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It Took an Electric Car to Silence The McLaren 720S

It Took an Electric Car to Silence The McLaren 720S

Believe it or not, it’s electricity and race-grade technology that defeated the otherwise vicious Macca

The McLaren 720S has been instilling fear into every out-and-out supercar, muscle car, and sports car you can think of. It has more drag race wins under its belt than we can count and it’s arguably one of the most quick-accelerating cars on sale today. But it is no match for the audacious Volkswagen ID.R.

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2020 Volkswagen Golf Crossover

2020 Volkswagen Golf Crossover

New Golf-Based Crossover Could Replace The Standard Golf In The U.S.

Volkswagen actively tests an all-new, raised Golf. We have seen it in Sweden in the winter, and even on the Nurburgring in May. While Volkswagen did not announce anything new in the Golf lineup, we may be surprised with a new Golf-based crossover, or an innovative, fresh, jacked up version of the popular hatchback. As Volkswagen actively seeks out new segments to sell its vehicles in, I can identify at least two market brackets where the new Golf-based crossover or just a jacked up hatch could play its part.

If you look closely at the Mercedes-Benz lineup, you can see that its entry-level crossover - the GLA - feels like a jacked-up version of the A-class. If Volkswagen creates something similar to it, based around the Golf’s basic shape and chassis, then it would be the only manufacturer in this very tight segment to offer a cheaper alternative to the GLA.

On the other hand, a raised Golf hatch might not be anything more than just a hatchback version of the upcoming Golf Alltrack. That car would directly compete with the cool Ford Focus Active!

If it comes to fruition, this alleged new five-seat crossover will sit between the T-Cross and the T-Roc within the Volkswagen lineup. Interestingly enough, Volkswagen did announce an all-new five-seat crossover at its media event earlier this year. This might well be it, and I would not be surprised if Germans transform slow-selling Golf Plus into a sort of a crossover.

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Easter Special: Easter Eggs of the Car World

Easter Special: Easter Eggs of the Car World

Have you found where these cars are hiding?

In a world that has more supercars and sports cars than you can keep track of, it’s pretty easy for those that don’t go mainstream to get lost. It’s sad when you think about it. Over the years, there have been some interesting concept and production cars that never got the attention they deserved. Take the Tushek Renovatio T500, for instance. Have you ever heard of it? I’m guessing you probably haven’t, but it was a remarkably beautiful car with distinct styling that should have made it a favorite among collectors.

These days, we’re blessed with every supercar manufacturer dropping a new model on a regular basis. In fact, we’re spoiled, when you think about it. And like any group of spoiled children, as soon as we get what we want, we immediately start asking for more. It’s not that the supercars we all know and love, like the Koenigsegg One:1, Bugatti Chiron, or the Pagani Huayra BC aren’t special, because they certainly are. They’re just well known, and even if you haven’t seen one in person, you’ve seen one on TV or Youtube.

So, in light of Easter this year, we’ve decided to look back at a few cars that are very much “Easter eggs” of the automotive world, and that’s if you can even find them at all. I’m talking about cars like the aforementioned Tushek Renovatio T500, or the Tramontana XTR. Some of these car’s never made it into production, while others were produced and fizzled away into automotive history. Either way, let’s take a look at a few of my favorites.

Continue reading to discover a few automotive Easter eggs.

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Volkswagen's Takeover of Porsche is Complete

Volkswagen’s Takeover of Porsche is Complete

For the most part, business deals are massaged with care and come together with relative ease and little drama. We guess the Germans must do things a little differently, as the VW takeover of Porsche was anything but easy and drama-free. In fact, it was closer to the exact opposite.

Seven years ago, Porsche was sitting pretty and decided it wanted to expand, but bit off way more than it could chew when it tried to buy out Volkswagen. This attempted takeover split Porsche’s ownership group and eventually resulted in Porsche falling into extreme debt and abandoning the takeover plan.

In 2009, the script flipped and VW ended up indirectly owning 49.9 percent of Porsche and striking an agreement in 2009 to buy up the remaining 50.1 percent. That agreement turned south when VW realized that the resulting tax payments for the purchase were its responsibility. Well, after some nifty dance steps with the taxman, VW managed to avoid paying taxes on the purchase and the deal was all but complete.

Now we can finally announce that the deal is 100 percent complete, and VW is now the sole owner of Porsche AG. The total purchase deal is going to send €4.46 billion ($5.59 billion) and a single common share of VW stock to Porsche SE. Volkswagen plans to integrate Porsche into its automotive group on August 1, 2012. Porsche SE will also receive an additional €320 million ($401 million) in lost dividend payments and net synergies, due to the rapid integration of Porsche AG into VW’s ownership group – basically VW is paying off Porsche SE to gain quicker control of its automotive group.

