-driving ride-hailing service that could pose a serious threat to Uber and Lyft.

Read more
Uber's Fatal Crash Caused Because Its Software Chose to Ignore the Cyclist in the Road

Uber’s Fatal Crash Caused Because Its Software Chose to Ignore the Cyclist in the Road

Is this evidence that AI will kill off the human race if given the opportunity?

At this point, you already know about Uber’s fatal crash, and you know that neither the vehicle (artificial intelligence) or the person behind the wheel applied the brakes. Well, a report coming out of The Information cites sources close to the matter, saying that the software identified the cyclist but chose to ignore it. Let me repeat that. The car’s sensors realized there was a pedestrian in the road, but made a decision not to react right away.

This sounds like a clear-cut case AI taking the chance kill (let’s not forget about that robot that said it wanted to kill the human race) but the truth is that Uber’s software was “tuned” to ignore false positives. So, what is a false positive? Think about a plastic bag in the road or somebody’s old beer can rolling around in the street. It happens, and we all ignore it too. Uber claims that it’s simply a case of tuning gone wrong, or in other words, Uber’s software was set to react less to certain objects in the road. So much for erring on the side of caution.

Read more
Arizona Cries Foul; Suspends Uber's Authorization to Test Self-Driving Cars

Arizona Cries Foul; Suspends Uber’s Authorization to Test Self-Driving Cars

Investigation is still underway, but for now, Uber’s autonomous tech won’t be used on Arizona streets

Last week, we reported on an accident in Tempe, Arizona, wherein a pedestrian was struck and killed by a Volvo XC90 SUV conducting self-driving technology testing on behalf of the popular ride-hailing app Uber. In a recent development, Arizona officials have suspended all of Uber’s self-driving testing in the state.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
Uber Had Disabled Volvo's Safety Systems in that XC90 That Fatally Hit a Pedestrian

Uber Had Disabled Volvo’s Safety Systems in that XC90 That Fatally Hit a Pedestrian

It’s apparently standard practice to disable standard safety systems to test their own...

According to Aptiv, the company that supplies Volvo’s radar and camera, Uber had disabled the standard collision avoidance system on the XC90 that plowed into that pedestrian. For now, everyone else is remaining largely silent with Uber declining to comment and Volvo saying the company can’t speculate on the cause of the incident. However, Intel’s Mobileye, Aptiv’s supplier of chips and sensors for collision-avoidance systems played a video of the incident, and its software was able to detect the pedestrian one second before impact even with the “second-hand” quality of the video.

This, of course, is a move by Aptiv and Intel to protect themselves and their client, Volvo, who was apparently - -if these reports are to be believed – free of fault as the systems were disabled during the incident. This notion certainly angles the blame at Uber’s technology, which could be a huge problem for the company as Arizona has already revoked its permission to test autonomous cars on public roads. And, it certainly goes to show that Uber has a lot of work to do and really has no business having driverless cars on the road. The question now is, whether or not the rest of Uber’s autonomous operations will be subject to interruption. After all, the company just got done boasting its autonomous truck fleet.

For what it’s worth, disabling standard safety equipment included with vehicles at purchase may be a normal practice in order to help facilitate testing Uber’s own self-driving system. Even if it is standard practice, it looks like that standard practice may change in the near future, don’t you think?

Read more
Onboard Video of Uber's Fatal Crash Proves Humans, Nor Machines Can be Trusted

Onboard Video of Uber’s Fatal Crash Proves Humans, Nor Machines Can be Trusted

How many people have to die before people realize this technology isn’t ready?

Before we get to a video that will probably give you chills and your kid’s nightmares, let me just point out that, while some outlets claim this is the first fatal accident involving a self-driving car in the States, it isn’t. Remember when the Tesla Model S didn’t recognize a semi truck in front of it and killed its driver? Yeah, that happened. Be that as it may, Tesla isn’t in the spotlight today; Uber is, and so is the entire human race. We have this technology that, when properly developed and tested, could be absolutely amazing and save lives. Yet, we’re putting it in the hands of the general public for testing and, if Tesla drivers haven’t proven they don’t have the discipline to test a potentially dangerous technology, this Uber driver definitely has.

Read more
Uber Beat Tesla to the Punch; Has Self-Driving Trucks Operating on the Highway

Uber Beat Tesla to the Punch; Has Self-Driving Trucks Operating on the Highway

Don’t expect these driverless trucks to hit local roads, though

Adding worth to the adage “you can’t be the first in everything,” Tesla will have to take a backseat on who can claim to be the first company to roll out a fleet of self-driving trucks. That distinction rests on the shoulders of Uber, which announced that its self-driving haulers have been carrying cargo on the highways of Arizona for commercial freight customers over the past few months. While the trucks drive themselves on these highways, there are licensed operators that are still on board, ready to take over in the case of emergency. Eventually, though, Uber plans to use these self-driving trucks exclusively on long highway hauls and leaving human drivers to tackle shorter service trips.

Read more
Breaking: Uber-Branded, Self-Driving Car Strikes and Kills a Pedestrian

Breaking: Uber-Branded, Self-Driving Car Strikes and Kills a Pedestrian

Raises questions over public safety and self-driver testing

A pedestrian was struck and killed in Tempe, Arizona, by a self-driving car over the weekend, according to a report from the The New York Times. The incident occurred this past Sunday at 10 pm local time and involved an Uber-branded vehicle traveling in autonomous mode with a human safety pilot in the driver’s seat. Neither the system nor the human driver were unable to avoid the collision. The pedestrian involved was crossing the street outside of a crosswalk when she was struck by the vehicle.

This is the first known case of a pedestrian killed by a self-driving vehicle.

In response, Uber has suspended its public self-driving testing, including programs in Tempe, San Francisco, Toronto, and Pittsburgh. “Our hearts go out to the victim’s family. We are fully cooperating with local authorities in their investigation of this incident,” Uber said in a statement.

The incident follows a high-profile fatality back in 2016, when Joshua Brown was killed in a collision while operating his Tesla Model S in Autopilot mode. The system failed to recognize an 18-wheeler crossing the highway when the sedan passed under the trailer at highway speeds.

Continue reading for the full story.

Read more
NVIDIA Partners Up with Uber and Volkswagen for Vehicle-Based Artificial Intelligence

NVIDIA Partners Up with Uber and Volkswagen for Vehicle-Based Artificial Intelligence

Tech giant’s involvement in the autonomous driving business just got a lot bigger

Add Nvidia to the growing list of tech companies that are diving into the pool that is autonomous driving technology. The California-based computer chip maker is linking up with Volkswagen, Uber, and China-based autonomous driving startup Baidu to expand its involvement in the fast-growing autonomous driving space. Each partnership is independent of the other so Invidia effectively landed three separate deals with three separate companies. The scope of the partnerships differ depending on the company, but all three companies will make use of Nvidia’s state of the art computer chips to launch software systems that fit into their respective plans in the sphere of autonomous driving.

Read more