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Ford Builds First Truck 100 Years Ago Today

Ford Builds First Truck 100 Years Ago Today

Happy birthday to Ford’s iconic pickup truck

Ford is celebrating 100 years of making pickups today. It was July 27, 1917 that Ford introduced the Model TT pickup. It was based on the hugely popular Model T, but came with a stronger frame built to carry 2,000 pounds in its cargo bed. A meager 209 examples were built that year. Now, a century later, Ford’s F-Series pickups continue the legacy build by Henry Ford with trucks ranging from the half-ton F-150 to the commercial medium-duty F-750 Super Duty. Nearly a million examples sold in 2017, each costing a bit more than the Model TT’s price of $600.

Henry Ford designed the Model TT to accommodate aftermarket beds, allowing the truck to cater to an endless number of industries. Yet, the Model TT used the Model T’s cab and engine, helping cut costs while streamlining Ford’s genius of an assembly line production. Remember, it was Mr. Ford who started producing vehicles on an assembly line with the Model T just nine years prior. Amazingly, this concept hasn’t changed. Ford trucks continue to share parts, like the cab section between the F-150 and the updated-for-2017 Super Duty. Between 1917 and 2017, Ford has built dozens of generations and variations of its pickups, including more unique examples like the car-based Ranchero and the compact Ranger. A more comprehensive list is down below.

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Will The Government Track Citizens When The Next OBD Protocol Finds Its Way Into New Cars?

Will The Government Track Citizens When The Next OBD Protocol Finds Its Way Into New Cars?

OBD III could lead to invasion of privacy, unwarranted tracking, and even vehicle immobilization

Contrary to popular belief, the OBD II diagnostic system that has been built into every car since 1996 isn’t there to help diagnose serious problems with your car. It does have a nice side effect of assisting in the diagnosis of a less-than-happy engine, but the primary purpose is to detect emissions faults and scare you with that check engine light so you can spend the better part of your monthly salary to repair a system that – a majority of the time – doesn’t affect the way your engine runs or how the car drives. Think about it, we all have at least one friend who’s check engine light has been on for years, right?

Now that new cars have all of this connectivity through 4G internet connections and direct satellite communication, a new OBD system is in the works, and it’s something you might want to be worried about. Of course, it may help diagnose certain problems quick and more conclusively than the current onboard diagnostics that most of our cars have now, but there’s even more to it than that. The standards for the new OBD III system are apparently being written by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), but that should come as no surprise as they have the most stringent emissions laws in the U.S. More importantly, however, is how it will tie in with the new connectivity features that are becoming increasingly standard equipment from just about every manufacturer out there.

Think Tesla for a minute. The Model S, Model X, and upcoming Model 3 all have the ability to take over-the-air software updates and track just about everything the user does – the latter has never been more evident with the fraudulent claims that have been made against Tesla over its automatic parking feature in the recent months. Eventually, all cars will be tracked like this, and with OBD III an inevitable reality in the future, the risk of privacy invasion in cars has never been higher.

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