With this, VW’s impressive automotive group grows yet again. We are starting to wonder how big Volkswagen AG can really get before it’s too big for its own good.

Click past the jump to read the full and complicated presser from VW.

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Volkswagen and Porsche Successfully Perform the Avoid-the-Taxman Dance

Volkswagen and Porsche Successfully Perform the Avoid-the-Taxman Dance

We all know that when you buy or sell anything of significant worth, the gummament is not too far away with its hand out asking for its share. It doesn’t care which side it comes from, just as long as someone pays “The Man.” Well, when VW AG decided it was time to buyout the remaining 50.1 percent of Porsche and get its former ownership group completely out of the picture, we were talking billions of Euros, €4.5 billion to be exact.

Well, even in Germany, “The Man,” or better yet “Der Mann,” is there in the form of the Baden-Württemberg Finance Ministry asking for his cut of the deal, which would total about €1.5 billion ($1.9 million). This was just about the breaking point of the entire deal, as a part of the buyout was that VW pays the tax.

After five months of massaging the numbers, looking at the laws, and manipulating things in ways that would make a business ethics major cringe, VW and Porsche are about to pull off this deal 100 percent tax free. How they pulled this off was simple enough… The only real sticking point was the fact that VW had to find out how to manipulate the deal into a corporate restructuring, as opposed to a sale.

To achieve a restructuring classification instead of a buy-sell classification, VW gave Porsche the €4.5 billion buying price, but included in that price a single voting share of VW stock… Yeah, that’s it. One little piece of paper that says “I can vote on important issues” saved VW €1.5 billion. Gotta love those tax attorneys.

The deal has yet to be approved by state authorities, but sans any omissions or errors, this looks to be a final deal that gives VW the title to Porsche, instead of just a rental contract.

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Volkswagen setting its sights on Ferrari

Volkswagen setting its sights on Ferrari

The auto industry’s resident Pac-Man, Volkswagen, is looking to gobble up a stake in another car brand after failing to get a piece of Alfa Romeo. The interesting part is that it’s a brand that’s considered the main rival of one of VW’s Lamborghini. Care to venture a guess, everyone?

Ferrari.

The rationale behind this seems a bit perplexing considering that, in addition to Lamborghini, Volkswagen already has a stable of supercar brands in their line-up, including Bugatti, Audi, and Porsche. Of course, it doesn’t look like Volkswagen seems to care about this wrinkle considering they’ve been trying to acquire brands left and right, especially considering that they’ve got so much money – about $27 billion - to spend.

Of course, for this whole thing to get any legs, Volkswagen needs to have Fiat’s sign-off, which, if you ask us, is a pretty tough shake especially when you take into account the fact that Ferrari is Fiat’s meal ticket and cutting their gains by selling some of its stake doesn’t sound like a good business decision. But what do we know, right?

The rumors floating around have actually been contrary to what we think should happen given that there are whispers that Fiat is interested in selling stakes to the brand while maintaining a majority stake in Ferrari.

That being said, Volkswagen chief Ferdinand Piech is still openly interested in the Prancing Horse brand, even if it means just owning a small percentage in the company.

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Check out this solar powered Volkswagen supercar!

Check out this solar powered Volkswagen supercar!

The problem with a lot of solar powered vehicles is that they don’t look all that good. Remember two years ago when the University of Michigan won the Solar Car Challenge? That car was hideous and not something anyone would want to ride around in; even if it is better for the environment.

Well, Peter Wilkins believes his vehicle can not only be powered by the sun, but also look good while doing it. His solar powered Volkswagen supercar is an entry in the 2010 Swansea Metropolitan University Degree Show in automotive design. It has integrated photovoltaic cells that are positioned on the upper external surface of the vehicle. These cells harvest solar energy and provide power for the mid-mounted hydrogen fuel cell stack. The four wheels will each be driven by an independent electric motor.

The best part about his creation is that it looks the part of a supercar. We don’t know anything about the car’s performances, but we do know a little about the design. The supercar borrows design elements from the Volkswagen Scirocco such as the forward pitching nose, side features, and the dominant front grill.

Since the Volkswagen concept is a luxury supercar, it will only be built in a limited number of 200 units. It was designed to be able to cruise around in the year 2020.

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2001 Volkswagen W12

2001 Volkswagen W12

Volkswagen showcased the latest evolution of their W12 Concept launched in 1997 and 1998 at the 2001 Tokyo Motorshow. This third phase evolution is very close to being production ready.

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